ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Advantages and benefits of wearing swim caps for recreational and competitive swimmers

Updated on May 23, 2012

Should I wear a swim cap? Do swim caps really keep your hair dry? Should kids wear swim caps while swimming? Should swim caps be used in competitive swimming only? Why do some people put on double swim caps? Do bathing caps really protect long hair? Should I even bother getting used to the feeling of wearing a swim cap? Let's answer all these questions as we look at top advantages and benefits of wearing swim caps for men, women, boys and girls.

1) Swim caps protect hair from chlorinated water

While open hair like this can make for a great picture, constant exposure to chlorine can make hair dry and brittle.
While open hair like this can make for a great picture, constant exposure to chlorine can make hair dry and brittle. | Source

One of the most important benefits of wearing swim caps from a recreational swimming point of view is that they protect your hair from chlorine. Habitual swimmers will tell you the feeling of dryness in hair after a swim in the pool. That is because of the chlorinated water as chlorine strips hair of the essential oils and moisture, from top to the root.

This effect of chlorine on hair removes the protective layers from hair strands, making your hair susceptible to damage and discoloration. Protection from chlorinated water is also one of the reasons besides performance issues, why competitive swimmers wear swim caps.

2) Swim caps offer protection from sun damage to hair

Swim caps protect hair by shielding it from damaging sun rays. This is a boon for anyone who spends considerable amount of time swimming, let alone competitive swimmers. Even recreational swimmers who want to stop hair damage should wear a swim cap.

The cosmetic industry is abuzz with shampoo and other expensive hair care products which contain SPF equivalents and other elements which protect hair from sun damage. You may be using bottle after bottle of these expensive lotions and creams before or after your swim sessions. But there is nothing better than simply putting on a swim cap as a permanent solution to protect your hair from sun damage.

3) Swim caps reduce drag and friction

Competitive swimmers wear swim caps because better fluid dynamics can shave off milliseconds which could very well mean the difference between a gold and silver medal. In picture is Michael Phelps.
Competitive swimmers wear swim caps because better fluid dynamics can shave off milliseconds which could very well mean the difference between a gold and silver medal. In picture is Michael Phelps.

Official Speedo swimwear and accessories at Amazon.com

A good fitting swim cap fits around the head without any wrinkles, making it very efficient from a fluid dynamics point of view. In simple words a swim cap helps a swimmer to move through the water quicker by offering less resistance as compared to having open hair.

Competitive swimmers like to use every possible trick to get an edge over their competitors. Surface resistance or drag caused by things like body hair can significantly slow a swimmer down, when even milliseconds can be the difference between a win and a loss. Most competitive swimmers reduce this friction by removing body hair, applying lotions, wearing body suits and of course, swim caps.

4) Double swim caps keep your hair dry and head warm

Swimwear companies will rant and rave about how their swim caps can keep your hair dry. However most swimmers experience that a little water always manages to seep inside. Having said that, high quality swim caps from reputed swimwear manufacturers like Speedo do a great job at keeping hair dry, or at least drier than other low quality products.

There are cases when people may have certain hair conditions which require them to avoid wetting hair as far as possible. If you are in such a situation or you don't like getting your hair wet at all, you may want to consider putting on double swim caps. In simple words, it means wearing two swim caps for a tighter fit which seals hair from getting wet.

Competitive swimmers who take part in open water swimming competitions often wear double swim caps to keep their heads warm and protected from freezing water temperatures.

5) Swim caps keep hair in place

Swim caps allow swimmers to focus on swimming rather than having to worry about hair getting in the face.
Swim caps allow swimmers to focus on swimming rather than having to worry about hair getting in the face. | Source

The last thing swimmers want to worry about is having hair in their face, eyes, nose and mouth. Out of place hair can be a pain to deal with while lapping up and this applies especially to women and girls who have long hair. Hair in the face can be a distraction, hair on the nose can cause difficulty breathing and hair in the eyes can be a very irritating feeling.

A swim cap will hold all the hair in place and will not let your hair distract or interrupt you while swimming. Additionally, you may also be practicing good swimming pool etiquette by wearing a swim cap as it stops your hair falling out in the pool. This benefit of swim caps applies to competitive as well as recreational swimmers.

6) Swim caps keep your goggles' headstrap from pulling on your hair

While swimwear companies may not explicitly put this down as an advantage of wearing swim caps, any swimmer will tell you how painful it is when the headstrap of swim goggles tug or pull the hair. Recreational swimmers, especially girls who have long hair can avoid this fiasco by wearing swim goggles over swim caps leaving no chance of the headstrap becoming entangled with the hair. This benefit of wearing swim caps is for recreational swimmers. Competitive swimmers are likely to wear swim caps over the headstrap of swim goggles to reduce drag and friction.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)