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Top 10 Graphics Tablets | Graphics Tablet Brands and Reviews

Updated on August 23, 2017

Graphics Tablets 2014 | Options, Reviews, and More

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If you are looking for a graphics tablet, you will want to know which ones are the best for drawing. You want to be able to get a tablet that can improve the quality of your work for the lowest price possible. Well, you have found the right place—in this article, you will be able to find the tablet best suited to your personal needs, whether you are a professional designer or or a passionate hobbyist.

I personally know that finding a suitable drawing pad can seem intimidating. But while people often assume a drawing pad will be expensive, there are dozens and dozens of inexpensive devices that will work if you are looking for basic functionality. The only expensive drawing pads are specialized for professionals who need something top-of-the-line. This article will review tablets within a wide price range, from some very cheap pen tabs to some professional ones that may be a bit pricey. The majority of the tablets you will find on this page are affordable and well-suited to most needs.

Which tablet is the best for you largely depends on what you will be using it for. For example, a tablet for art will be different than one for document editing. This page will discuss and consider the different features available, so you can choose the one that best for your needs and budget.

If you are already familiar with the different features, scroll down to the top 10.

What Is a Graphics Tablet?

A graphics tablet can also be referred to as a graphics pad, drawing tablet, or digitizing tablet, so don't be confused. The device is the same. So, this handy little apparatus is an input that can be used instead of or in conjunction with a mouse or trackpad. Your typical tablet consists of a flat surface on which you can draw with the included pen, stylus, or puck. Some tablets come with a handy wireless mouse or a pen holder, but in reality all you need is a pen and the tablet itself. Sometimes, even people who are not artists choose to use a tablet because of its practicality!

People who prefer to work by hand, rather than by mouse or keyboard, are drawn to these devices. You can use them to edit anything from pictures to documents, in the office or at home.

Next, you will find explanations of some common features of graphic tablets.

Different Features

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Here is a breakdown of the different features available in graphics tablets. It's important to know the options available because, while all the tablets on the top 10 list are good, the best one for your needs will be the one with the most suitable combination of features.

In this section, we will cover tablet sizes, interfaces, pens/styli, accessories, and sensitivity.

If you are already familiar with the different features, skip directly to the top 10 list.

Graphics Tablet Size

One of the most important factors you will need to consider when choosing the right tablet for yourself is its size. For hobby users and your average artists, some common sizes are six by eight inches and four by five inches, but more developed artists and illustrators may require a larger work surface. While it is tempting to think the bigger, the better, be careful: The price rises with size.

You should only choose a bigger tablet for purely practical reasons. For example, it is crucial to make sure the work surface size is appropriate for the range of your hand motion.

If you work with minimal hand motion, a smaller tablet will be better for you. If you are used to drawing or painting in bigger, sweeping motions, then you need a larger work surface. It is as simple as that.

Up until recently, the dimensions of graphics tablets have corresponded with the 4:3 aspect ratio of traditional computer monitors. But as of lately, some companies (e.g. Wacom and Aiptek) have begun producing tablets that are better for working with widescreen monitors or even multiple monitors at the same time. Although it is neat to have your tablet dimensions correspond with the aspect ratio, it is not necessary. The tablet software works similarly to trackpad software, resolving this issue so that it does not interfere with your experience.

Graphics Tablet Interface

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The interface is how your tablet connects to the computer. Most tablets have a USB interface, which is excellent because it is supported by virtually all computers. However, if you own a computer that does not support USB, you will need to choose a tablet with a serial interface.

Bluetooth is another option for connecting to computers. Currently the only manufacturer that produces Bluetooth tablets is Wacom, with its Graphire Bluetooth that connects to your computer without wires. Wacom also makes handy wireless accessory kits to support its devices, enabling you to get rid of messy cables.

Pen/Stylus and Accessories

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When you choose a tablet, consider the dimensions and weight of the pen because you need it to feel comfortable in your hand. Check if the stylus needs a battery, because that will make it heavier. Some pens are not tethered—while this allows for greater freedom, it also means you will need to be extra careful not to misplace or lose them.

