ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Powered Parachutes

Updated on July 9, 2017
Source

Powered Parachute

Do you want a tiny aircraft that can fit in your garage and take off from most anyplace? If so the powered parachute (PPC) may be just what you are looking for.

This small aircraft has a motor and propeller at your back and a parachute overhead. They fly rather slow at just about 26 to 32 (40-60km) miles an hour.

Flying the powered parachute is easy to master and safer than most aircraft. The PPC can fly low just over the tree tops or just above the fence line, so exploring your surroundings is better than what you could get by flying really fast in your typical airplane. Of course, you won’t go anywhere fast in this tiny aircraft, but if your desire is to fly around the area you live in and just enjoy the view then the PPC is the way to go.

The advantages of the powered parachute over other aircraft are many. They are easy to store and you can keep it on your property. Also very simple to fly with just a short amount of training. And if the engine quits you can safely glide to the ground with your parachute holding you up.

You don’t need a lot of maintenance and can just take off on your own without any help from others on the ground.

The PPC is easy to haul. You just need a small trailer or extend the back of your pickup for easy transport.


Tips for Buying a Powered Parachute

  • Before you buy and fly your PPC be sure to get the suitable training with an experienced instructor. You only need between five and ten hours of instruction and this will give you the experience you need to avoid becoming a statistic.
  • Powered Parachutes are one of the less expensive aircraft that you can find. They typically start out at around $5,000 for a new one to up to $25,000 if you want all the bells and whistles.
  • Your parachute should be made out of the best material that won’t rip and is less sensitive to heat. Examples to look for are terylene and nylon.
  • Do you have someone that would like to go flying with you? If so a two seater would be best. These are more expensive but worth it if you love company.
  • Choose the type of Parachute wing that is safe. The shape determines your speed. The rectangular shape is safer but slow while the elliptical shape wing is faster but more dangerous and should be used by experienced pilots only.
  • A cheaper wood propeller is heavier but can be repairable. So this is a good one to start out with in case you have to replace it often.
  • The more expensive lightweight composite propeller is quieter and well balanced and can be purchased once you get more experience.
  • Ask around before you buy. Interview instructors and other PPC pilots for their recommendations. They can give you the best advice.
  • Renting is a good way to save money if you don’t fly much. Once you get your training you can check around and see if there is a rental place close to your home.
  • Consider taking a 16-hour class to become a FAA certified inspector and repairman. You would be able to do your own yearly inspection instead of paying someone else. Also, people would be paying you to inspect and repair their PPC. Might be a good part time job.

Two Seat Trike Powered Parachute

Source

Powered Parachutes for Sale

There are other things to consider before buying your powered parachute.

Once you decide to purchase make sure your family is happy with your decision. Are you flying alone? Does your family want to fly with you? This will determine if you should invest in a more costly two seater.

What is the weather like in your area? A PPC can be flown throughout the year, but you have to stay out of windy and stormy conditions. If you live in the south you would probably have more flying days than in the northeast.

There is an advantage in training on the same type of PPC that you plan to buy. This way once you get your own you can just take off and won’t have to learn how a different Powered Parachute operates.

Foot Launch, Quad or Trike

Foot Launch. The pilot launches into the air with his feet. He runs a little and then lifts off. This is less expensive than the quad or trike since you don’t need as much gear, and you can launch from anywhere. You will need to be in good physical shape.

Quad or Trike. Has 3 or 4 wheels. You will need more gear but it is not as physically demanding and you can get to your launch place easier. You don’t have to carry everything.

The video below explains all this in great detail, so if you are interested in learning more about the differences and want to see these options in action, take a look.

Powered Parachute Flying Handbook

Powered Parachute Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-29)
Powered Parachute Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-29)

I like this book for answering most of all your questions that you might have on Powered Parachutes. Even experienced pilots will learn something new.

 

Paramotor & Powered Paragliding Buyer's Guide Part 1

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)