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The Self-Healing Mechanism in a Christian

Updated on December 17, 2017
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Matthew is a Christian who loves God. He loves to share his faith with people all over the world.

Christians have a self-healing mechanism in them; it’s in them in person of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit was the one who empowered Jesus; he was the one who made Jesus the healer, empowering him to heal all manner of sicknesses and diseases (Acts 20:32).

All that needs to happen is for a Christian to be filled with the Holy Ghost, after that, he’s had it made; he has the power over every sickness that tries to rule over his body. Why is that? It’s because the Holy Ghost is God alive in a human vessel (Eph. 2:22). He’s the essence of divinity, and that divinity is in us, Christians. It’s called the divine nature (2 Peter 1:4).

Now, since it’s impossible for a divine being like God to be sick, so is it impossible for a person, a Christians, who has been initiated into this fraternity of divinity to be sick.

Did Christians Receive Healing?

In Christianity, there are a couple of things that need to be acknowledged as being a normalcy for us, even though it's not normal in the world. The Holy Ghost was given to us so that we can get to know and acknowledge the things that are given to us of God (1 Corinth. 2:12).

Furthermore, the sharing of our faith becomes effectual by the acknowledging of the good things that are in us (Phil. 1:6). When we acknowledge the good things in us, then we can get them to work for us. Consequently, the people of the world can also get to see and believe and accept our faith because of the wonders that they're seeing in us. That’s a subtle way of preaching the gospel.

Having said that, I will like to counter a watered-down theology that says Christians received healing or were healed at the cross (1 Peter 2:24). Well, wouldn't it be right to say not every verse in the Bible applies to Christians? Of course! Now, Peter’s writing in the above verse wasn’t written to Christians, it was written to Jews who were scattered abroad throughout Asia Minor. The Jews were the ones under the covenant; the covenant of healing was for the Jewish Church, the Old Testament Church. They were the ones healed by His stripes.

The Church of Jesus Christ that was born after His resurrection, in the real sense, doesn’t require healing from God. The Church has a self-healing mechanism. We received more than healing—we received the life and nature of God—Zoe, otherwise known as eternal life. And this life is un-infectable with sickness. That’s what Jesus came to give Christian (John 10:10).

Furthermore, at the cross of Jesus, no one had yet become a Christian. Christianity didn’t begin at the cross—it was after the resurrection of Jesus Christ that Christianity began.

And anyone who believed in Jesus, not before he died, not after his death and burial, but after he resurrected from the dead, that’s who became a Christian. So at the cross, as 1 Peter 2:24 implies, healing was perfected for the Jews. Yet, things got even better for Christians after the cross—after the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

The God-Life

Now, becoming a Christian literally implies that you have the life of God—the God-life—that cannot be contaminated by sickness. The scriptures says, “That whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life” (John 3:15). ‘Eternal life’ is the divine life of God resident in a human vessel.

You see, as a Christian, you’ve got a divine nature, the life of God in you actually supplants the life of your biological parents in you. The Bible says, “Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth for ever” (1 Peter 1:23).

The words, “corruptible seed” denotes the seed or sperm of a man, that’s where the life of a child comes from. However, the Bible says that that life has been supplanted by the divine life of God— the incorruptible seed. That means, once a man becomes a Christian, the life that sustaining him is no longer in his blood, but in the life of God in him—the Holy Ghost.

I know this might be a little baffling for some folks but the truth is ignorance to things like this is what makes a Christian subject to the negativities that’s resident in the world. However, there are a couple of reasons why a Christian’s life isn’t in the blood but in the Holy Ghost.

First, Jesus resurrected from the dead by the power of the Holy Ghost, meanwhile, he was without blood in the tomb. While he was still hanging on the cross, a soldier had pierced him on the side and the Bible recorded that, “forthwith came there out blood and water” (John 19:34). That means he’d died and his heart had ruptured already, hence all the blood and water in him gushed out when his side was pierced with a spear.

