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Explore the Healing Qualities of Rose Oil: 3 Interesting Uses for Everyday Ailments

Updated on May 2, 2012
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When someone mentions a rose, we immediately think of love and romance. This flower is not only the symbol for romance, but also contains a very precious oil with potent healing properties. Rose oil is best known for its scent, but few of us may know of its healing and soothing qualities. It’s been used for a number of years in both Ayurvedic and other alternative forms of medicine.

The Production Process

Distillation is used to manufacture rose oil and this means the the production process is labor intensive and painstakingly slow. Experts suggest that manufacturing just one pound of rose oil will mean using 10 000 pounds of rose petals. It’s easy to see why this oil often carries a much higher price tag, but it’s well worth the investment. Rose water is a byproduct of the distillation process and can also be used as part of a natural skin care regimen.

Rose Oil in Aromatherapy

This oil not only smells devine but also has an antidepressant effect. It is said to improve mental alertness and may also bring on pleasant dreams. It may be one of the reasons why it is often used as an aromatic remedy for insomnia. It’s easy to use rose oil, and adding it to an oil burner or diffuser may be all that’s needed to help defuse the tensions of a stressful day. It can also be added to a warm bath to help relaxation and ensure a good night’s sleep.

Healing Qualities of Rose Oil

This oil is not only soothing to the emotions but is anti bacterial, anti inflammatory and antiseptic as well. It also has a natural stimulant effect on the skin, so it makes a wonderful tonic and can be used to cleanse the skin and treat various skin problems.

Rose Oil in Alternative Medicine

Rose oil is best known for its anti depressant effect in alternative medicine, but this is not where it’s functions end. It has also been used to treat both male and female reproductive problems. Irregular periods, impotency, and menopause include some of the problems treated with rose oil in alternative medicine. Other ailments that are treated with this oil include asthma, hay fever, nausea, and even sore throats. In Ayurvedic medicine rose oil is used to balance the digestive and endocrine systems.

For many of us rose oil is all about its scent, when in actual fact it’s a potent healing oil and can be used in a number of ways to take care of anything from emotional strain to skin problems and menopausal symtoms. Adding it to homemade skin care products adds healing and soothing properties in addition to its wonderful and luxurious scent.

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    • profile image

      KDuBarry03 

      6 years ago

      Your welcome, Emeraldgreen, and wow! Rose Water definitely sounds to be very useful in a tea therapy repertoire. It would be very insightful and helpful to write a hub about it! :)

    • Emeraldgreen21 profile imageAUTHOR

      Atell Rohlandt 

      6 years ago from South Africa

      Thanks for your comment KduBarry. Rose water as far as I know has both health and skin care benefits. It's an excellent astringent so it's a great toner and is used in many skin care products. It's also useful for sore throats and rose water tea can be used to treat a number of illnesses including ulcers, circulation problems, and heart problems amongst other things. I might write a hub about it, because the topic is fairly indepth.

    • profile image

      KDuBarry03 

      6 years ago

      Hmm interesting, and what kind of effects does rosewater have on the body that are similar/different to rose oil?

    • Emeraldgreen21 profile imageAUTHOR

      Atell Rohlandt 

      6 years ago from South Africa

      That's an interesting question KDuBarry03. I'm assuming roses in tea would have the same effect as rosewater (not rose oil). Rose petals contain so little rose oil that you may have to drink thousands of cups of tea with petals in it to get a similar effect. Investing in a small bottle of rose oil and using it as part of an aromatherapy regime may be more helpful in the long run.

    • profile image

      KDuBarry03 

      6 years ago

      wow this is definitely interesting! I'm gonna have to try this out. I do have to ask this: What about using Roses in Tea? Does it have the same effect as Rose Oil?

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