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Gatorade

Updated on March 1, 2010

Gatorade

The world's most researched Energy Drink

Having had a long association with the "science of victory" and as the world's most researched energy drink, Gatorade had its beginnings in the early 1960s at the University of Florida.

Gatorade can be found on the sidelines of many sporting events and is even used on building sites down under!

If you have a physically demanding job (especially in the sun) or if you play a sport, you will know the relief that comes with taking Gatorade.

One can barely imagine a time in sport before Gatorade but in the 1960s, Ray Graves - coach for the Florida University's football team The Gators - spoke to the team doctor of his frustration over the performance of his players.

The team doctor happened to be an associate of Robert Cade, a medical researcher at the university and along with Dana Shires, Harry James Free, and Alejandro de Quesada the research team discovered why Gator players "wilt'.

The loss of fluid and electrolytes through sweat and the loss of carbohydrates for energy were the primary reasons as these were not being replaced during demanding physical exercise.

The team developed the first mixture of Gatorade containing sodium, sugar,potassium, phosphate and lemon juice and The Gators finished the season with unexpected wins over more highly fancied opponents.

Their next season was even better with the school winning the Orange Bowl for the first time ever in 1967.

As The Gators gave the credit to Gatorade, the word soon spread beyond the State of Florida and other college football teams began to adopt Gatorade. In fact, not using Gatorade was likened to playing with only 10 men on the field.

It wasn't long before Gatorade entered the NFL and again, Ray Graves, The Gators coach played a part.

In 1969, he persuaded the Kansas City Chiefs to use Gatorade during their training camps in the hot Missouri sun. They ended up keeping it on their sidelines for the rest of the season and against the odds, beat the Minnesota Vikings at Super Bowl IV.

More and more NFL teams adopted Gatorade and in 1983, it became the official drink of the NFL.

Gatorade has continued to spread as an energy drink and is now used in many more sporting codes including the NBA and PGA.

The Gatorade Sports Science Institute was established in 1988. Situated in Barrington, Illinois, the GSSI is at the forefront of sport's research and it's stated mission is " to share current information and expand knowledge on sports nutrition and exercise science that enhance the performance and well-being of athletes. "

The Institutes website can be found here.

The Gatorade website can be found here.

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    • Springboard profile image

      Springboard 

      8 years ago from Wisconsin

      ...and PepsiCo, the company that now owns the brand, has certainly cornered the market with the popular sports drink. It's still on top. Though I secretly enjoy Powerade more...but ONLY because when I worked for Coca-Cola I had more access to it, and drank it more, and so it's possible I just acquired a taste for it over Gatorade. Though, as a company, I like PepsiCo much better.

    • psychicdog.net profile imageAUTHOR

      psychicdog.net 

      8 years ago

      @LadyE Not sold in the UK? Maybe it's just not hot enough in summer to make it worthwhile. During demanding physical exercise in hot weather it works wonders.

      @Stan I'd have to agree and look how long it's been on the shelves.

    • Lady_E profile image

      Elena 

      8 years ago from London, UK

      Sounds very effective - I hope they start selling it in the UK.

      Ps. Thanks for your comments on my Tweeter Hub. I have edited the Hub to include your concerns. Best Wishes.

    • Stan Fletcher profile image

      Stan Fletcher 

      8 years ago from Nashville, TN

      Long live Gatorade! There have been many imitators, but only one original. Interesting read.

    • psychicdog.net profile imageAUTHOR

      psychicdog.net 

      8 years ago

      It's not a bad taste either, eh Soni, for something that keeps you going?

    • soni2006 profile image

      Rajinder Soni 

      8 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Yes, I have been drinking gatorade as a sports drink since its launch in India a few years back. It's really refreshing and nourishing when I am totally fatigued.

    • psychicdog.net profile imageAUTHOR

      psychicdog.net 

      8 years ago

      Best time to drink it, Money Glitch. I too have found it definitely works on those summer days when you are pushing yourself physically. Thanks for dropping by.

    • Money Glitch profile image

      Money Glitch 

      8 years ago from Texas

      This is great info on the history of Gatorade. Never knew that is how it came into existence. Interesting, I must say I only drink the stuff after being outside on hot summer days, however, it does seem to work well for such occasions. Thanks for sharing your insight. :)

    • psychicdog.net profile imageAUTHOR

      psychicdog.net 

      8 years ago

      You might be gifted with a special gift of being able to stare at product names Nicomp. A very rare and wonderful gift which could prove very useful in the universe. I'd suggest develop this rather than try to deny it!

    • nicomp profile image

      nicomp really 

      8 years ago from Ohio, USA

      @psychicdog.net: My humble research consists of staring at the product name. ;)

    • psychicdog.net profile imageAUTHOR

      psychicdog.net 

      8 years ago

      I'm sorry to shatter your illusions, Nicomp; but not according to my humble research.

    • nicomp profile image

      nicomp really 

      8 years ago from Ohio, USA

      I always thought it came from squeezing gators!

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