ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

The Bailey Island Bridge

Updated on July 13, 2010

The Bailey Island Bridge

To a child, crossing the Bailey Island Bridge was a thrill--it was so long and narrow and, in the middle, high above the water.
To a child, crossing the Bailey Island Bridge was a thrill--it was so long and narrow and, in the middle, high above the water.
Here you can see the unique construction of the bridge, entirely of cut stone placed in layers, with gaps for the water to go through.
Here you can see the unique construction of the bridge, entirely of cut stone placed in layers, with gaps for the water to go through.
The view from my cousin's boat.  Room for a good sized boat to pass under.
The view from my cousin's boat. Room for a good sized boat to pass under.
The view from Cooks Point including the bridge and open ocean beyond.
The view from Cooks Point including the bridge and open ocean beyond.

A Unique Bridge Design


On reading Amanda Severn's hub showing bridges in art and photos, I decided to post a hub on this bridge from my childhood.

After an afternoon of haying on our farm, which was about a half hour inland from the islands, we loved to get in the car and go for a swim off the Orr's Island ledges. Sometimes we would go over the Bailey Island Bridge and all the way to Land's End where we looked for pretty stones along a little rocky beach. The trip to Land's End was exciting.

I remember hearing that the Bailey Island Bridge was designed in the architectural style of bridges in Scotland--and that there was none other like it in the US. Don't know whether that's true, but it's always nice to feel that your area is special.

A Wikipedia entry explains: Design of the 1,150-foot bridge was complicated by the tides in the area known as Will’s Gut. It was decided to build a cribstone bridge using granite slabs from local quarries. Granite slabs were considered sufficiently heavy to withstand wind and wave, while the open cribbing allowed the tide to ebb and flow freely without increasing tidal current to any great degree. Some 10,000 tons of granite were used in the project.

The entry further says that a sidewalk was added in 1951—which would have been after my first trips across the bridge. The 1961 guard rails were added after I grew up.

The bridge is a Historic Civil Engineering Landmark, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Bailey Island Bridge is reported to be the only granite cribstone bridge in the world. I wonder if I made up that story about similar Scottish bridges.



Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • triciajean profile imageAUTHOR

      Patricia Lapidus 

      8 years ago from Bantam, CT

      Thanks for you responses, amillar and Amanda. It was fun to do a hub with pictures--and way fun to live that life on the farm and the islands.

    • Amanda Severn profile image

      Amanda Severn 

      8 years ago from UK

      I've not seen anything like this here in the South of England, though it seems a practical solution to the problem of a fierce tide. Lovely photos Triciajean, and an interesting history. Thanks for posting!

    • amillar profile image

      amillar 

      8 years ago from Scotland, UK

      Well triciajean I haven't seen anything like it in my part of Scotland, but I'm just a stones throw from the English/Scottish Border, and there was a time when it wasn't only stones they threw. Nice hub though.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)