Certain pens also have an erasing end, which is a pretty cool feature. Some tablet manufacturers offer several pens, so you can program each with different settings (e.g. brush strokes, widths, etc). All in all, there are plenty of additional optional accessories, but the most important thing is that the pen and the work surface suit your needs.

Graphics Tablet Pressure Sensitivity

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Pressure sensitivity is a very important feature when choosing a suitable tablet for your needs. It refers to the sensitivity of the tablet to pressure on its surface. Currently, most tablets have 256, 512, 1024, or 2048 levels of pressure sensitivity—the higher the sensitivity, the less pressure it takes for the tablet to begin registering a mark made by the stylus. You can change the settings so that different aspects can be controlled by the amount of pressure that you use. For example, you can choose for the line thickness, transparency, color, and so on to vary with pressure.

The more sensitive your tablet, the better your experience, because it will feel more natural and authentic, and you will have more control over your strokes. However, don't feel as though you must automatically opt for the most expensive option you can afford. Most fare just fine with a tablet with medium specs.

The Top 10 Graphic Tablets According to Their Prices and Features

Now that we have a basic idea of what features we need, here are the 10 best-selling tablets available.

Top 10 Graphic Tablets Chart (Reviews Below)

Rank in List
Tablet
Active Area Size
Interface
Pen/Stylus and Accessories
Pressure Sensitivity
Price
1
Wacom Bamboo Create Pen and Touch Tablet
8.5 x 5.4 inches / 21.6 x 13.7 cm
USB; wireless kit available
Cordless, battery-free pen with eraser
1,024 levels
Around $143
2
Wacom CINTIQ
10.6 x 18.8 inches / 26.8 x 47.6 cm
USB; wireless kit available
Cordless, battery-free, tilt-sensitive pen with eraser
2,048 levels
Around $1,900
3
Wacom Bamboo Connect
5.8 x 3.6 inches / 14.7 x 9.1 cm
USB; wireless kit available
Cordless, battery-free pen, no eraser
1,024 levels
Around $200
4
8'' x 6'' DigiPro WP8060 USB Graphics Tablet
8 x 6 inches / 20.3 x 15.2 cm
USB
Cordless pen (requires one AAA battery) and wireless mouse
512 levels
Around $31
5
VT PenPad
6 x 4.5 inches / 15.2 cm x 11.4 cm
USB
Cordless pen (require one AAA battery), no eraser
1,024 levels
Around $40
6
Wacom Intuos5 Touch Small Pen Tablet
6.2 x 3.9 inches / 15.7 x 9.3 cm
USB; wireless kit available
Cordless, battery-free pen with eraser
2,048 levels
Around $140
7
Wacom Intuos4 Large Pen Tablet
12.8 x 8 inches / 32.5 x 20.3 cm
USB; wireless kit available
Cordless, battery-free pen with eraser
2,048 levels
Around $450
8
Wacom Bamboo Fun Tablet
8.5 x 5.4 inches / 21.6 x 13.7 cm
USB; wireless kit available
Cordless, battery-free pen with eraser
1,024 levels
About $70
9
VT Realm Pro Graphic Pen Tablet
8 x 5 inches / 20.3 x 12.7 cm
USB
Cordless, battery-free, tilt-sensitive pen
2,048 levels
Around $180
10
Monoprice Graphics Tablet
10 x 6.25 inches / 25.4 x 15.9 cm
USB
Cordless pen (requires on AAA battery), no eraser
2,048 levels
Around $60
Prices fluctuate; let the figures in this chart give you a rough estimate, but look up the products you are considering online to find current costs.

1. Wacom Bamboo Create Pen and Touch Tablet—Practical and Affordable!

Wacom Bamboo Create Pen and Touch Tablet (CTH670)
Wacom Bamboo Create Pen and Touch Tablet (CTH670)

As a proud owner of one of these, I have nothing bad to say about it. It is affordable and reliable and offers you everything you may need.

Since the relaunching of Bamboo tablets, we have not only gotten our hands on much sleeker-looking, revamped devices, they are now also much more impressive and responsive than their predecessors.

These tablets also come with a very healthy software pack (that includes Photoshop and Artrage), and they don a very MacBook-esque silver finish.

