Two tasty vegetarian Italian Dishes, leaf shaped pasta easy recipe

Beautiful Pasta

Welcome to the kitchen


Hi there, come in and join Fabio and myself for another cooking evening. We regularly get together and do some cooking and lots of chatting; Fabio originates from the beautiful region of Italy called Tuscany whilst I come from Yorkshire; equally as beautiful but not as sunny.

We decided it was time to try a vegetarian dish or two, slight problem neither of us particularly enjoy vegetables. So the next best thing was something with cheese, so Fabio brought some rather unusual pasta for us to try.

leaf shaped pasta
leaf shaped pasta

Four Cheese pasta


So here we go a four cheese spighe pasta bake. Spighe is unusual in that it is shaped like a leaf or some say small tree. It is great for this type of dish because all the little holes fill up with sauce.

smoked garlic, what an aroma
smoked garlic, what an aroma


I peeled and chopped an onion and some garlic ready to fry. I use smoked garlic, it has a great fragrance and sort of sets the scene.


Fabio was in charge of the cheeses, we decided to use a mixture to give a little more flavour to the final dish. So he grated;

2oz blue stilton

2oz Monterey Jack

2oz strong Cornish, you can use any Cheddar style cheese

2oz Parmesan

These are approximate weights and to be honest Fabio was so busy talking he didn’t take much notice of what he was doing. You also need a little cheese grated for the topping which will put a nice crust on the bake.

Chef's tip

when you've gratted your cheese, add a little corn flour to it, this prevents it clogging and will give you cheese sauces a creamy texture.

Four delicious cheeses

four delicious cheeses
four delicious cheeses
you can add a drop of milk to make it even richer.
you can add a drop of milk to make it even richer.
grated cheese
grated cheese

How to cook your pasta


Put the pasta in a saucepan and add water, just enough to cover the pasta. Bring to the boil and then let it simmer for ten minutes, don’t fully cook it, it needs to be firm.

Fry the onion and garlic until almost transparent, add two tablespoons of corn flour and stir in some of the water from your pasta to make a roux keep stirring and now add your cheeses.

Keep stirring as they melt, until they turn into a thick creamy gravy. Now add your herbs;

Rosemary, Thyme, Marjoram, Oregano, Basil, Tarragon, Black Pepper, and for a real flavour kick we added some dried Lavender . Honest it does work with lavender.

The origins of pasta


I had a real argument one time with Fabio over the origins of pasta which he said was definitely an Italian idea; of course he was wrong as usual because in actual fact it came from China via the Arabs to Sicily and then Italy probably long before the Roman Empire. It was not until the 1400’s in Naples before dies were designed to extrude the dough to make some of the modern shapes.

Originally it was eaten dry usually from street vendors until in about 1840 when the first tomato recipe was documented. It was desperation that drove people at first to eat tomatoes, because they were thought to be poisonous. When they were first brought from the New World it was realised that they belonged to nightshade family. The Italian for tomato is pomi d’oro , golden apple but they were still only grown as a houseplant and not for food.

It was an artisan food until in 1824 in northern Italy, the first industrial pasta factory was established by the Agnese family. In November 1827, Giulia Buitoni, a widowed mother of five children, started another pasta factory nearby.

After that as they say the rest is history, pasta became loved and enjoyed all over the western world.

A little salad makes all the difference
A little salad makes all the difference


Okay sorry I forgot about the recipe; so now pour the mix into an oven proof casserole dish and sprinkle on top a layer of cheese. I also sprinkled on a fine dusting of ‘sweet paprika’ to give it colour and taste. Don’t forget that how a meal looks is almost as important as how it tastes, you’ve given your time to this dish so make it look worthy of your effort.

Cook gm5 for 20mins and then gm7 for ten minutes to put a golden top to the bake.

Serve with salad.

Another super idea


The second dish we decided on was a Cannellini bean Bolognese. This dish is a filling and hearty recipe even for us meat eaters, serve with some nice home made bread.

1 tin of chopped tomatoes.

2 onions chopped

4 cloves of garlic chopped

1tbs of cider vinegar, 1tbs of balsamic vinegar.

Rosemary, Thyme, Marjoram, Oregano, Basil, Tarragon, Black Pepper.

1 tin of cannellini beans.

A few mushrooms chopped quite small.

Corn flour for thickening.


Fry the onions first, when they are turning transparent, add the garlic and cook for a few minutes more. Now add 2 tbs of corn flour, add the juice from the tomatoes and a little water; mix to a creamy roux add the beans and then the vinegar and finally the herbs stir well and cook for twenty minutes on a low heat.


Cook some pasta in a saucepan for about twenty minutes until soft and then add into the tomato mix.

sprinkle a little grated cheese on top and serve with love.

Adventure and Romance in the 19th century

Guilty of Honour
Guilty of Honour

Synopsis

Young Ben Stone is fleeing for his life over the bleak Yorkshire Moors. From being a child, he has been besotted by the local landowner’s daughter Ruth, but after her wicked brother is accidentally killed, Ben fears that he will be blamed. Ruth convinces him he should go on the run; otherwise, her father who is also the local magistrate will probably have him hanged for murder.

