ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Religion and Philosophy»
  • Christianity, the Bible & Jesus

SAINT PAUL - The Thirteenth Apostle

Updated on May 13, 2011

The Thirteenth Apostle


I apologize for the mishap about my previous hub on Saint Paul, but I published it on another site, http://www.examiner.com/christian-in-detroit/the-transformation-of-saul-the-prosecutor-to-paul-the-apostle-part-i, and that is against hubpages rules. I will continue the series here on hubpages under the 'New Title: Saint Paul, the Thirteenth Apostle.

Part I

We are introduced to Saul, who would later become Paul, for the first time in the book of Acts by one of his closest companions, Luke. Strangely enough, this is also the scene of the first Christian martyr, Stephen. See Acts 6:8-8:1.

Paul was born in Tarsus, a gentile city, near the Mediterranean Sea on the southern shore of Turkey. He grew up in a strict Jewish family, trained in the Jewish scriptures and tradition. He learned to read and write at the synagogue day school at an early age by copying passages of Scripture. He learned the ancient Hebrew language; at that time the language had practically grown out of use. Their primary language was Aramaic.

Paul, by all accounts and purposes, was a young boy when his father sent him to Jerusalem to study under the Pharisaic elder ‘Gamaliel’, because during his defense before the Jews at Jerusalem, (Acts 22:1-5), he tells them; though he was born in Tarsus he was “brought up” in Jerusalem. Paul was yet a young man at the time Stephen was martyred as is stated in Acts 7:58.

Saul’s conversion. A.D. 37 (Approximate)

The day that Stephen was stoned to death a great persecution broke out against the Church in Jerusalem. Saul began his campaign to destroy the Church by going from house to house dragging men and women off to prison. See Acts 8:3

According to St. Luke in Acts 9:1 Paul was still making ‘murderous threats’ against the Lords disciples, when he went to the High Priest asking for letters to the synagogues in Damascus, “so that if he found any there who belonged to the Way,” he could take them as prisoners to Jerusalem. After securing the letters Paul set out for Damascus. What happened during his journey is related in detail three (3) times in the Acts account, first by Luke the historian, then in two addresses Paul made at Jerusalem and before Agrippa. Acts 9:3-9; Acts 22:1-13; Acts 26:1-18

It was the Damascus Church that first, reluctantly I’m sure, received Paul at the hand and urging of Ananias. Isn’t it amazing that Paul began preaching Jesus the Christ as the one true Messiah at the same synagogues that he had secured letters to arrest the very people he was embracing as brothers and sisters in Christ.

The narrative in the Acts tells us that he was occupied with the work of preaching the word of God for “many days”, up to the time when danger drove him from Damascus.

Stay tuned for Part II.




Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Wehzo profile image
      Author

      Nathaniel Stalling Jr 6 years ago from Detroit, MI

      Thank you James.

    • James A Watkins profile image

      James A Watkins 6 years ago from Chicago

      Thank you for posting this terrific account of the early part of the story of Saul of Tarsus, soon to become the Apostle Paul. Your report is concise and pithy. Well done!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)