ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

How can the Raspberry Pi be used?

Updated on July 13, 2016
Source

A few months ago, I wrote an article on how the Raspberry Pi could be used, however now it has been out for a while, I have found some fantastic examples of how it has been used. There have been a few small scale projects going on so far, and I expect that these will come together to create something amazing. I will put these as simply as possible, to avoid jargon, and allow anyone to understand this.

So, here are a few of the projects/ideas I have seen:

Webcam system

Webcam system

This was created with the aim to be able to see different parts of somebody’s house, using webcams, with the images/video being displayed on a screen. Although it ran at only one frame per second, this could be improved to become a fully functional security system, showing you all parts of your house – without the high cost. The only major cost it would take is time, especially if you aren’t sure what you are doing.

The reason the Pi is useful for this, instead of a normal computer, is that you can keep the Pi on overnight if you want, which won’t take up much electricity, whereas a desktop PC or a laptop would be significantly less efficient.

Voice recognition/Robot arm

Voice recognition/robot arm

Something much more complicated was created to show, still on a small scale, how the Raspberry Pi can be used. It used a £30 USB robotic arm, and a PlayStation Eye, which the maker says has a good quality microphone. A USB microphone would also work in its place. Both of these are connected to the Raspberry Pi, and when he tells the robotic arm to ‘Face left’, it faces the left. When he commands ‘Shoulder up’, the shoulder moves up. There is a slight delay, however this was a project created by one person, and voice recognition can be very heavy on programming.

The Raspberry Pi has a brilliant use in this, as it makes it portable – essentially allowing you to use this robotic arm wherever you go! This could lead to some very advanced robotics being related with the Raspberry Pi at their core – whether it is for precision in a science lab, or maybe someone simply wants to try out the Doctor Octopus arms.


Raspberry Rover

Raspberry Rover

This is fairly self-explanatory to a certain level, as it is a car (or a rover) connected to the Raspberry Pi, however the clever part is its ‘eye’. It has a webcam on the top of it, which is currently programmed to find anything green, and if it does, then the rover moves towards it – and if not, it searches around looking for it.

The Raspberry Pi’s use here is as always its portability – although in the video it isn’t very mobile, the Pi could be attached to the rover, allowing it to move as far out as it needs to go. Unless it had a very powerful engine/strong frame, this could never be done with a fully sized computer or laptop.

Although each of these innovations on the Pi is brilliant, they aren’t exciting alone. What is exciting is that if ideas like these are put to use together, then it is essentially homemade robotics. And compared to usual robotics, this is very simple to do, which means we could be entering an age of consumer robotics, which replaces simple electronics, to give us smarter, more precise appliances.

To give a simple idea, imagine merged these ideas, to allow the robotic arm to move, and find any green blocks – and when it does, it can pick them up, and collect them in a storage area.

Or maybe a security system could be developed which, in the rare case of someone breaking in, it automatically sticks out a robot arm with a Taser, and well, the rest would be history.

These ideas may seem stupid, or pointless, but they are a small percentage of the ideas that could be generated in the years or maybe even months to come. Hackers around the world finally have the chance to make things different, to actually make a change – and it starts with simple projects like these.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)