Trying to keep out of the way of the law, he runs into a wandering band of thieves. They take him as a prisoner and he is forced to endure a desperate winter in their secret lair. When he does escape their clutches, his fortune changes, and he is taken in by a friendly parson. The parson runs a small orphanage in Cartmel, where Ben recovers his health and spirits.

A brief spell working at a chandler’s shop in Barrow in Furness is rudely interrupted when Ben is pressed into the navy. The year is 1801 and the Royal Navy is desperate for men.

Despite this poor start, Ben takes to life in the navy, and quickly gains promotion. He is set for a promising career, when his past returns to haunt him, in the person of Ruth the landowner’s daughter, who has been married off to the new Governor of Jamaica and needs transporting out to the Caribbean on Ben’s ship. During the voyage, Ruth takes the opportunity to revive Ben’s feelings for her.

When he returns to England, he is confronted by his past and has to face a court-martial over the death of Ruth’s brother. Can he clear his name? What part will Lady Ruth play in his future? Ben is in for many varied adventures before his life is settled.

 

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26 comments

JayeWisdom profile image

JayeWisdom 4 years ago from Deep South, USA

Thanks for the veg recipes, Tony. It will probably drive you up the wall when I tell you I also don't eat dairy (!), but there are some terrific soy faux cheeses available that taste like the real thing, so I can make the "cheese" pasta dish.

The cannellini bean Bolognese recipe is out of this world! Thanks a million....

Tony, perhaps you should find just a few veggies you like (at least one of each different color) for your health's sake. You can find wonderful veg dishes. If you toss some Portabello mushrooms into a dish, your guests will swear it contains meat!

Enjoyed the hub. I will have to reciprocate with my Cajun Maque Choix recipe. That's one veg dish you will have to like because the amount of garlic and onions make it special...JAYE


writer20 profile image

writer20 4 years ago from Southern Nevada

Sounds so good I'm going to printed for a little later.

Vote up and interesting


stessily 4 years ago

Tony, Anything with cheese has my attention! Thanks for reminding me of spighe pasta, which had slipped my memory because it's not always stocked in stores. I've been focusing on rotini lately, so I appreciate the reminder that there are many other wonderful forms of pasta to enjoy.

Your recipe with cannellini beans is mouth-watering. As I type this comment, I have cannellini in the crockpot, simmering with carrots and onions; it's leftovers but my special spices wafting through the air even had the cable guy's attention today!

Ciao! Stessily


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

hi jaye

thanks for the reply. I've never heard of the soy faux cheese, I'm sure it is better for you than normal cheese.

I like mushrooms, and that pointed cabbage, and beetroot, but the other stuff, my son likes carrots and turnip; which by coincidence is the food of my favourite meats, so I don't need to eat it they've eaten it for me.

best wishes.


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

HI there!

I hope you enjoy the meal and reading my hub too. Fabio and I try to come up with new twists on old ideas, it's good fun.

take care


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Stessily, so good to hear from you again. What are popular and common cheeses where you live?

I like most pasta dishes, they are so easy to eat. DId you try the lavender yet?

Ciao


stessily 4 years ago

Tony, In the Upper Midwest, cheddar is very popular, as well as Colby (which was invented in Wisconsin), Swiss (because of the Swiss influence), pepper jack, and parmigiano-reggiano (because of Italian influence). They're popular as well in Virginia.

What's popular in your area?

I personally love, love, love cheese. I'm not sure that I have a favorite, although I'm not fond of pepper jack.

I haven't tried lavender yet. My favorite use of lavender is as a bath or beauty product or in candles or as tea. I'll give it a try because my view is that I can never experience too much lavender.

Over and out.


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

I think chedderis popular everywhere, it's a good alrounder.

We have over 400 Englis types of cheese some are just local ones but it is really popular here. Of course we also have French, Swiss, you name it we have it; all except Amerian apart from Montery Jack. My favourite is from North Yokshire in Swaledale, there is an old fashioned creamery there, and their cheeses are wonderful. If you have even seen the animation 'Wallace and Grommit', Wensleyday is there choice.

'see you'


stessily 4 years ago

Tony, I've never tasted Wensleyday cheese; I feel that I owe it to myself to locate some because some of my ancestors hailed from Yorkshire.

The local library has some Wallace and Gromit DVDs. "Close shave" is one of them. Is that a good one for acquainting myself with them? Do they always feature Wensleyday cheese in their episodes?

Over and out.


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

stessily, 'close shave' is great, it's actually Wensleydale cheese, I was on my old laptop when I answered you yesterday, it has some keys which don't work so good, after they were covered in coffee when only two months old. that's my excuse and I'm sticking with it. Most of their escapades involve some cheese.

Yes Wensleydale is the one for me, I've re-read what I wrote, I must have also been dreaming It has nothing to do with Swaledale, although they produce some really fine ewe's milk cheeses.

Yorkshire is divided by a fan shape river system which pivot around the Humber at Hull, these rivers give the areas there names, and divides them into dales. I live in Calderdale, because of the river Calder. Each area has its own cheeses.


