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Snorkeling along Ningaloo Reef - How to Snorkel

Updated on May 16, 2014

Snorkeling Ningaloo Reef Coast - A Must

Have you ever tried snorkeling or are you thinking of giving it a try ? I hope you do as when you are swimming along in the sea head down snorkeling watching the coloured fish darting out from under rocks or a sting ray gliding by gracefully it is like another world as if you have magically found a new place , somewhere exotic & full of wonder!

The benefit of Ningaloo Reef is that you can snorkel straight off the beach without even needing to go in a boat !

I love it swimming with big blue groper watching the little fish swimming by without a care , the different scenes going on down there that change as you look in every direction !

Last week we did the long drive up north to Ningaloo reef National Park in Western Australia to check out new areas where there are turtles, sharks we can swim with, feed dolphins and much more!!

I was fortunate enough to feed a dolphin at Monkey Mia early one morning along with others ! We had a Swim with a turtle at Lakeside behind the information center not far from the shore there at Ningaloo Reef & highly recommend Ningaloo Reef for a visit to check out the various beaches for different scenery.

In my other hubs you can read more about our visit to Monkey Mia, Kalbarri, Carnarvon and more!


Snorkeling

We saw a shark at Turquiose Bay !
We saw a shark at Turquiose Bay !

Me snorkeling !

Oyster Stacks

oyster stacks snorkel
oyster stacks snorkel

Oyster Stacks Snorkeling

Today we went out to Oyster Stacks for a snorkel.This is where you start a bit further down the bay & the tide brings you back as you enjoy the scenery below you.

This is the next bay down from Turquiose Bay .

It was very rocky getting in and we appreciated our booties,yet it was well worth it as the variety of coloured fish is awesome !

Make sure you only go at high tide to avoid coral damage !

There wasn't a lot of car parking available so if there in summer I would get to the beach early to make sure you get a parking spot.

Lakeside

 It is a nice spot at lakeside for people of all ages to go snorkeling especially children .

You can either go snorkeling at the first beach ,however if you follow the signs and walk a bit further this is where I swam with a turtle so it was well worth the extra walk in the heat !

Take plenty of water to drink especially in the summer months .

Turquiose Bay

 Turquiose Bay is a beautiful spot for snorkeling & we went there a couple of times .

First of there is the drift snorkle wher like Oyster Bay the tide brings you back into shore while you are watching the scenery below you .

Be very careful on a windy day, we found it best early morning as it was too strong for us on our first attempt .

I wouldn't reccommend it for young children.

However the other part of Turquiose bay is lovely for children and there is still plenty to see and enjoy.

I Swam with a turtle at Lakeside !

Patience was rewarded !!!
Patience was rewarded !!!

How much does it cost to snorkel at Ningaloo Reef ?

 If you are camping in the Ningaloo Reef National park for a while you will pay a one day fee for your car $11 then $7 per night per adult.

To snorkel is free if you have your own gear which is the cheapest way.

You can buy snorkeling gear in Exmouth or the information centre in the park itself.

Is it safe for kids to snorkel ningaloo reef ?

 Yes ! Children can enjoy snorkeling at Ningaloo Reef  with their parents !

I would reccommend Turquiose Bay when there is no wind , not the loop but the bay, they can see a lot of brightly coloured fish there and not to far out.

Lakeside is nice as well , walk in off the sand !

Oyster stacks is a bit more awkward and rocky .

Exmouth Visitors Centre

As you are passing thru Exmouth take the time to visit the friendly staff at the Exmouth visitor centre ,

This is where you book your turtle tour  or any other tours you might like to go on, stock up om local information, purchase your souvenirs etc

How to Snorkel

Tips on How to Snorkel

Snorkeling is a tool used to access one of nature's most marvelous realms, and the ocean remains one of the best arenas for exercising our sense of discovery, as well as our bodies. The key to successful snorkeling is relaxation in the water

. Practice will improve your skills and comfort in the water. The tips below assume you already have well fitting equipment.

Your Mask

Be sure the mask fits your face. Hold the snorkel mask up to your face clearing the strap from your face. Breath in through your nose. The mask should seal perfectly and stay on, without holding it, for as long as you breath in. If any air leaks in, water will also. Keep all hair out of the seal.

Fins

Choose fins that are snug but not too tight. If they hurt or curl your toes especially, you may develop cramps while snorkeling. If they slip off your heels, they're too big. Better a little big than too small. Remember they will slip on easier when your feet are wet.

Defog your mask!

No point going through all the trouble if you can't see anything (by the way snorkel rental places carry masks with prescription lenses). Products made for defogging seem to work OK ,anything from spit (or dog drool, which we've heard is THEE best), (must use salt water to work well).

Practice Breathing

Practice calm floating in the face down and horizontal position. Having something (scenery, coral, fish, dolphins!, or even your finger tips waving) to focus on helps by distracting you from overanalyzing (worse as we get older).

It takes a little while to get the rhythm going.

Knowing your personal limitations is a vital skill often overlooked.We normally snorkel for about 20 minutes then take a break.

Recognize them and remain alert to them. There is no good reason to push your limits. They will change with each snorkeling opportunity presented. Factors to consider are water temperature, surge, currents, and visibility.

"Under the Sea"-- that's where you should be, when you travel to places with coral and beautiful fish-life. Everyone should snorkel, and with a little effort, kids as young as five or six can have a fun experience.

Snorkelers in your group should carefully stay away from coral. Coral is damaged when it's touched; also any contact with the coral will instantly cause a scrape or cut.

When with children.

  1. You don't need to buy expensive snorkel sets; in fact, it may be better to buy inexpensive gear get a few extra masks, to increase your chances of getting a good fit on little faces. (Don't buy the really, really cheap little-kid sets though.)
  2. Make sure you're comfortable with your own snorkeling equipment. You'll have to give full attention to your child, as she/he explores this exciting new world.
  3. Remind your child not to kick other snorkelers in the face: kids get so absorbed in what they're seeing, they tend not to notice other snorkelers!


Lucky Bay

Heard this is a place to snorkle
Heard this is a place to snorkle

Monkey Mia

As well as watching the dolphins being fed you can  enjoy a unique snorkelling adventure in the Shark Bay World Heritage Marine Park in Western Australia. Snorkel in pristine clear water and dive off a remote beach on Dirk Hartog Island, or another location selected by your skipper !

Make new friends under water !

Have you been to Ningaloo Reef ? Where is your favourite snorkeling Spot ?

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    • freecampingaussie profile imageAUTHOR

      freecampingaussie 

      3 years ago from Southern Spain

      Snakesmum , Thanks for the visit , Ningaloo Reef is special but I bet it was awesome in Fiji as well ! I have never been there .

    • profile image

      Snakesmum 

      3 years ago

      On a visit to WA, we didn't get as far up as Ningaloo Reef - seems we missed out on something. I really enjoy snorkelling. Earlier this year we were in Fiji, which was great. Haven't been lucky enough to see a turtle yet, but did spot a sea snake.

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