Main specifications:

- 1024 pressure sensitivity levels

- Dimensions of 13.8 x 8.2 x 0.4 inches

- 4 Express Keys

- Compatibility with Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP, and Mac OSX 10.5 and above

 

2. Wacom CINTIQ—For Serious and Professional Users

Wacom Cintiq 22HD 21-Inch Pen Display Tablet, Black (DTK2200)
Wacom Cintiq 22HD 21-Inch Pen Display Tablet, Black (DTK2200)

This is probably on the wish list of many artists who cannot yet afford it. It's definitely my dream tablet. The on-display drawing with maximum pressure sensitivity levels would enable each and every one of us to unleash the best art we contain within.

Cintiq is a HD interactive pen display that lets you do your drawing directly on its high definition LCD screen. With 2028 levels of pressure sensitivity, working on it feels entirely natural. I warmly recommend this to those of you who can afford this gem.

 

3. Wacom Bamboo Connect

Wacom Bamboo Connect Pen Tablet (CTL470)
Wacom Bamboo Connect Pen Tablet (CTL470)

Bamboo Connect and the dozens of software applications that come with it allow you to quickly sketch your ideas, add your personal flare to documents, edit papers, and write notes. The combination of the interface and the software package makes this tablet worth every penny.

This graphics tablet dons an easy, ergonomic design and comes with a battery-free pen stylus that is light and easy to use. I recommend this tablet to those who enjoy giving everything their personal touch.

 

4. 8" x 6" DigiPro WP8060 USB Graphics Tablet

8" x 6" DigiPro WP8060 USB Graphics Tablet w/Cordless Pen (Black)
8" x 6" DigiPro WP8060 USB Graphics Tablet w/Cordless Pen (Black)

This tablet comes with a pressure-sensitive stylus pen with 512 levels of pressure sensitivity and an eight by six inch working area, which makes it a perfect tablet for a beginner artist. It's compatible with most software programs, so you won't have to worry about that.

In fact, this pen tablet offers a lot more than one would expect from a tablet in this price range, and I warmly recommend it to developing artists.

 

5. VT PenPad 7.7-Inch Graphic Pen Tablet

VT PenPad 7.7-Inch Graphic Pen Tablet (Black)
VT PenPad 7.7-Inch Graphic Pen Tablet (Black)

The VT PenPad is a perfect tablet for beginners who want practice. It is not a big investment; in fact it is very affordable for the features it offers. It can be used as a great learning tool for children, students, artists, or anyone who uses a computer. With overall dimensions of 7.5 inches by 7.5 inches and an active area of 6 inches by 4.5 inches, the VT PenPad is an ideal learning, drawing, and writing tool that is great for everyday use. I would definitely recommend it as a starter tablet.

 

6. Wacom Intuos5 Touch Small Pen Tablet

Wacom Intuos5 Touch Small Pen Tablet (PTH450)
Wacom Intuos5 Touch Small Pen Tablet (PTH450)

This ergonomically designed tablet offers the maximum pressure sensitivity levels out there, and for a reasonable price. Although it has a smaller surface, most will be comfortable with working on it, because its size does not in any way impede the tablet's multi-functionality. You can easily pan, rotate, and navigate your artwork, and the tablet comes with ExpressKey settings and a lot of fantastic software.

I currently use this tablet, and so far I am extremely satisfied with it, especially since the smaller surface really works much better for me. I would recommend it to anyone—it is a top-notch graphics tablet!

 

7. Wacom Intuos4 Large Pen Tablet

Wacom Intuos4 Large Pen Tablet
Wacom Intuos4 Large Pen Tablet

The Intuos4 Large Pen Tablet offers you a large space to work on and is perfect for users who use larger strokes and therefore need more space to draw and edit naturally. It is particularly good because of its simple design, Express Keys, light weight battery-free pen, and high pressure sensitivity levels.

If you require generous space while working, this reasonably-priced tablet is exactly what you need.

 

8. Wacom Bamboo Fun Tablet

Wacom Bamboo Fun Tablet
Wacom Bamboo Fun Tablet

This stylish silver tablet offers a large working space and a beautiful, sleek design. It also has multi-touch functionality, enabling you to edit, pan, rotate, and move with a single touch or gesture. The Wacom Bamboo Fun Tablet is not called fun without reason.

