ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

How to Switch to Green Energy

Updated on July 7, 2012
Source

Although thermal solar energy is the first point of call on issues of green energy, there are actually other interesting forms of green energy so that the modality of switching to green energy should involve a decision on the most suitable source.

Before dealing with green energy proper, it is important that we delve into a simple fact that both geothermal and hydro-electric energy are actually sources of green energy. This is important in that an individual may define green energy as public energy supply. Here, the individual must investigate the energy source of electricity and heating gas before making a decision.


Swiching to Green Fuel

An easy way to switch to environmentally friendly fuel for your car is to make a decision on the type of fuel you would prefer before buying a car or vehicle. It is advisable to chose a car with diesel fuel engine when you are making a decision on your choice of car.

Diesel fuel engines are adaptable to bio-diesel so that the process of a switch to bio-fuel is simplified to picking up the next fuel pump.

Now, somebody is asking questions on the place of ethanol fuel! The response is that, the arguments against ethanol as a potent substitute for fossil fuels in terms of the amount of carbon(IV) oxide emitted is worthy of consideration. This is especially reasonable in that there is the evolution of large amount of carbon(IV) oxide during commercial production of ethanol.

Energy is also required for the distillation of ethanol so that the source of the heating fuel may be fossil fuel or electricity generated by fossil fuel.

But ethanol could be a reputable green fuel if the source of heat for distillation is from a clean energy source like solar energy.



Switching to Biogas Energy

Bio-gas generation for domestic purposes is one of the simplest way to switch to green energy. All that is required is a knowledge of how to construct a bio-gas digester.

A simple method of construction of bio-gas digester involves the construction of an airtight pit or container for the decomposition of house-hold organic wastes. The wastes may include toilet wastes and kitchen wastes. Here, the wastes are broken down by anaerobic microbes to mostly methane and the bi-products could be used as fertilizer for gardens thus limiting the use of inorganic fertilizers.

Switching to Wind Energy

Generation of power from wind energy is recently very easy in that there are an array of small wind turbines capable of meeting the energy needs of a home. Turbines can be ordered directly from a green energy company that specialises in the manufacture of wind turbines or may be constructed.

But before switching to wind energy it is important to consider whether your house is located in a place where the wind turbine could harvest enough wind necessary for a continuous supply of energy to your home.

Switching to Hydro-Electricity

Hydro-electricity was once a major source of electric energy. But hydro-electricity is usually associated with large dams with some environmental concerns. The construction of dams evidently lead to the destruction of large forest areas and distortion of aquatic life and natural water bodies. Another very important aspect of large dam project is the incidence of recurrent flooding.

But hydro-electricity could be a potent source of green energy if individuals are able to adopt micro turbines and utilise natural running water from rain, sewage and stagnant water in water logged areas.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • NC4Life078 profile image

      NC4Life078 4 years ago from United States of America

      I thought this Hub was interesting. I wish you would have talked about Solar energy aswell. Especially since your showing solar panels as your picture. Perhaps you could add it to add to the article.

    • nicomp profile image

      nicomp really 4 years ago from Ohio, USA

      How can solar energy possibly be 'green' when it impacts thousands of acres of pristine wilderness. How many species will be wiped out as we blanket the countryside with collectors? The entire technology is a function of surface area: the land is completely removed from any other useful purpose.

    • NC4Life078 profile image

      NC4Life078 4 years ago from United States of America

      Well said, I have never thought of that. I guess it could be compared to agriculture.

      But, you could place solar panels on pre-exsisting infastructures. In fact, there is a company based out of Ohio that constructs windmills ontop of homes. These windmills also contain solar panels for a more efficent energy process. Yes, its not "green" if you are destroying habbitats, but, you neglect their use on buildings that have already been constructed.

      Would you rather have millions of people using coal powerplants & nuclear power plants? Or would you rather have them use solar panels placed on their rooftops? I do realize that is not always an option, but, it is green in that sense.

      Lastly, I would like to quote you "Another very important aspect of large dam project is the incidence of recurrent flooding." Yes, specific dams can ruin habitats. Yet, some rivers and habitats still exsist today because of them. Dams control the flow of water which may have been dried up without them. Not to mention that they *Limit flooding.

      Don't limit your views to "good or bad" because some things are good like houses with solar panels, while solar farms *may disrupt habitats (which may be controversial because there are several deserts in the world that are uninhabitable by even bacteria, so it might behoove us to utilize a wasteland).

    • Chemistry Book profile image
      Author

      Chemistry Book 4 years ago

      You are right nicomp! questions are also on materials used in making the panels.

    • Chemistry Book profile image
      Author

      Chemistry Book 4 years ago

      NC4Life078 , It is actually a great Idea to install the panels on pre-existing structures. But am skeptical on the idea of using waste lands. What if there a no waste lands in the vicinity? Doers it imply that the panels are constructed in distant places? That would lead to wastage since some of the energy will be lost during transportation. Also, it may lead to further distruction of the ecosystem.

    • nicomp profile image

      nicomp really 4 years ago from Ohio, USA

      Wasteland? Do the animals living there consider it to be 'waste land'?

    • NC4Life078 profile image

      NC4Life078 4 years ago from United States of America

      Well, I am not a Solar Panel expert by any means. It is one reason I had hoped it to be apart of this hub. I naturally assume they would have to be constructed in the distance to be placed in these Abiotic zones.

      Operational Risk Management could be utilized to figure out if the benefits of Solar Energy would be worth some risk. Would this Solar Farm be more efficient and "green" than lets say a Nuclear Powerplant despite the negative effects?

      The definition that I am using as "Wasteland" is one that is Abiotic. Abiotic means without life, it is to hot for even bacteria to inhabit.

      Hottest recorded place on earth was the Lut Desert, Iran in 2005 which reached 159 degrees.

    • nicomp profile image

      nicomp really 4 years ago from Ohio, USA

      The bottom line is that Solar Energy collectors are not at all 'green.' It's a cool and expensive technology but it's not environmentally friendly.

    Click to Rate This Article