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Bray Road monster

Updated on April 26, 2017

What could it be?

Bray Road is a two mile stretch of road outside of Wisconsin that doesn't have much to make it a popular road unless you count the beautiful scenery or the tale of horror that has haunted it for years.

The first reports of the Beast of Bray Road began in 1949 in a community outside of Elkhorn Wisconsin. The beast has never been sighted turning from man to creature but most of the reports say that it is a type of Wolf-Man creature that stands about 7 feet tall, weighs about 400 pounds and seems intelligent enough to interact with and chase humans from the area.

There are a few reports of people in the 1940's who would be out in the woods for walks and would come back with stories of being attacked and chased by a giant Wolf Man type creature. Their clothes would be torn indicating they did come across and were attacked by something. If they were attacked by a man, why would they say it was a Wolf Man type of creature; why not say they were attacked by a man?

More recently a man reported, as part of his job, he was picking up road kill and was startled when, while stopped to fill out a little paperwork he suddenly felt something heavy push down on his is truck. When he turned around he was met with the sight of a giant Wolf-Man picking up a dead deer from the back of his truck. Needles to say, he threw the truck into gear and didn't return for a long time.

One interesting thing to know is that there have been more reported sightings of the Beast of Bray Road than any other Wolf-man type creature, making it the most popular cryptid of Wolf-Man there is.

People have tried to come up with different types of explanations as to what the beast could be, an escaped Wolf, man in a costume and a real beast. While none of these reports could be proven to be fake or real it's interesting to note that most of the people who come forward with these tales of seeing the creature have little or nothing to gain by it. Some reports come from people who refuse to be named for fear of the ridicule that is attached to coming forward with this. It's also interesting to note that tales of the creature have been around longer than white man has been living in Wisconsin.


One of the best Wendigo stories ever written

Before White Man

The Native Americans used to tell tales of a creature they called the Wendigo as a warning to their younger generations. It was meant to keep children from doing wrong and to make sure they behaved towards their elders.

According to the Native Americans Wendigo is a man that has turned into a cannibal type of creature, in stories it can range from looking like a mixture of the animals found in the forest with yellowing decaying skin to a shape shifter creature with no real form; both legends agree though that the creature is a cannibal that will never lose it's taste for human flesh. You never know when you will run into the creature either as it can attack you from above and below.

Another possibility that was put forth by the Native Americas was the creature being a Shape Shifter, or more correctly known as a Skin-walker. According to legend, a Skin-Walker was a man or woman who could turn into any animal simply by putting on the pelt of the animal it wished to turn into. In modern times, it is said by the local tribes that they have stopped using the pelts as that is a dead give away and they have learned and become powerful enough to transform at will.

Could the Natives, who lived on the land before White man, be right? Did they tell tales of something they had seen and understood better than we could ever hope to? Were the elders trying to warn the younger generation by not telling tall tales, by telling what they had witnessed?

A
bray road:
Bray Rd, Michigan, USA

get directions

© 2014 Chosen Shades

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