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A Theory Of Why Some People Dislike The Theory Of Evolution

Updated on July 30, 2012
What if we evolved from the dolphins?
What if we evolved from the dolphins? | Source

I was participating in a discussion group with some Christians some weeks ago. It was a group comprising a husband and wife, a dating couple, an elderly gentleman and a Chinese national. We discussed various topics related to Christianity and life in general.

The subject under discussion turned to the theory of evolution. It seemed that everyone was in agreement that evolution was a theory and not a proven scientific fact. I ventured that although evolution has never been observed directly, the time that we have been actively observing is just too short to come to any sort of conclusion.

I continued by saying that evolution does not in any way prove that there is no God, nor does it reduce the omnipotence of God in the overall scheme of things. And that those who are passionate about the creation vs evolution debate and would defend creation to the death might be completely missing the point.

In fact, I believe that a God that simply creates the universe and everything else simply by literally snapping his fingers is actually less "powerful" than a God that creates a universe with the proper physical laws so that when the conditions are right, life such as us will evolve.

I mean, any Tom, Dick and Harry can design a computer, but to design a computer that is intelligent enough to design another computer, that would be quite a feat.

But I digress.

The elderly gentleman took issue with what I said. He said that there is no way that we could have evolved from the monkeys. While he did not say it, his voice conveyed extreme disdain for our primate cousins. He stated that we could not have come from the monkeys as we are so much better than them.

If monkeys were human, I could probably have accused him of racial discrimination. But since monkeys are of another species, perhaps he is guilty of "species" discrimination? I get that he doesn't like monkeys. But what is more unpalatable to him is that, if the theory of evolution is right, his distant ancestors were monkeys. And hence his strong reaction to monkeys and the theory of evolution.

What if evolution states that we came from a more "attractive" creature? It would have been nice if we had descended from the friendly dolphins or the powerful dinosaurs. The speedy cheetah would also have made a nice ancestor. I, personally, would like the mighty lion as my great-great-great...grandfather.

Take a look at the debates on creation and evolution in some of the online forums. While some evolutionists do get a little passionate, it is the creationists that comes across as being very resolute in defending their cause. So resolute that they will resort to insults, personal attacks and generally being very onerous, giving a very bad impression of the God that they are apparently defending.

If you really take a step back and consider, maybe those creationists just don't like monkeys.

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    • wandererh profile imageAUTHOR

      David Lim 

      8 years ago from Singapore

      robpeach - I like it when you said: "I have too many questions, leaving me with much confusion pertaining toward any of it."

      Whether you are a man of God or a man of science, there are many questions that are being asked - questions with no easy answer. It seems that at every turn, whenever a question is answered, another dozen other questions will be asked.

      Keep asking your questions, for I think that is the only way to eventually understand the true nature of things.

      Thanks for visiting. :)

    • wandererh profile imageAUTHOR

      David Lim 

      8 years ago from Singapore

      quicksand - I have to believe that there is a lot more to life and death than just life and death itself, otherwise I might as well just end it all right now. And I do believe that there is a lot more to life and death than life and death itself. :)

    • quicksand profile image

      quicksand 

      8 years ago

      Most atheists or all of them argue only up to a point beyond which their belief or disbelief is in danger of losing credibility. One of the speed breakers is a point at which what matters is that there is a lot more to life and death than life and death itself. Cheers!

    • robpeach profile image

      robpeach 

      8 years ago from The Internet

      my only argument is this...

      Memory is required for natural instinct to work properly, for how else could these basic living skills be passed forward along with their slight respect to heritage?

      It should not be confused, however, as being a part of free will. We have proven millions of years of animal survival on this planet, but only with the human memory has intervention truly been possible.

      The mind of an animal should never be confused with the Mind of God, and not to be taken so lightly, either, that we also are made in His Image. Or so says certain scriptures, whether we should believe these is another debate, perhaps for a different day.

      I have yet to see an animal stare at me with an inwardly feeling of self-consciousness toward their outwardly physical actions. Animals do not feel shame, nor should the look of fear be confused with this. When is the last time you did your business in front of somebody without feeling just a bit awkward?

      Do you really believe simple counting skills taught to monkeys will one day lead to physics and calculus? That being the case, how is it we did it in ten thousand years, and the monkey couldn't do it after being given millions?

      Beyond this, I have too many questions, leaving me with much confusion pertaining toward any of it. Did the missing link get kicked out of the Garden of Eden?

      Very excellent article, and nicely written with style.

    • wandererh profile imageAUTHOR

      David Lim 

      8 years ago from Singapore

      Thanks. It's an angle that I think nobody has explored yet. :)

    • thevoice profile image

      thevoice 

      8 years ago from carthage ill

      well explianed thanks

    • wandererh profile imageAUTHOR

      David Lim 

      8 years ago from Singapore

      Being passionate about something is definitely good. But, without going into the specifics, some creationists do take it a little too far.

      And, I don't equate a belief in the theory of evolution to a disbelief in the existence of God. I think that one can believe in evolution and also in the existence of God.

      Thanks for dropping by. :)

    • parrster profile image

      Richard Parr 

      8 years ago from Australia

      It's true, the more of ourselves given to a belief or concept, the more passionate (resolute) we will come across in defending it; and even more so if we see significant consequence attached to what side one holds. I suppose for the evolutionist who doesn't believe in God, they have less reason to be emotionally passionate, because for them there is no great consequence in either believing or disbelieving (after all, they most likely won't believe in an afterlife). For the believer, the consequence of unbelief is frightening, therefore we should expect them to be more passionate. That's human.

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