jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (15 posts)

Best Bounce Analytic Rate

  1. oderog profile image38
    oderogposted 5 years ago

    Hey Hubbers what would say is the best Google Analytic bouncing rate, to help you achieve more success

    1. 2besure profile image83
      2besureposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I heard anything 50 or below is good.   you can still make money with a higher bounce rate.

  2. WryLilt profile image89
    WryLiltposted 5 years ago

    Mine is about 90% I believe. Remember that it's considered a bounce when they click an advert.

    1. oderog profile image38
      oderogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I believe that the lower the percentage the better, on Bounce rate

      1. psycheskinner profile image80
        psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        That assume you want people to read multiple pages. General I want them to read only my page then click an ad.

  3. timorous profile image91
    timorousposted 5 years ago

    Here's what Google says about bounce rate, and other visitor data:
    Visitor Reports Overview

    The data you get requires a bit of interpretation, and is affected by many factors, so you have to balance the bounce rate with other factors.

    1. Rosie2010 profile image84
      Rosie2010posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      thanks for the link, timorous!  I don't understand a lot of it as I am a little dense, but it's nice to have a link to go to when I need it.  Thanks again. smile

      1. timorous profile image91
        timorousposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        You're most welcome Rosie. smile  I must confess, I also have a bit of trouble interpreting the info.  At first glance, a high bounce rate might seem an undesirable thing, if your page is strictly info and no ads.  However, if you have ads on your page, it could well be a good thing.

  4. Rosie2010 profile image84
    Rosie2010posted 5 years ago

    The last time I looked my bounce rate is 75.65%.  This is a much improved bounce rate for me, as it used to be in the high 80s.

  5. melpor profile image89
    melporposted 5 years ago

    The lower the bounce rate the better. Another way of looking at is if you have a bounce rate of 100% that means the reader went to your hub and left it right of way. They did not read the hub. If your bounce rate is closer to O% that means the reader stayed on your hub to read it. Also you must correlate your bounce rate with the time your readers are spending on your hub. The higher the time the lower your bounce rate.

    1. lrohner profile image85
      lrohnerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Melpor - That's not quite correct. Google defines a bounce as someone who comes to a site, reads one page and leaves. It doesn't make any difference whether they're on the page for 5 seconds or 5 minutes.

      My bounce rate is usually 90% or higher here on HubPages, and I'm very happy with that. My hubs are written on a variety of topics, so if a reader lands on my page to read about Topic A, I would hardly think they would be interested in Topic B. On my own personal websites where the entire site revolves around one niche, however, I would be concerned with a bounce rate that was higher than 25%.

  6. melpor profile image89
    melporposted 5 years ago

    Irohner,  the lower the bounce rate the better. My bounce rate is around 82% and have been steadily dropping since I been on Hubpages. That is a good thing base on the following definition from Google:

    "Bounce rate is the percentage of single-page visits or visits in which the person left your site from the entrance (landing) page. Use this metric to measure visit quality - a high bounce rate generally indicates that site entrance pages aren't relevant to your visitors. The more compelling your landing pages, the more visitors will stay on your site and convert. You can minimize bounce rates by tailoring landing pages to each keyword and ad that you run. Landing pages should provide the information and services that were promised in the ad copy."

    1. lrohner profile image85
      lrohnerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I stand by what I said. A low bounce rate for a stand-alone website is desirable. It's not as applicable to a site like HubPages. I'm not saying it's a bad thing -- just not really applicable.

      If someone enters the site via my hub on Nutella, for instance, why would they then want to go and read my hub on low blood sugar, Maine or figure skating? That simply doesn't make sense.

      What Google is talking about in that quote is drawing people into deeper pages of the website with the ultimate goal of them converting, ie clicking an ad, buying a product, etc. For most of my hubs, there IS no other relevant content of mine or "deeper pages" to draw them into. I fully expect them to come, read and then leave -- hopefully by clicking on an ad. smile

    2. White Teeth profile image60
      White Teethposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Melpor, Irohner explained it very well. Go back and read her response again.

  7. thisisoli profile image66
    thisisoliposted 5 years ago

    It depends in what field you are looking at bounce rate.  If you are looking at clicks through to an external site a higher bounce rate tracked by analytics is not particularly bad.

    In terms of SEO the bounce rate as tracked by IP's returning to the SE in seconds, or tracking of people with the option enabled in Google toolbar, then you want that bounce rate to be as low as possible.

 
working