Please take the time for this link.

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  1. profile image0
    Beth37posted 4 years ago
    1. Disappearinghead profile image75
      Disappearingheadposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      This was produced by a local high school not far frm me and South Wales Police.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0LCmStIw9E

      1. profile image0
        Beth37posted 4 years agoin reply to this

        Thanks for sharing that. They did a great job, it was definitely dramatic and horrific.
        The one I posted is all real life stories, it's very powerful. I hope you'll have a chance to watch it.

        1. Disappearinghead profile image75
          Disappearingheadposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          Yes I did watch the one you posted. I have to say that the lad who knocked down and killed the cyclist was incredibly brave to include his story.

          1. profile image0
            Beth37posted 4 years agoin reply to this

            I think his story touched me the most, though the man who was declared dead 3 times was heart wrenching too.

  2. wilderness profile image97
    wildernessposted 4 years ago

    Most phones, and an even higher percentage of phones used for heavy texting, have GPS capability.

    So easy to program it to neither display nor send when moving over 5 mph...yet we refuse. 

    Too many idiots, claiming they can text or talk while driving and it doesn't reduce their attention or driving ability.  So we pay a very heavy price, and often for someone else's stupidity.

    1. profile image0
      Beth37posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Did you get a chance to look at the link?

      1. wilderness profile image97
        wildernessposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        Both of them.  My only complaint is that texting is not the only problem will cell phones; there are probably more accidents caused by talking than texting, they just don't get the publicity.  They are not as easily provable, they aren't as common on a per mile basis and people want to talk even more than they want to text.  The idiots even think it doesn't harm their concentration on the road to talk; an obvious fallacy disproven many times.

        I repeat; the technology is already in the phone to shut it down when moving; it is a very sad comment that we don't use it.  We would rather give up the lives than pull off the road for a few seconds.  Rather kill than miss a LOL on the screen.  Rather maim someone for life than miss that call to pick up a gallon of milk on the way home. 

        There is always an excuse to use a phone today, and we use them all to save a few seconds or to get a giggle from a funny text - if it costs a life, so be it.

        1. profile image0
          Beth37posted 4 years agoin reply to this

          Yes, it is heartbreaking.

          Although I don't want to take any attention off the first link, this one is an ad I saw. It's not "real life" like the first one, but it is very powerful as well. Many UK'ers might have already seen it. It's quite graphic.

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKHY69AFstE

          1. Disappearinghead profile image75
            Disappearingheadposted 4 years agoin reply to this

            Ooh that's an old ad.

            1. profile image0
              Beth37posted 4 years agoin reply to this

              Kinda dark, but effective

        2. Disappearinghead profile image75
          Disappearingheadposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          To be honest I have never seen the functionality to disable texts whilst in motion on an iPhone or Windows 8 phone. I'll have to look into that.

          1. wilderness profile image97
            wildernessposted 4 years agoin reply to this

            I don't know that the current programming will allow that.  But if the phone knows where it is at all times, then it knows when it is moving (or CAN know that) and can obviously shut down the ability to receive or send based on the knowledge. 

            I just cannot see it as a problem, although it will of course shut down all phones in the car and not just the driver.  Another option (for the driver) would be to allow talk, but only through a bluetooth "hands free" setup - while still more dangerous than not talking this is much, much safer than holding a phone plastered to your head.

            1. profile image0
              Beth37posted 4 years agoin reply to this

              That's true, though only the new cars come with this capability.

              1. wilderness profile image97
                wildernessposted 4 years agoin reply to this

                You can buy bluetooth adapters for any car for around $20.  Or the little earpiece gizmos that do the same thing for office workers, etc.  They're not as nice, but they work and vastly reduce the danger of using a phone while driving.  Having a car with that capability, and using it, has absolutely convinced me that using that hands free device is far superior to holding that phone to my ear.

                We apparently don't use them because we, each and every one of us, are different than all the people tested for driving ability while talking.  We're all better than that group of losers, superior in nearly every way.  Especially in the ability to rationalize what we want to believe.

                1. profile image0
                  Beth37posted 4 years agoin reply to this

                  Well they've come up with enough options for us, now we just have to be fully convinced that there is no exception. What I liked about the mini-documentary was how they showed that the texts that cost lives were as short as 3 letters.

                  1. wilderness profile image97
                    wildernessposted 4 years agoin reply to this

                    Oh, we've had the options, we've had the knowledge, we've had the ability for quite a while.

                    We just don't have the will power or intelligence to give up a luxury we like in order to save lives.  Look how long it took to crack down on drunk driving - I don't see cell usage being one bit quicker, and probably much worse.  Almost everyone carries one, after all, but not everyone drinks while driving.  Meaning that we actually have to give our own luxury, not just other people, and that makes it 10 times as difficult to pass the law.

          2. profile image0
            Motown2Chitownposted 4 years agoin reply to this

            There isn't that functionality on an iPhone, but I turn on the DND feature while driving, and unless I need to charge my phone, I keep it in my purse.  Not hearing alerts via DND is helpful.  We tend to salivate like Pavlov's dog whenever our cell phones "ring."

            1. wilderness profile image97
              wildernessposted 4 years agoin reply to this

              DND?  What's DND?  Do Not Ding me?  (could you guess I don't have a smart phone?)

              1. profile image0
                Motown2Chitownposted 4 years agoin reply to this

                Do Not Disturb.  smile

                It silences the phone so there is no ring or vibrate when someone calls or texts.  Mine's automatic for the overnight hours, and I set it manually when I drive.

                My cell is my only phone, no landline.  So it's programmed to ring if my husband, daughter, or inlaws call-other than that, DND shuts it down.  smile

                1. wilderness profile image97
                  wildernessposted 4 years agoin reply to this

                  Well, that's what I said: Do Not Ding! smile

                  And for probably the first time ever, I'm going to poke at you.  Calls from your family are more important than the lives of the other people in your car or on the same road?  Or do you ALWAYS pull off the road before answering?

                  1. profile image0
                    Motown2Chitownposted 4 years agoin reply to this

                    Pull off before answering.  smile

                    Or wait until I get to my destination.  I have it programmed that way primarily for the overnight hours.  My husband and inlaws are in poor health.  In the event that there's a late night emergency, my phone will still ring.  Over the normal course of a day, we're likely just to text, so a phone call from one of them usually IS an emergency situation.  And only their calls will alert-not texts.

                    And you can poke.  smile

  3. David Carl profile image69
    David Carlposted 4 years ago

    Powerful. Shocking!

    1. profile image0
      Beth37posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      It was very powerful. Hard to shake.

  4. David Carl profile image69
    David Carlposted 4 years ago

    When I got this follow up message I thought you were going to ask me to watch another one! I am a person who couldn't watch Lassie as a boy because I cried when lassie got in trouble. I am now 6'3" and 220 lbs and still would ' t choose to watch Lassie. Same for Ole Yeller!

    1. profile image0
      Beth37posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Aw, Ol' Yeller. I had that record when I was a kid. It was the saddest thing ever.

 
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