The great thing is that it is also well-suited and enjoyable for professionals. It is highly pressure sensitive and very simple to use. This tablet is a bargain.

 

9. VT Muse 12-Inch Artist's Professional Graphic Pen Tablet

VT Muse 12-Inch Artist's Professional Graphic Pen Tablet (Black)
VT Muse 12-Inch Artist's Professional Graphic Pen Tablet (Black)

VT Muse is a large surface precision tablet that is more than well-suited for professional artists, photographers, and designers. Its pressure sensitivity levels and great compatibility make it a good option for an artist of any level.

It is very easy to use, with a simple, ergonomic design and a battery-free light pen; this tablet offers a lot for the price. It also has Express Keys, multi-touch functionality, and everything you will need for enjoyable drawing or editing experiences.

 

10. Monoprice Graphics Tablet

Monoprice 10X6.25 Inches Graphic Drawing Tablet
Monoprice 10X6.25 Inches Graphic Drawing Tablet

This tablet features the stunning pressure sensitivity of 1024 levels for an extremely cheap price. This is a real value product—it is reasonably big, very easy to use, well-designed, and fantastically reviewed.

If you are a new artist or just testing the waters with tablets, look no further. You will not regret a single cent spent on this very solid and very cheap tablet.

 

I want to know!

Do you own a graphics tablet?

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If so, which one do you own?

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Leave a comment! - Which tablet do you use? Which one would you like to have?

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    • AnonymousC831 profile image

      AnonymousC831 3 years ago from Kentucky

      Nice lens, very informative.

    • ebasketballshoes profile image

      ebasketballshoes 3 years ago

      Oh no, it's great too! function of the product is great.

    • teelover profile image

      teelover 3 years ago

      Great selection!

    • astinax profile image

      astinax 3 years ago

      I have the wacom bamboo pen and touch tablet. It's a really good tablet, I like it a lot. I mainly use it for graphic editing and for drawing. Great lens and I totally agree with the top ten !

    • Jimmy Oliver profile image

      Jimmy J Oliver 4 years ago

      Hi nice lens you got there and ranking well. I have heard of graphic tablets, your lens has explained how and when to use them

      Have given you a squidlike.

    • boneworld profile image

      Jackson Thom 4 years ago from West of Left South Lucky

      Great article. Really informative. I have a tablet. A VT Penpad, and I don't really like it that much. The pen's a little heavy, because there's a battery in it, and the pad isn't sensitive, so I have trouble drawing well with it. I have an Amazon gift card waiting for something to buy, so I'll probably get a Wacom tablet pretty soon. However, the VT Penpad was cheap, and it did get me introduced to what they were all about. Anyway, great lens. Thanks.

    • steadytracker lm profile image

      steadytracker lm 4 years ago

      Wow, some really great options. Thanks for sharing.

    • profile image

      fcinternetmarketing 4 years ago

      Great info.

    • EliasZanetti LM profile image

      EliasZanetti LM 4 years ago

      Thanks for the great info.. I'm always on the look out for some new gadgets like this

    • YearningAndHarm profile image

      YearningAndHarm 4 years ago

      It is still difficult to say for certain if a graphics tablet is working for me. I am partially handicapped, having lost find motor control in my right hand. I have since adapted to doing everything left hand only (such as typing (45 wpm)). But my left hand has never learned to draw the way I once was able to with my right hand; no more pen and ink since the disability.

      I have since been overjoyed at discovering Inkscape. I've developed a method where I could simulate ink strokes by drawing their shapes and then duplicating and placing the shapes to create various cross-hatch and etching effects. It's a tedious process ... but the results are VERY nice to me .. I thought I'd never be able to draw again ... but now I have the ability restored to me with Inkscape. Yes, I do use Adobe Photo and Ilst ... but the point-and-click method was first developed with Inkscape.

      The problem I have with digital tablets is that it takes a lot of coordination to get used to using it. Pointing with a pen instead of a mouse takes getting used to, as does alternating between drawing and selecting key commands. For most people, this isn't such an issue, as they have both hands to work with. I have one.

      A little later, if I can afford it, I may try the Wacom Centriq, or other tabs that have the computer screen display within the tablet. This may be a very revolutionary concept.

