ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Geocache Containers for Great Hides

Updated on April 5, 2016

Sturdy and Safe

Traditional Lock-n-Lock  Geocache Container
Traditional Lock-n-Lock Geocache Container

Damaged, Exposed Cache

Damaged Geocache Container
Damaged Geocache Container

Qualities of a Good Geocache Container

Geocache containers range in size, shape and color. A carefully chosen container can assist geocache newbies to make a find or can pose a more challenging search for the geoaching veteran.

The techno-adventure known as GPS geocaching involves using a GSP device to locate hidden treasure. This "treasure", known as the geocache or simply the cache, must be concealed in some form of geocache container. The type of holder utilized has a huge influence on the seeker's experience.

A good container has these qualities:

  1. It is large enough to contain a small log book at the very least. Larger repositories have room for swag (goodies) as well as the geocache log.The log is a book or roll of paper that finders sign when they discover the geocache.
  2. It must be sturdy enough to withstand the elements and sufficiently sealed to keep the contents dry during wet weather.
  3. Ideally, the geocaching container should be camouflaged in some way so as to pose a challenge for those who seek.

In the photo at the top right, you see a safe and sturdy receptacle, one that keeps its logbook and swag safe.

In the photo below that, you see the results of a poorly constructed vessel. Apparently the holder consisted of a lightweight, black plastic bag, which tore open over time. In turn, the black plastic bag contained two lightweight zip-lock bags which deteriorated and opened to scatter the swag contained within.The swag was found lying loose around the cache's hiding place. The log book was missing.

A Cache Owner (the hider) is smart to invest in a good geocache container that will hold up over time.

Many types are available.

Unless otherwise indicated, photo credits are to June Campbell.

The Lock-n-Lock Geocache Container

The Lock-n-Lock is arguably the most common type of geoache container. Lock-n-Locks are simply plastic boxes with lids that lock on all four sides. Lock-n-Locks come in various sizes, ranging from small to large. They are usually sturdy and built to keep the contents dry, providing of course, that the finder replaces the cover as it should be after finding a cache.

The picture at the top of this page shows a medium sized Lock-n-Lock container open and displaying its contents. You can see the log book that people have been signing, and a some of the swag.

Notice also that the top of the box has been painted in shades of green, brown and gray. This camouflage makes it fit well with the leaves and vegetation that surrounds it and with the grayish black rock that partially covers this cache when it is hidden.

Nano Geocache Container In Hand
Nano Geocache Container In Hand

Nano Geocache Containers

Nano geocache containers are tiny. Available in various colours, they can hang from a tree, be tucked into a hollow log, sandwiched in among rocks, or otherwise hidden from view. These nanos are popular among geocachers, but they can be inordinately difficult to find. The tiny size makes it very easy to miss them when searching in a forest or beach or park or other setting.

A nano has room for nothing other than a tiny strip of paper that serves as a log.

Ammo Box or Field Box Cache Container
Ammo Box or Field Box Cache Container | Source
Flat, Magnetic Geocache Container on Pole
Flat, Magnetic Geocache Container on Pole

Large Geocache Containers

The box, can or holder can be as large as you want. You are limited only by your ability to carry, transport and camouflage the item.

The container in the picture is known as an ammo can (ammunition can) or field can. It's large, study, and when well camouflaged, an excellent hide.

Flat, Magnetic Geocache Containers

Can you identify the cache in the picture to the right?

This particular cache baffled me when I was new to geocaching. I visited this location at least eight times before I clued in.

The cache is the flat, magnetic sticker with the three letters on it (G6S). I saw this and assumed it was something put there by City workers.

Once you have seen a geocache container of this type, you can identify them readily.

These innocent looking flat containers are magnetied so they can stick firmly in place. They can resemble utility plate covers, for example, or can be in any color or décor most likely to fool the unwary geocacher.