Furthermore, Jesus said, after his resurrection, that one of the ways you’d recognize a Christian was that, “if they drink any deadly thing, it shall not hurt them” (Mark 16:18). Why? Because the life of a Christian, as stated earlier, isn’t the life he got from his biological parents but from the Holy Ghost—he’s born of the Holy Ghost. That’s why John 1:13 says a Christian is, “born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God.”

That’s seems to tell me that there’s more to a man, especially a Christian, beyond what you can see physically. Man is a spirit being; not a body being. And since a Christian man (spirit), as the above scripture says, isn’t born of blood but of God. That means, just as God is a spirit being, man is a spirit being. And if he’s a Christian, the life that runs in him is the life of God—called ‘zoe’ in the Greek; it’s also known as eternal life. And that’s what Jesus came to give us (John 10:10).

Many people might be of the opinion that the life of God in them is just resident in their spirits, but doesn’t have any connection or function with their bodies. But that’s a misnomer. The Bible says in 1 Corinth. 6:19, “your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost which is in you.”

Also, if we look at 1 Corinth. 6:13 in a couple of version we’ll sees what the Bible says plainly:

- The body is… to serve the Lord; and the Lord provides for the body (TEV).

- The body… [is intended] for the Lord, and the Lord [is intended] for the body [to save, sanctify, and raise it again] (AMP).

- But our bodies… were made for the Lord, and the Lord cares about our bodies (NLT).

The Lord doesn’t just inhabit the body for nothing; he’s not just in there for decoration, he provides for it, saves it from sickness, and also cares for it. He’s interested in how the body fares!

The Translation Error

In many Bible translations, there’s an error in the rendering of Romans 8:10. In the KJV, it reads: “And if Christ be in you, the body is dead because of sin; but the Spirit is life because of righteousness.” Well, this doesn’t really make sense because as it seems to connote, “if Christ be in you, then your body is dead”; no.

The problem with the KJV is that it seems to say the body is dead because Christ is in you and/or because of sin. The body is not dead for either of the two reasons. The body being subject to death is quite different from the body being dead.

The word ‘is’ in the verse above wasn’t in the original manuscript, it was added by the translators. However, we see a couple of other version picking the word same word ‘is’:

- And if Christ is in you, though the body is dead because of sin, yet the spirit is alive because of righteousness (NASB).

- But if Christ lives in you, [then although] your [natural] body is dead by reason of sin and guilt, the spirit is alive because of [the] righteousness [that He imputes to you] (AMP).

- But if Christ is in you, your body is dead because of sin, yet your spirit is alive because of righteousness (NIV).

In fact, everywhere the word ‘is’ appears spoils the contextual meaning of this verse, whether ‘is’ pertaining to the body being dead or ‘is’ pertaining to the spirit being alive. ‘Is’ wasn’t in the original manuscript; it was added by the translators. However, that single word—is—literally spoils the original meaning of the verse

According to the Law of Bible interpretation, every scripture must be interpreted in the light of what other scriptures says on the same subject. Bible verses must harmonize with one another before a meaning is derived. And the problem is, generally, throughout the Bible, the body isn’t called dead. The body becoming dead isn’t the same as the body is dead.

In context, if we check the next verse, which is Rom. 8:11, immediately after Rom. 8:10, we’ll see that it reveals the contextual meaning of the 10th verse. Therefore, a better translation would be: “And if Christ be in you, though the body [be] dead because of sin, the Spirit [gives it] life because of righteousness.

The next verse says, “But if the Spirit of him that raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you, he that raised up Christ from the dead shall also quicken your mortal bodies by his Spirit that dwelleth in you.” Now, connecting both verses, in context, we see that the mortal body is quickened or made alive by the Spirit that dwells in it. That’s the contextual connotation: The Spirit gives the body life; the righteousness of the Spirit produces a cure for the corruption of sin made manifest in the body.

