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"Behold, I make all things new"..... and new is good

Updated on May 5, 2013
St. Paul, an unrelenting prophet and servant of Jesus who helped to lay the foundation of the Catholic Church as we know it today
St. Paul, an unrelenting prophet and servant of Jesus who helped to lay the foundation of the Catholic Church as we know it today
Unlike the early Apostles and their followers,  modern day Catholics have a mulitude of options as it relates to attending Sunday Mass, both in terms of schedule and even the  language in which the Mass is celebrated
Unlike the early Apostles and their followers, modern day Catholics have a mulitude of options as it relates to attending Sunday Mass, both in terms of schedule and even the language in which the Mass is celebrated
God's uplifting message to all those who believe, love one another and follow him
God's uplifting message to all those who believe, love one another and follow him
"God will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and there shall be no more death or mourning, wailing or pain, for the old order has passed away"
"God will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and there shall be no more death or mourning, wailing or pain, for the old order has passed away"
Whether interpreted literally or symbolically, the Book of Revelation is a story rooted in triumph, as all those who believe will be saved when good inevitably conquers evil
Whether interpreted literally or symbolically, the Book of Revelation is a story rooted in triumph, as all those who believe will be saved when good inevitably conquers evil | Source
"I wish my identity wasn't so wrapped up with who I am"
"I wish my identity wasn't so wrapped up with who I am"
What qualities go into the making of our all-important true Catholic Identity?
What qualities go into the making of our all-important true Catholic Identity?
Members of the African Independent Church adorned in their traditional white robes
Members of the African Independent Church adorned in their traditional white robes
The Capuchian Friars: known for their tireless Missionary Work....and their ability to hit the breaking ball
The Capuchian Friars: known for their tireless Missionary Work....and their ability to hit the breaking ball | Source

Fostering our true Catholic identity


As we delve into the Sunday Readings in this the 5th Week of Easter we observe Paul making yet more progress as Jesus' appointed shepherd, particularly as it relates to the formation of the infrastructure and hierarchy of the Church (Acts 13:14, 43-52 (51C)). While it's easy to underestimate the importance of these early yet vital days of the Church, the fact remains that it was here that the foundation of Catholic Christianity as we know it today was built. After all, those who attend or have attended Sunday Mass over the course of their lives can naturally take for granted the privilege of doing so free of persecution or even the encumbrance of time. For as the Apostles and their followers huddled when, where and as they could in order to avoid the wrath of the Sanhedrin, modern day American Catholics face no such tribulation....and we're typically afforded the opportunity to do so at 7:30AM, 9:00AM, 10:30AM or even Noon.

But complacency must be avoided and hearts awoken for there is much at stake. In the 2nd Reading we pick up where we left off last week in the apocalyptic Book of Revelation (21:1-5a). John recounts his vision in glorious detail:

"Then I, John, saw a new heaven and a new earth. The former heaven and the former earth had passed away and the sea was no more. I also saw the holy city, a new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. I hear a loud voice from the throne saying "Behold, God's dwelling is with the human race. He will dwell with then and they will be his people and God himself will always be with them as their God. He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and there shall be no more death or mourning, wailing or pain, for the old order has passed away." The One who sat on the throne said "Behold, I make all things new"

Unlike our Fundamentalist Friends, Catholics tend to view the Book of Revelation through the prism of its rich symbolism. This is not to say that many of those same fundamentalists do not offer some very thought-provoking and painstakingly detailed interpretations, many of which I read with great interest right here on Hubpages written by the likes of glynn1 and others. But whether for example we interpret the passage "...and the sea was no more" as being symbolic of all chaos, danger and evil exiting the world as a result of God's triumph over sin (the sea had long been a symbol of all of those things in the typical Hebrew land-based way of thinking at the time) or envision a literal and outright vanishing, all believers can agree that God has promised and willed a future of unlimited love and happiness. In fact the promise that "God will wipe away every tear from their eyes" appears once again this week after being the featured subtext of last week's 2nd Reading, perhaps to underscore the power and beauty of the verse in equal measure.

The Gospel then provides all believers with the roadmap to this promised paradise, one earned through the blood and agony of Christ in the form of the new commandment:

"Love one another. As I have loved you, so you also should love one another. This is how all will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another" - John 34-35

Simple enough right?

Hardly.

Not only are we to love one another as ourselves, but we must strive to do so in a way that emulates the way Jesus loves us......so we essentially are asked to love our neighbors more than ourselves, for Jesus in taking up his cross proved that he loved His children more than He loved His own life. Michael Jordan's successor in Chicago had an easier act to follow.

And talk about a contrarian, counter-cultural demand. After all, we've been drilled to do otherwise:

"You gotta look out for Number 1!"

"It's a dog eat dog world out there!"

"Do it to them before they do it to you!"

But as we've seen and learned both in Scripture and our own daily trials and tribulations, Jesus will not make us walk this difficult road alone. And if we choose to walk this difficult path, we ultimatley achieve and live out our identity as Catholic Christians.

Throughout history, Catholics have struggled with the formation of their true and genuine identity, their face to the rest of the world if you will. Father Munachi E. Ezeogu discusses this idea of identity in his on-line homily this week. He touches on both the visual and symbolic, pointing to the example of the African Independent Churches and their use of uniforms to distinguish members from non-members. White flowing gowns with headgear and sashes of different colors are used to identify members according to their various ranks. Here in the United States, uniforms and habits have taken a bit of a back seat over the years, but this is not to say that they have disappeared altogether, the Capuchin Friars adorned in their trademark brown robes and sandals serving as a pertinent example.

But Fr. Ezeogu is quick to point out that one's true identity goes far beyond mere symbolism. For when Jesus issued this new commandment, he essentially implores us to reveal our identity through the way we act, not in how we dress or the rituals that we parktake of, as important as they may be to our heritage. He goes on to point out that during the early stages of the evangelization of Africa, many missionary groups focused their efforts strictly on making converts. Others who came later focused on service to the people, providing vital medicare and forulative education. These latter groups succeeded where the the former groups failed.

Interesting.

In researching for this Essay I came across not one but two references to Mahatma Gandhi's rather famous quote when surveyed on his view of Christianity. The renowned pacifist was blunt and poignant in his assessment:

"I have a great respect for Christianity. I know of no one who has done more for humanity that Jesus. In fact, there is nothing wrong with Christianity, but the trouble is with you Christians. You do not begin to live up to your own teachings."

Ouch....the truth sure does hurt sometimes. Perhaps some deep and honest introspection is in order.

We've tried it our way. Bullet after bullet, war after war, killing after kiling, it just doesn't seem to end and it certainly doesn't work. God promises to make all things new. The question of course becomes whether or not we will step back from our old ways and allow Him to. Love of our neighbor is the first and most critical step in that direction, for in doing s we allow God to begin to make all things new today.

And newness is precisely what this world needs.






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