Take a Walk With Me (Enjoy the Beauty of Nature)

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My favourite scrambled eggs for breakfast
My favourite scrambled eggs for breakfast | Source

Take a Walk With Me

Greetings friends, readers, and fellow hubbers. Here in Ballogie, Queensland it is a crisp Autumn morning. The sky is blue but there is a cold westerly wind blowing. It is obvious that Winter is just around the corner.

My dear wife, Kathy, has told me that she is expecting something important in the post and asked me, very nicely, if I will go and check the mailbox. I'm happy to do that but first I just need to sit and eat my scrambled eggs I have just finished cooking for breakfast. After that, why don't you join me in a brisk and invigorating walk to collect the mail.

Our Mailbox (notice the correlated iron wallaby)
Our Mailbox (notice the correlated iron wallaby) | Source
A view of our driveway from outside the front door
A view of our driveway from outside the front door | Source

A Little Exercise Never Hurt Anyone

It will be good exercise but not too taxing. We'll get the heart rate up, blood pumping, and metabolism kicking in, but we'll also stop and take in some of the wonderful scenery along the way. Oh, you are probably wondering what I'm going on about. A few steps out the front door and along the path to the mailbox at the gate, no big deal....wrong!

Sorry, I forgot to mention that our driveway from the house to the mailbox is approximately one kilometre (5/8 of a mile), so we'll be covering that distance twice, there and back.

I don't always walk. If it is raining I will have no choice but to drive (in which case I will bundle all three dogs into the back of the Rav4), and sometimes if the sides or middle of the driveway requires mowing I will choose to take the ride-on mower to collect the mail.

I'll make cups of coffee..
I'll make cups of coffee.. | Source

Pikelets

In Australia and New Zealand, small pancakes (about 75 mm in diameter) known as pikelets are eaten. They are traditionally served with jam or whipped cream, or solely with butter, at afternoon tea, but can also be served at morning tea. They are made with milk, self-raising flour, eggs, and a small amount of icing sugar. (source: Wikipedia)

Before We Leave

The mail *contractor normally arrives between 11am and 11:30am so we have a little time to kill. Sit down and make yourselves at home for a moment. I'll make cups of coffee, or tea if you prefer, and we can chat before we begin our walk. *The mail delivery to rural areas in Australia is usually contracted out to private carriers. Here in Ballogie our mail is only delivered three days per week, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Make sure you have on a pair of comfortable walking shoes or joggers, and a bottle of water to ensure you keep hydrated. When everyone's ready, we'll be off.

Oh, by the time we get back it will be lunch time and Kathy has offered to cook some of her delicious pikelets (small pancakes) for when we return. That's something to look forward to, believe me.

Coco hates having her photo taken
Coco hates having her photo taken | Source

Let the Walk Begin

Ok, if everyone's ready, let the walk begin! I hope no one minds, but I always take our Staffy x Kelpie, Coco, with me on a lead. It forces me to keep the pace up and not be lazy because she loves to go for a walk, or should I say run, and tends to strain on the leash.

Don't panic though, Coco is nine years old so she tends to slow down on the way back so we can walk a little more leisurely back up the hill. When she was younger she used to chase the kangaroos and wallabies so I always kept her on the lead, now I sometimes let her run free on the return trip.

Our front garden
Our front garden | Source
Click thumbnail to view full-size
Our front garden contains flowering ornamentals, herbs and vegetabesPomegranate trees against the fenceFranjipani The propagation area, directly outside the window
Our front garden contains flowering ornamentals, herbs and vegetabes
Our front garden contains flowering ornamentals, herbs and vegetabes | Source
Pomegranate trees against the fence
Pomegranate trees against the fence | Source
Franjipani
Franjipani | Source
The propagation area, directly outside the window
The propagation area, directly outside the window | Source

Looking to the left as we walk out the front door you will observe our main garden which is planted along permaculture principles and has flowering plants and ornamentals growing alongside and amongst food plants, herbs and vegetables. Some of the things growing in there include: hibiscus, rosella, galangal, orchids, lavender, ceylon spinach, roses, tomatoes, basil, frangipani, indigo, silverbeet, pepino, mulberry, and daylilies.

Proceeding a little further but still on our left is the fence of the house yard and growing at regular intervals along it are pomegranate trees. Look to the right and you will see a three strand barbed wire fence that follows parallel to the driveway for about half its length. It separates the 50 acre property we live on from bushland of three neighbouring properties.