      I'd be delighted to hear from others who may have had disabilities. What was your artwork like before your disability? How has digital creativity developed for you? Were you able to successfully overcome your disability through digital means? That would make for a very interesting story!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      A lot of bloggers seem to like the bamboo.

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @anonymous: Bamboo is the best way to go if you are not sure what you really need. It's a very well balanced tablet that has all you may need. :)

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @nifwlseirff: Cintiq is fantastic, its price isn't bloated out of proportion at all. Personally, I think it's worth every penny. Wacom generally does not disappoint, although I was positively surprised with some other brands of graphics tabs as well. Cintiq is my dream also, but I cannot afford it just yet.

    • profile image

      nifwlseirff 4 years ago

      I'd love a large integrated screen/tablet, but have been rather cautious. Using a stylus on the iPhone/iPad seems to have quite a bit of lag, and I'd like to work on photos (instead of with the mouse). I know Wacom make superb graphics tabs, but haven't had a chance to try the Cintiq yet.

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @jonathan-reiter2: Good luck with finding a perfect larger tablet, then. Although, Inutuos 3 is a really good one too. Thank you for your feedback!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @Thamisgith: Definitely! It's a really good investment if he enjoys it too much - there is nothing more important than creativity!

    • profile image

      Thamisgith 4 years ago

      My son has a Wacom Bamboo. He absolutely loves it and has produced some great sketches and cartoons. It didn't even cost all that much - but money well spent I think!

    • profile image

      jonathan-reiter2 4 years ago

      I already have a tablet and pen... It's a Wacom Intuos 3... It's 6x8 inches in surface area, and does the job admirably... I want to get another one, likely bigger, and capable of working in Autocad or whatever...

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @anonymous: You may have a bit of a problem with the cheaper ones, but for instance, Wacom has its own software that upgrades the drivers and so on in accordance to your system. Look into the description of the tablet you like a bit better, there has to be a system compatibility label somewhere :) And, of course, good luck with your craft and enjoy it as much as you possibly can. It is a gift!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I am having trouble finding a windows 8 compatible graphic tablet. I am looking for something that also is easy to draw with and could draw fine detail. I design wedding gowns and other things in a sketch book (paper and graphite pencil...the flinstones way) and I am looking to modernize my craft:)

    • MBurgess profile image

      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      I would have to go with an inexpensive one for now. I have been thinking about getting a tablet for awhile. Reading your lens has been very helpful! Thanks for posting this ~ Great lens!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @TolovajWordsmith: Thank you, I tried my best to make a good selection.

    • TolovajWordsmith profile image

      Tolovaj Publishing House 4 years ago from Ljubljana

      Impressive selection of graphic tablets. Great reference!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @RhondaAlbom: Thank you for your feedback and your blessing - they are greatly appreciated! :)

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @Deadicated LM: Bamboo is an excellent tablet, and it isn't all that expensive. It all depends what you are looking for, and of course, your software.

    • RhondaAlbom profile image

      Rhonda Albom 4 years ago from New Zealand

      Great info on graphics tablets. Wish I read it before I purchased - although I probably would have made the same choice, just with more information. Blessed.

    • SpannerMontanna profile image

      Neil Spencer 4 years ago from uk

      What a great lens this is and a very interesting read ;-)

    • Deadicated LM profile image

      Deadicated LM 4 years ago

      I have the Wacom Bamboo; it's good for the Laptop and old version of Photoshop (CS) I'm using.

    • TimothyArends profile image

      Timothy Arends 4 years ago from Chicago area

      I have a Wacom Intuos 2 Tablet, and although I purchased a medium-sized model, I still think it's a little big and awkward. Frankly, I don't like the design of any of the tablets out there, including the Wacoms. The problem is that there is no possible way to have both the tablet and the keyboard within convenient reach at the same time. So drawing on the tablet has, for me, always been a clumsy experience.

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @CoolFool83: These are definitely useful gadgets to own! Thank you!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @choosehappy: Oh my, thank you very much! I appreciate that and it motivates me to build even better lenses!

