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Why is it Boston?

Updated on February 12, 2018

So Why Is It “Boston”?

It seems easy to find the answer to this question; however, if you look deeper, you will not find a convincing explanation, and my version seems to be the most truthful.

Thus, Boston, Massachusetts, was founded in the 17th century by people from the English port of the same name in Lincolnshire County.

It’s necessary to name the state, as in this “country of reflections”, everything reflects itself not once, like circles on water.

Before getting this name, the city was called “Three Mountains”, and you’ll certainly sense it in the center, walking around the District of Millionaires. Originally, they were the banks of the river, but later, the water was filled up with sand, and Boston garden-parks were created across the street from each other.

It’s a well-known fact that many English words were borrowed from the Eastern languages. Just as the word “Boston” is closely related to the Persian word “Bustan’’ – Boston, which means “garden”. That seems to fit the description of our city with garden-parks in the center.

In the 13th century Persian poet Saadi wrote a book of poems “Garden”, and at that exact time an English port got its name “Boston”.

Due to the fast developing trading, a small settlement got the status of a city and its name.

It has been proven by historians that immigrants from Europe, Persia, and India, except the Hungarians and the Finns, have the same ancestors.

My friend’s daughter, visiting the Central Asia, took a picture under the signboard not far from Dushanbe, leading to Tajik Boston.

Nowadays, when people hear the word “Iran”, they think about a Muslim country; however, Persia had always been the country of Zoroastrism, and Islam became a local religion only in the early Middle Ages.

It’s obvious to me that Persian merchants, after having arrived to the Port of England, called it “Garden”, after that, America inherited this name.

Today, English Boston is famous for its big church and all the attempts to explain its name don’t sound convincing.

Moreover, I happened to listen to the lecture of a Harvard professor once about the Sogdians, people who lived in the Central Asia in the early Middle Ages, and he asked the audience to name big rivers in Europe such as the Danube, Dnepr. Surprisingly, in Sogdian it means “water”.

In addition, Sogdians were fair-skinned, red-haired, and green-eyed, who look a lot like the Irish, but it’s a different topic for discussion.

The lecturer also mentioned that the Sgdians were known as good warriors and merchants; for this reason, they were invited to serve in King Arthur’s Court.

In the Bible, the Songs of David are borrowed Persian poems of the ancient period, just as the plot of ‘’Romeo and Juliet” by Shakespeare is “Layla and Manjun”, for instance.

The plots of many well-known fairy-tales and other works let us trace borrowings and adaptation. Just as a Russian Doll that got into Russia from Japan, or Ikebana that arrived to Japan from India through China.

translated by

Tom Charlton

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