The Day of Redemption

Eph. 4:30 enunciates, “And grieve not the holy Spirit of God, whereby ye are sealed unto the day of redemption.” The Holy Spirit in every believer is God's seal of ownership.

That seals testifies to the fact that a Christian is God’s property and only what God permits can happen to his property. However, this doesn’t mean God is going to work on repairing your body against your will; no. God’s needs your permission to do what he wants to do with your body.

You know, God dwells in our bodies (1 Corinth. 6:19). And just as no man would want his dwelling place—his house—to break down or get destroyed by anything, so does God hate for his dwelling place to be faulty. That’s why he’s (God) ready, with your corporation, to keep his house in good shape until the day of redemption—the day where we’ll be getting brand new bodies.

The day of redemption, as the name implies, is the day of complete redemption of the body (Rom. 8:23). On this day, there’ll be complete recovery of the body from death and corruption. The particular and striking act of this day will be the raising up of the body from the grave, and rendering it immortal and eternally blessed.

On this day, the body will be permanently restored from all sins and all the evil consequences of the fall. It’s like it’s the day when our bodies are going to get ‘born again.’ We’ll be getting brand new bodies then.

Meanwhile, we have to make do with this body we have which is still subject to the evil consequences of the fall (i.e., sickness and death). However, that doesn’t mean we are supposed to put up with everything evil we see in our bodies.

And that’s why we’re sealed with the Holy Ghost until the day of redemption: To keep us protected from the evil consequences of the fall that’s bound to rear its ugly head in our bodies in form of sicknesses and diseases.

In fact, the proof that our bodies ought not to be subjecto the evil consequences of the fall is the seal of the Holy Ghost that’s upon us. Because of the Holy Ghost in us, we have a prerogative as Christians to refuse and reject everything that’s associated with the fall of Adam because as Christians, we’re not of the Adamic nature but if the Lord’s nature; a divine nature (2 Peter 1:4).

Put the Healing Power of God to Work

As the scripture says, we aren’t just made a living soul like Adam, nor do we just have a life-giving spirit in us, but we’re made life-giving spirits (1 Corinth. 15:45), because we’re after the image of the last Adam—Jesus. No wonder Elisha was so full of this Spirit that even after he’d died, his bones brought a dead man back to life after it made contact with the dead man’s body (2 Kings 13:21). No wonder Jesus said we can get the sick healed by just laying our hands on them (Mk. 16:18).

Paul wrote a letter to Timothy; he said to “Neglect not the gift that is in thee, which was given thee by prophecy, with the laying on of the hands of the presbytery” (1 Timothy. 4:14). In another place he said, “Wherefore I put thee in remembrance that thou stir up the gift of God, which is in thee by the putting on of my hands.” (2 Timothy 1:6). There’s a gift of God in every Christian. Peter calls it the gift of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:38). This gift is the panacea for every sickness. It’s a life-giving, sickness-destroying gift.

The way to put the power of this gift to work, as Paul said, is by stirring it up. The healing anointing of the Holy Ghost that we all carry will be dormant in our lives unless we stir it up. It’s like having the world’s best doctor at your disposal, yet you refuse to go meet him when you need him. Speaking in tongues stirs up the power of God and it’s far better than what any medical doctor on earth could give you. Meditating on the scriptures stirs up this healing power of the Holy Ghost. Also, speaking faith-filled words declaring your healing stirs up the healing power of God in you.

You need to get to work and kill every sickness that’s trying to kill you. Let the Spirit have full course in your body and let it fulfill its ministry in your life while you earnestly anticipate the day of redemption where no sickness or disease can ravage your body any longer.

© 2017 Matthew Joseph


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    • celafoe profile image

      charlie 3 months ago from From Kingdom of God living on Planet earth. between the oceans

      Excellent article. And I see here you did explain the need for the Holy Spirit. Good Work