    • choosehappy profile image

      Vikki 4 years ago from US

      Popping back in with a blessing ;)

    • CoolFool83 profile image

      CoolFool83 4 years ago

      I could use one, awesome lense!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @bikerministry: Thank you, I hope you find what you are looking for!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @tonybonura: Thank you, I appreciate your opinion!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @anonymous: Thank you!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @TemporaryTattoo1: Life has its priorities, and I am sure you don't regret a thing. :)

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @anonymous: A lot of things need to be considered, not only the pressure sensitivity. :)

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 4 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @jamjar919 lm: I'm sure you will get one eventually. :)

    • bikerministry profile image

      bikerministry 4 years ago

      Now I'm in the market for one!! Great lens.

    • tonybonura profile image

      Tony Bonura 4 years ago from Tickfaw, Louisiana

      A very interesting and informative lens. Great job!

      TonyB

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Nice products and information

    • TemporaryTattoo1 profile image

      TemporaryTattoo1 4 years ago

      I would love to own the ipad but all my hard earned cash gets spent on my baby son and preparing for the new arrival. Money well spent so i can live without it.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Ah, it was the pressure sensitivity that I was concerned about and thought it would make a difference from one tablet to another.

    • jamjar919 lm profile image

      jamjar919 lm 5 years ago

      I would really like a google nexus 7, my friend has one and I'm jealous...

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @Sara Krentz: There sure are some very cheap ones out there. The price range is really good - almost everyone can afford a tablet, maybe not the exact one they want immediately, but sometimes it's better to wait.

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @squidoopets: That's a really cool idea as a gift for yourself. Especially if it would help you!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @squidoopets: That's a really cool idea as a gift for yourself. Especially if it would help you!

    • Sara Krentz profile image

      Sara Krentz 5 years ago from USA

      Very helpful lens - we've been considering getting a tablet for a few months now. I had no idea there were such inexpensive ones out there.

    • squidoopets profile image

      Darcie French 5 years ago from Abbotsford, BC

      A graphics tablet would surely make my work life easier - I may treat myself as a Christmas gift

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @anonymous: I am really glad you do! I appreciate your visit!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @anonymous: Glad you think so!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @Kumar P S: You're welcome!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @Kumar P S: You're welcome!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @anonymous: That's an excellent plan! Splash is a very good tablet, and very affordable. And you are never too old to do anything you want! :)

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @BestRatedStuff: I'm glad that this was helpful, thanks! I appreciate your feedback.

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @Noveliaa: Thank you, I appreciate it!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
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      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @DJRebelstar1: I'm glad you like it, thanks for visiting!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Al of them... I love the all :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      these are great. really great

    • Kumar P S profile image

      Kumar P S 5 years ago

      Great lens ! Thanks for sharing.

    • Kumar P S profile image

      Kumar P S 5 years ago

      Great lens ! Thanks for sharing.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      It didn't say "Splash" on the back, but I see from one of you listings, I have the Bamboo Splash. If I can ever master it, I'll outgrow it. But for around $60, it was an economical way to get started with a tablet. And not too expensive, if it turns out I'm too old to learn new tricks. :)

    • BestRatedStuff profile image

      BestRatedStuff 5 years ago

      Excellent, just thinking about buying one, you brought up things I need to look for and a wide price range of good tablets. Thanks for doing the research, I will be making use of the info.

    • profile image

      Noveliaa 5 years ago

      Excellent lens! Squidlike

    • DJRebelstar1 profile image

      DJRebelstar1 5 years ago

      A great lens on something I know very little about, but now I do!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @FashionMommy: I am glad you think so!

    • mechanicaleye profile image
      Author

      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @athomemomblog: You're right - Wacom is the standard. I also find the Bamboo the most affordable out of the bunch when we consider the specifics.

    • profile image

      FashionMommy 5 years ago

      very wide selections of digitabs!! thanks for sharing. very informative lens

    • profile image

      FashionMommy 5 years ago

      very wide selections of digitabs!! thanks for sharing. very informative lens

    • athomemomblog profile image

      Genesis Davies 5 years ago from Guatemala

      I think the Bamboo one looks best for my needs and budget, though Wacom seems to be the industry standard.

    • mechanicaleye profile image
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      Eda Škulj 5 years ago from Bosnia and Herzegvina

      @LiteraryMind: Glad you liked it!

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      Ellen Gregory 5 years ago from Connecticut, USA

      Thanks for all the information.