Magnetic Box Geocache Container
Magnetic Box Geocache Container

Uniquely Shaped Repositories

Bone-Shaped Geocache Container
Bone-Shaped Geocache Container

Magnetic Box Geocache Container

These magnetic boxes are constructed with a strong magnet inside. This magnet allows the Cache Owner to affix the little box inside, on or under a metal structure.

This particular one was found in the top, inside part of a community newspaper box located on a busy city sidewalk.

As you can see, the front slides back displaying a small log book inside a zip-lock bag for protection. Possibly this container could hold a small pencil or pen.

Uniquely Shaped Geocache Containers

Cache owners are not limited to box-like holders. Instead, they can opt to make or purchase a container to work with a specific theme or to create a desired impression.

The fake bone geocache container to the right was found in a cache that honored dogs. The Cache Owner hinted that seekers should "consider where a dog would bury a bone".

Other uniquely shaped containers that I have found include a fake rock that opens to display its cache, a ceramic frog that includes an invitation to kiss a frog, and a child's toy boat that contains a log book and tiny swag.

Geocaching,com lists all caches and indicates the type and size of the holders These uniquely shaped geocache containers are shown with a question mark (?) to indicate that they are not boxlike.


Magnetic Geocaching Bolts

Cache Advance Silver Magnetic Geocaching Bolt
Cache Advance Silver Magnetic Geocaching Bolt

These magnetic bolts are popular geocaches in my neck of the woods. Extra devious cache owners take care to rust them and distress them before putting them in their sneaky location.

 

Devious Nature Geocache Containers

Some geocache containers are just plain devious. Geocaching.com refers to them as "devious nature."

Imagine a rusty bolt hiding in the underside of a small bridge. Or a similar rusty bolt tucked into a space in the railing of an ocean pier. How about large blades of fake grass? Or fake chewing gum? Or fake dog poop? Or fake logs (of the forest variety)? Or fake pine cones? Or fake pennies or coins? Or birdhouses containing a cache? Or even Halloween skeletons that contain a geocache.

It's just plain scary what some people can come up with.

Grass Sprout Cache Container
Grass Sprout Cache Container

Grass Sprout Cache Container

Check out the cache container to the right. This "sprout of grass" cache container is extremely difficult to identify unless you know about their existence. Picture this tucked into a grassy area, along with a bunch of other grasses.

This one was found stuck into a large nursery tree stump. A "nursery" stump or "nursery tree" is one on which other trees are growing. In this example, the nursery stump was huge,and had two trees growing on it, one at each end. It also had a number of ferns and other greenery sprouting from it. This sprout cache was tucked in so the log part was concealed.

The weird thing about these caches is that once you notice them, they are obvious, but before that you can stare at them for hours and not realize what you are seeing.

Poll: What Size Container do you Like?

What's Your Favorite Size of Geocache Container?

See results

© 2014 June Campbell

Please Leave a Comment

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • DrBillSmithWriter profile image

      William Leverne Smith 2 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Very useful information. Thank you for sharing. Started Geocaching in Feb 2002… still have several active that folks visit each week. Amazing how popular it continues to be! ;-)

    • profile image

      beliza 2 years ago

      Very interesting!

    • Joyce Mann profile image

      Joyce T. Mann 2 years ago from Bucks County, Pennsylvania USA

      Geocahing is something I have never done but it does looks like fun!

    • Sandyspider profile image

      Sandy Mertens 2 years ago from Wisconsin, USA

      Good information on geocache containers.

    • RonElFran profile image

      Ronald E. Franklin 2 years ago from Mechanicsburg, PA

      I know nothing of geocaching, and I'm sure it's something I'll never do. But I enjoyed seeing all the devious containers you show.

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 2 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      Its not for everyone, Ron. Some of us are addicted from the start but it doesn't appeal to everybody.

    • profile image

      user 9 months ago

      Great article but the picture of the damged cache is actually a baggie and marijuana pipe....might wanna change that :)

    Click to Rate This Article