ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

10 Fashion Trends for Fall 2014

Updated on August 6, 2014

Sixties Style

From left: Versace, Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Valentino and Saint Laurent.
From left: Versace, Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Valentino and Saint Laurent. | Source

Get ready to head to the thrift stores or raid your grandma's closet because mod style is back in.Women's fashion during the early 60's resembled the conservative, classy, and refined style of the 1950s while the mid-to-late 60's introduced the mini-skirt for the first time.Style icons during that period were London model, Twiggy, Audrey Hepburn, and First Lady, Jackie Kennedy.

The wardrobe staple during the 1960s (aside from the mini-skirt) were baby doll dresses, as seen on the runway this past winter. Baby doll dresses were designed with round necklines, fitted waists, A-line, and were found in a variety of prints and colors (bold and pastels).

There were many acclaimed designers that presented their own unique interpretations in honor of the fashion of the 1960s.


Bird-like Prints

 From left: Giles, Valentino, Markus Lupfer, Alberta Ferretti and Marchesa Voyage.
From left: Giles, Valentino, Markus Lupfer, Alberta Ferretti and Marchesa Voyage. | Source

Animal prints have always been considered trendy. We have seen leopard print, zebra print, giraffe print----- the Fall 2014 fashion runway this year was flying with birds. From Valentino to Marchesa, hummingbird and finch-like prints were soaring.

Each designer that decided to take this trend 'under their wing' so-to-speak, had a different and unique interpretation. Some decided to pair the print with bright, contrasting, bold colors; others decided to use richer hues, and others decided to use it on casual knitwear.

The statements remain simple, yet beautiful.

Crafty & Gothic

From left: Mark and Estel, Emporio Armani, Marios Schwab, Katie Gallagher and Erdem.
From left: Mark and Estel, Emporio Armani, Marios Schwab, Katie Gallagher and Erdem. | Source

If you can recall movies such as The Craft, then this style should trigger your memories. Although Gothic makeup was trendy last fall, I cannot recall when Gothic style was considered "in" besides the 90s. If you are bold enough to try this trend, make sure to pick up a vampy, fall, statement lipstick.

You can style it up either all Gothic, grungy, or even get in-tune with your inner Vampira.

  • Don gowns with flared sleeves
  • Black, black, and more black
  • Velvet dresses
  • Satin evening gowns.

Accessorize:

  • Gold necklaces (think S&M) or elegant chokers
  • Edgy leather boots or spiked pumps
  • Ankle-length leather or fur trench coats
  • Lace hosiery or clothing with medieval cut-outs

The options are endless.

Knit-wear

From left: Stella McCartney, Marc Jacobs, Missoni, Calvin Klein and Hermès.
From left: Stella McCartney, Marc Jacobs, Missoni, Calvin Klein and Hermès. | Source

Fall is the season of sweater weather. This year, designers proved that layers of knit do not necessary mean it has to be bulky. With the correct tailoring, knitwear has transformed from being too frumpy and casual to chic and stylish. Designers like Stella McCartney, Marc Jacobs, and Hermes took a monotone approach, while other designers layered different colored knits on top of the other.

The easiest way to achieve this look is to browse the racks for sweater dresses.

Bright Colors

 From left: Miu Miu, Gucci, Christopher Kane, Marc Jacobs and Tod's.
From left: Miu Miu, Gucci, Christopher Kane, Marc Jacobs and Tod's. | Source
From left: Givenchy, Vionnet, Altuzarra, Moncler Gamme Rouge and BCBG Max Azria.
From left: Givenchy, Vionnet, Altuzarra, Moncler Gamme Rouge and BCBG Max Azria. | Source

Color, color, and more color. Designers this year decided that they wanted to showcase not one, but two color trends: pastels and neon. The bright yet muted pastel colors followed the 60s modern trend, showcasing knee-length baby doll and shift dresses.

The neon colors were utilized in the couture athletic-wear trend. Pops of neon were spread throughout the collections as seen in the collections by Givenchy, Vionnet, Altuzarra, Moncler Gamme Rouge, and BCBG Max Azria.

Mid-length Sheer

From left: Fendi, Sacai, No. 21, Michael Kors and Donna Karan.
From left: Fendi, Sacai, No. 21, Michael Kors and Donna Karan. | Source

The midi is a style that features a skirt/dress that ends at the knee but is covered in sheer netting that falls to the ankles. This season, designers went the dark and edgier route: pairing their midis with sweaters, belted knits, layered outerwear, and dark hues.

Wrap It Up

From left: Roberto Cavalli, DKNY, Burberry Prorsum, Etro and Leonard.
From left: Roberto Cavalli, DKNY, Burberry Prorsum, Etro and Leonard. | Source
From left: Max Mara, Marques'Almeida, Leonard, Céline and Moschino.
From left: Max Mara, Marques'Almeida, Leonard, Céline and Moschino. | Source

Since these two trends were so similar to one another, I decided to adopt them together into one full category instead of two.

If these trends allude to what this fall season is going to be all about, it is layers, layers, and more layers. Designers including Roberto Cavalli, DKNY, Burberry, Eltro, and Leonard featured a collection of wraps. Think blankets and plush fabrics. The patterns consisted of earthy tones: some were styled in a tribal, Native American fashion while others went the sleeker route.

The second array of photos featured long coats with knots at the waist. My favorites would have to be Max Mara, Leonard, and Celine. They featured their coats in a sleek, classy fashion.

  • Max Mara featured a tan felted trench with a leather knot, chic glasses, and a black dress underneath.
  • Celine went for the plush fur, cinched off at the waist, and a model with sleek black hair. Surprisingly I think the black platforms were an amazing choice.
  • Leonard went more colorful, featuring rich crimson and burnt orange colors that complimented the entire look.

