ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Kokkarebellur : a great example of Symbiosis between Man and Bird

Updated on April 7, 2017
Kokkarebellur village
Kokkarebellur village
Spot-billed Pelicans on a tree in Kokkerabellur
Spot-billed Pelicans on a tree in Kokkerabellur
Painted Storks on a tree in Kokkerabellur
Painted Storks on a tree in Kokkerabellur
Painted Storks on a tree in Kokkarebellur
Painted Storks on a tree in Kokkarebellur

Kokkarebellur : an introduction

In these days where birds are seen often as a nice protein-rich dish for a meal, there are some examples where this is not true, where the birds are seen as part of the Nature in which we the human beings belong to, and there is a beautiful symbiotic relation between the two. One such commendable example is the case of Kokkarebellur, a remote village in the state of Karnataka, India. Here, villagers are living a life of complete harmony and co-operation between themselves and the migratory Pelicans and Painted Storks which migrate in this village every year for nesting and hatching the young.

Kokkrebellur : what the name signifies

The local name of the Painted Stork (Ibis leaucocephalus) is ‘Kokkare” in the Kannada language and ‘Bellur” means ‘white village’. Combining the two words, Kokkarebellur means ‘the White village of storks’ or the village made white by storks. The white here may point towards the white coloured droppings of the thousands of birds which have made the trees in the village their homes.

A village woman collecting the white droppings of the birds
A village woman collecting the white droppings of the birds

Migratory birds of Kokkerabellur

Two types of migratory birds have made this village their temporary home :

1) The Painted Storks (Ibis leaucocephalus) , and

2) The Spotbilled Pelicans (Pelicanus phillipensis).

Both are classified as “Near Threatened category” in IUCN Red List of 2009.

Kokkarebellur is one of the 21 breeding sites of these birds recognized in India.

The birds start coming when the monsoon ends in September. They make nests in the trees --mainly the Ficus trees (Ficus religiosa and Ficus bengalensis) and the Tamarind trees (Tamarindus indica) and start laying eggs from October. The young ones hatch from eggs from January. The parents feed their offspring and when they are old enough to fly, they leave the village, only to come back again in next September. It is said that the same birds come and make nests in the same tree year after year.

A Tamarind tree at Kokkerabellur with some Painted Storks sitting on the tree
A Tamarind tree at Kokkerabellur with some Painted Storks sitting on the tree
A Painted Stork
A Painted Stork
Another Painted Stork on a Tamarind tree
Another Painted Stork on a Tamarind tree
A Spot-billed Pelican
A Spot-billed Pelican
Another Spot-billed Pelican
Another Spot-billed Pelican
A pair of Spot-billed Pelicans
A pair of Spot-billed Pelicans
A Painted Stork
A Painted Stork

Non-migratory birds of Kokkerabellur

Apart from these two migratory birds, Kokkarebellur is also the home of a number of non-migratory birds like Black-crowned night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), Grey Pond Heron (Ardea cineresa), Indian Pond Heron (Ardeola grayii), Little Cormorant (Phalacrocorax niger) and Black Ibis (Pseudibis papillosa).

Black- crowned Night Heron
Black- crowned Night Heron
Indian Pond Heron
Indian Pond Heron

The symbiotic relationship between the birds and the villagers

The villagers are very attached emotionally to the birds and they help and protect the birds from natural and human dangers. On the other hand, the birds provide the villagers Potassium- rich manure in the form of their droppings (guano) which is very useful to the villagers. So, here we see a nice symbiotic relationship between the two.

How to go

Kokkarebellur is situated near the state highway connecting Bangaluru and Mysuru. It is about 82 km from Bangaluru (Bangalore), the state capital and is well-connected to that city or Mysuru as well. On the Bangaluru – Mysuru highway, near the town of Channapatna, there is a smaller road forking to the left (if one comes from Bangaluru). This road leads to the village of Kokkarebellur which is about 13 km from that road intersection.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)