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Hi Jaye

I've just hubbed a turkey meal which would be just as good using quorn or some other soy steak. Give it a look and let me know what you think. I'm hoping to finish those other recipes for you for the weekend.

cheers


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Hi

did you watch the 'Wallace and Grommit' dvd yet?

Give it a try if not, you'll be amused, if you understand English humour that is; I know it can be very different, because I've waqtched some of your commediens and not reall 'got it' as you might say. Perhaps I need the babel fish in my ear to help.

ttfn


stessily 4 years ago

Tony, I watched "The Cheesesnatcher Part 1" on YouTube yesterday and thoroughly enjoyed it --- it was "smashing"! It featured Wensleydale, which made me feel quite "peckish".

Me, too, I also don't get some American comedians. I know that it's probably considered anti-American to say this, but I've never really understood the appeal of Jerry Lewis (and the French would also shudder at this since they love him so much) or Jim Carrey, for that matter, although I liked him in "Fun with Dick and Jane."

So I don't know whether babel fish helps.

10/4

Stessily


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

HI Stessily,

you've been busy again, not that I'm complaining, it's always good to hear from you.

George Burns was my intro to American comics, what on earth was he on about???

I must say I don't like our new standup comics here, sadly ever other word is f....... this or that.

I told stories and gags on stage for 30 years and never swore once.

I did like Carrey in the mask, and the one where he has three sons, who are obviously not his. I'm rubbish remembering names.

Curry for tea tonight, [tea being evening meal around here, confussing I know, goes back to the mill days when mum and dad did long shifts. Then you have supper later on.}

ttfn.


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

HI jaye

can you tell me if lentils are popular and readily available in the States?

tony


stessily 4 years ago

Tony, The few snippets which I saw of George Burns made more sense to me than Jerry Lewis; he had a routine with his comic foil/wife Gracie Allen in which she played a dumb, zany, heart-of-gold blonde, which after a short while was too predictable for me.

What were some of your stories and gags and where did you perform?

What kind of curry are you having for tea time?

ttfn


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Stessily,

I didn't understand Jerry Lewis either, Bob hope I liked when he was with Bing, but I heard Bing was pretty mean to his wife and I sort of went off him, I did find him a bit 'smarmy' we call it, a bit too nice even when he was a priest.

curry tonight is simple beef keema, which is mince with a combination of spices, also onions, ginger, garlic.

My gags were mostly one liners, a few stories it always depends on how the audience responds. Where, well clubs, pubs, holiday centres, [by the way that is how centre is spelt, not center.] cruise ships, hotels around Europe, and the British Isles, Russia, India, North Africa.

What is for your tea? by the way I enjoyed your library story.

ttfn


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

stessily I think we need a central chat point, we seem to have so many conversations going on at once, and for a bear with very little brain it is complicated.

see ya!


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Hi Jaye

I've put one or two vegetarian ideas together and I thought I would just let you know.

Cheers, Tony


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Hi Stessily,

I've put a few vegetarian ideas up on hub, I think you've missed a couple of adventures this last week.

cheers

ttfn


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, What finger-licking, lip-smacking, stomach-rumbling great recipes which could be quite persuasive in getting non-vegetarians to allow vegetarianism into their carnivorous lifestyles! In particular, I like the cheese pasta bake. But I'm wondering what you'd use as a substitute for Monterey Jack, of which I'm not particularly fond.

Which do you prefer between Cornish and Cheddar? What is the impact on the taste?

Thank you for sharing the step-by-step instructions and "pretty pictures," voted up + all.

Respectfully, Derdriu


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu

cheese bake is a great anytime meal, I only used MJack for your side of the pond as we rarely see it here; I only know one deli that stocks it, and I must say I can take it or leave it. Try a creamy cheese such as Wenslydale which is my favourite of all. I don't know many American cheeses, you must have thousands of varieties, because we do. There are so many English and British cheeses I don't think I have tried ten percent of them. Cornish is softer than cheddar, so I might eat them with different foods. Cornish with sultana scones and a blob of strawberry jam...just a moment I lost reality for a moment.

many thanks for the votes [I've no idea what they do, can you enlighten me.}

take care

Tony


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, The votes undoubtedly do something, because otherwise why else would they be there she asks ingenuously? At any rate, readers who go to your profile page get to see just how awesome, beautiful, funny, and interesting you are since the votes are tallied just above the list of followers.

Respectfully, Derdriu


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu

good answer, I've only been refered to once in my life as beautiful and thats a long story, well as an adult, maybe as a baby.

I'm sure you take it for granted, people refering to you as beautiful I mean.

Have a nice Easter.

Tony


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, Thank you! I'm sure that if you'd been born in Italy, you'd have been called "beautiful" all your life since women have no problems saying "ciao, bello" to a guy ot telling him he's looking particularly "bello" today.

Respectfully, Derdriu


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu,

Fabio's mother tweeks my cheek and calls me 'chubby chops', and grandma who is now nearly ninety, slaps her knees and giggles when she sees me. Oh well, questa è la vita.

regards Tony

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