Not a fan of the denim on top of denim and bed head look from Marques'Almeida, and I think Moschino's furry robe ensemble was tacky and resembled more of "The Flash" than sass.

Fairytale-Esque

From left: Fendi, Maxime Simoëns, CG, Cacharel and Jean Paul Gaultier.
From left: Fendi, Maxime Simoëns, CG, Cacharel and Jean Paul Gaultier. | Source

It would appear that the inspiration for other designers was the notion of fantasy. Although the collections were vastly different, they all seemed to share similar elements.

  • Fendi- this first gown resembles a starry sky; the rich fabric and ombre shades of black and gray give the dress a flowing movement.
  • Maxime Simoens- the second look featured above is very futuristic; I absolutely love the sharp lines, the fitted leather pants, the chic belt, and the cropped, fitted blazer.
  • CG- A little mix of Star Wars and Game of Thrones, this all white ensemble is very angelic and ethereal; the sheer dress with the turtle neck revealed a the perfect amount of skin while leaving the rest to the imagination. If I could get rid of one thing it would be those metallic shoes.
  • Cacharel- the short shift dress features a galactic, outer space print which allows for a variety of different choices for accessories; paired with the black, hooded overcoat is both chic, new, futuristic, and simple.
  • Jean Paul Gaultier- although I could never pull it off, this look has to be my favorite. It would seem that the inspiration for this look came out of the Lord of the Rings trilogy. The green metallic outfit was a bit matchy matchy, but I love the hood. Very elfish.

Southwestern Chic

From left: Yang Li, Kenneth Cole Collection, Alexis Mabille, Tibi and Dion Lee.
From left: Yang Li, Kenneth Cole Collection, Alexis Mabille, Tibi and Dion Lee. | Source

Get ready to go back to the Wild Wild West (or channel your inner Buffalo Bill), because southwestern chic was all over the runway this year. Think comfort and elegant.

Staples for Southwestern Chic

  • Wide-brimmed black hats
  • Denim, wool, and felt-like fabrics
  • Blankets and ponchos
  • Layering different patterns and fabrics


Mixing and Matching

From left: Simonetta Ravizza, Topshop Unique, 3.1 Phillip Lim, Roksanda Ilincic and Salvatore Ferragamo.
From left: Simonetta Ravizza, Topshop Unique, 3.1 Phillip Lim, Roksanda Ilincic and Salvatore Ferragamo. | Source

It wouldn't be fall without an array of plush furs, but it would seem that some designers could not decide on a specific pattern, type of fur, or textile. Somehow, showcasing outfits mixed with a little bit of everything turned out to be incredibly elegant and edgy--- instead of a mixed up disaster.


Which Trend Would You Try?

See results

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Craan profile image

      Sheila Craan 

      4 years ago from Florida

      I love your hub, and I wish I owned all these clothes!

    • fashionbliss profile image

      Alita 

      4 years ago from Saint Paul, Minnesota

      Like your hub. I like to match all the time but I don't overdo it. I notice trends from the 60's and 70's are coming back. Check out this 90's look, for example, like Justin Bieber wearing MC Hammer Pants. I can't say I hate those pants but I can say I dislike them. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-21611...

    • profile image

      yuiyiuy9 

      4 years ago

      guyyyyyyg

    • Sami Hanson profile imageAUTHOR

      Sami 

      4 years ago from Kansas

      Hezekiah- Oh my gosh that's crazy! But then again, Tokyo is considered one of the fashion capitals of the world, so maybe I shouldn't be so surprised. Even if something goes out of style, always wear what you want!

      IslandBites- Thanks!

      sparklingcrystal- I love knitwear too, as long as it isn't itchy. That always makes for an uncomfortable day! I wish I had your confidence because I do not think I could try mixing and matching. You go, girly! :)

    • sparklingcrystal profile image

      sparklingcrystal 

      4 years ago from Manila

      I love knit wear and I also love exploring different kinds of trends and do mix and matching. It's always great to find articles that mainly focuses on trends and styles. Voted up!

    • IslandBites profile image

      IslandBites 

      4 years ago from Puerto Rico

      Nice hub. Vote up.

    • Hezekiah profile image

      Hezekiah 

      4 years ago from Japan

      Here in Japan, fashion comes in and out so quickly, they end up just throwing clothes away. Especially Tokyo.

    • Sami Hanson profile imageAUTHOR

      Sami 

      4 years ago from Kansas

      Thanks, lovely! Hey as long as you own it, that's all that counts!

    • profile image

      swilliams 

      4 years ago

      Great article Sami! I chose mixing and matching because I can never find anything to match, I don't know what happen to my wardrobe at times. Voted up!

    • Sami Hanson profile imageAUTHOR

      Sami 

      4 years ago from Kansas

      Oh I know, right! The Mix and Match trend is more "hobo chic" for a lack of a proper term. It's like walking out of the house undecided on what color, texture, and style they wanted to wear that day. And do not let your age define how you dress. If you want to try a style, I say go for it. Tailor it to your taste and comfort, and rock the hell out of it! However, if you love wearing those mom jeans, you sure as hell can rock those as well. But never settle for dressing in ways that make you feel less than beautiful. Thank you for always taking the time to stay updated on my hubs! Much appreciated, love! xo

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 

      4 years ago from USA

      Although I'd love to try the 1960s style, my teenage daughter reminds me that my time has passed. I'll stick to my mom jeans but will be uber jealous. The mix and match style looks like someone just rolled out of bed and grabbed the first thing they saw in their closet. Thanks for keeping us informed on the styles.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)