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How do you calculate ERA in baseball?

  1. KevinTimothy profile image82
    KevinTimothyposted 5 years ago

    How do you calculate ERA in baseball?

    How do you determine ERA in baseball?  Is there an ERA formula?

  2. CriticalMessage profile image79
    CriticalMessageposted 5 years ago

    The amount of runs caused by either hits or walks, (not by errors) per 9 innings a pitcher pitches.

    3 runs given up (without fielding errors) per 9 innings pitched would give the pitcher an Earned Run Average (ERA) of 3.00

    1. KevinTimothy profile image82
      KevinTimothyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, sir. Well stated.

  3. sandonia profile image84
    sandoniaposted 5 years ago

    I want to modify CriticalMessage's response a little. To be an earned run, the batter must have become a runner and later scored through "errorless" play. Per the MLB rules for official scorers, the scorer should "reconstruct the inning without the errors (which exclude catcher's interference) and passed balls ... in determining which bases would have been reached by runners had there been errorless play" (Official Rules 10.6).

    For example, the first batter reaches first base by an error. The second batter hits a double and the first batter advances to third. The third batter hits a double and both of the first and second batters score. The pitcher will be charged with one earned run and two runs allowed. The one earned run will count in the calculation of ERA.

    The Official Rules has a number of examples which describe a variety of situations in determining which runs are earned (ER) and which are simply runs allowed (R). I'll include the link below.

    http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/official_info/of … rer_10.jsp

    1. KevinTimothy profile image82
      KevinTimothyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks, I appreciate the reference.

    2. CriticalMessage profile image79
      CriticalMessageposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That was no modification other than just more detail on what I had already described for I did include the description (not by errors)... So where was your modification to my description for providing more details of the same event is not modifying.

    3. KevinTimothy profile image82
      KevinTimothyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Either way you both taught me a lot about calculating the ERA in baseball.

    4. sandonia profile image84
      sandoniaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Runs scored on hits or walks are not necessarily earned runs. The proper calculation of ERA is Earned Runs times 9 divided by innings pitched or (ER*9) / IP.

  4. KeenanEM profile image60
    KeenanEMposted 5 years ago

    The previous descriptions are all correct, but here's a "formula" that you asked about:

    Take the amount of earned runs allowed by a pitcher and divide that by innings pitched. Keep in mind that some people write fractions of innings as decimals (for example, 6 1/3 innings is sometimes written as 6.1). Then take the number you get and multiply that by 9. This will give you a pitchers exact ERA over any period of time you desire to know.

    The formula basically looks like this:

    Earned Runs / Innings Pitched x 9 = ERA

 
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