ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Didgeridoo - a sound like nothing I heard

Updated on January 13, 2014

Didgeridoo wooden instrument with a very special affect on me

The Didgeridoo has been played for thousands of years by the Australian aborigines.

The sound they can make, imitate the surrounding animals. You can, for example, hear the cocaburra bird clearly.

When the blowing starts, I shiver and stop thinking about anything else. This is on the borderline of magic for me.

A hand crafted de lux Didgeridoo - If you want one - buy a good quality one

The aboriginal didgeridoo (didjeridu, dijeridu, yidaki) is a long, wooden, or bamboo wind instrument used traditionally by the aboriginal people of Northern Australia. Rock paintings on caves have established that the didgeridoo has been used as a musical instrument for at least 20,000 years. These cut into varying lengths produce instruments with different pitches. The mouthpiece is made of beeswax.

The haunting tones of the didgeridoo are created by the vibrating of the player's lips. Since every Didgeridoo has its own unique shape, no two sound exactly alike. The didgeridoo is unique in the world of music in its use of a technique called circular breathing.

Hand Crafted, Fire Roasted Didgeridoo by RiverMan - Shroom
Hand Crafted, Fire Roasted Didgeridoo by RiverMan - Shroom

Fire Roasted Bamboo for strength and durability

Beautiful, natural, caramel color.

Authentic 100% beeswax mouthpiece

Hand burned and painted designs

 


An Australian...

15 in. x 18 in.

Buy This at Allposters.com

I wonder if you want to try but are afraid of the neighbors? What to do?

I am getting a Didgeridoo now

See results

Amazon MP3

MP3 - direct downloads with the Didgeridoo sound. Perfect for Ringtone or messages on your phone.

Interesting links about the Didgeridoo - can help you to better sleep

The Hornblast or Toot. First warn the neighbors! Very tightly press your lips together and blow hard (like playing a trumpet) into the didgeridoo. You should get a loud blast out the end. For an advanced technique try switching from droning to a quick hornblast and back to droning in your didgeridoo rhythms.

Xavier Rudd - the master Didgeridoo player

Guestbook

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 5 years ago from Central Florida

      Actually I have two of these but they are hanging on the wall for decorations. I never could get the hang of making proper sounds from them. I enjoy hearing recordings or live performances with a Didgeridoo.

    • DeniseDurham2011 profile image

      DeniseDurham2011 5 years ago

      One of my favorite instruments! My other favorite is a Djenbe. Jono Callow's video is great! Thanks :)

    • profile image

      RinchenChodron 5 years ago

      I love the dij - very healing sounds and vibrations. Nice choice for a lens.