The bush next door to our house
The bush next door to our house | Source
Olive trees
Olive trees | Source
Coco leads the way
Coco leads the way | Source

Coco is impatient and pulling on her lead to try to make me move on so we better proceed. In fact, if we try to keep pace with her I think some of you may struggle so I'll let her off the leash to run free for now.

Next on the left you will see a paddock that was originally set up as an olive orchard by a previous owner. He used to have an irrigation system in place to water the trees but we don't get enough rainfall now to keep regular water up to them so the irrigation was disconnected. The trees are still there but as far as I know have never born fruit.

The fenced paddock now contains an ex racehorse called Spike and two white donkeys. If you look closely you may see them, and sometimes they will come over to the fence when called. If they do, feel free to pet them. Occasionally there will also be two guinea fowl hanging around with them. At the present time a lovely carpet of purple wildflowers covers much of the ground as you can see.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
If you look closely you can see the two donkeysThere are two guinea fowl hiding in the pictureCoco sets a steady pace
If you look closely you can see the two donkeys
If you look closely you can see the two donkeys | Source
There are two guinea fowl hiding in the picture
There are two guinea fowl hiding in the picture | Source
Coco sets a steady pace
Coco sets a steady pace | Source
Click thumbnail to view full-size
Peaceful bushland settingWild orchids growing from a stumpWild orchids in flower
Peaceful bushland setting
Peaceful bushland setting | Source
Wild orchids growing from a stump
Wild orchids growing from a stump | Source
Wild orchids in flower
Wild orchids in flower | Source

Moving on down the hill and the scenery starts to change with bushland now on both sides of the driveway. I love the trees here and feel the scene would really appeal to a landscape painter.

Not far off the driveway wild orchids can be found growing from the stumps of felled trees, and some are even flowering.

Even though we are getting closer to the road it seems so peaceful here and it is the part of our property where most of the wildlife can be encountered..various bird varieties, kangaroos, wallabies etc. Coco knows this too and pricks her ears, alert to any movement. Fortunately, now that the cooler weather is here, most reptiles such as snakes and goannas should be hibernating so we shouldn't encounter any.

Beautiful bushland including an old fallen iron bark tree
Beautiful bushland including an old fallen iron bark tree | Source
Rocky outcrop and dingo caves
Rocky outcrop and dingo caves | Source

Now if you will cast your eyes to the right you will notice a rocky outcrop and a series of caves of various shapes and sizes. These are dingo(wild native dog) caves, where they sleep and raise their pups. I have checked them out last week and they seem to be unoccupied at the moment (at least during the day). We can go and explore them on the way back if you want. There's nothing to be scared of.. really!

A Dingo cave
A Dingo cave | Source
Click thumbnail to view full-size
The mailbox is in viewThe property gates, only another 100 yardsAnother very old fallen tree (good habitat for ground dwelling creatures)
The mailbox is in view
The mailbox is in view | Source
The property gates, only another 100 yards
The property gates, only another 100 yards | Source
Another very old fallen tree (good habitat for ground dwelling creatures)
Another very old fallen tree (good habitat for ground dwelling creatures) | Source

We are close now. The mailbox is only another 100 yards away so once we are there anyone who's feeling a little weary can take some deep breaths, a sip of water, and pause awhile, if needed, before we make our way back to the house.

The mailbox is on the Chinchilla- Wondai Road which is the main highway linking the towns of Wondai and Kingaroy with Chinchilla. An interesting bit of trivia is that our property/house number is 12204. This indicates that our property is 12204 metres from the Chinchilla post office.

We finally reach the mailbox and the road.
We finally reach the mailbox and the road. | Source
Time to head back to the house
Time to head back to the house | Source

Well, we made it! This is the end of the road, so well done everyone on completing the first half of our walk. Take a moment to catch your breath while I check the mailbox, then we'll turn around and head back. The return trip is slightly uphill but we'll go slow and stop to checkout the dingo caves on the way.

One letter, and not an important one at that..a wasted trip? No, I don't see it that way. I love the opportunity to get some exercise, and embrace the chance to get closer to nature. Besides I had good company.

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The Journey Home

The time has come to begin our journey back to the house. Follow me and we'll take a slight detour off to the left to visit the dingo caves. It's not far, only about 30 yards/metres from the driveway and in fact if you look left you can see the rocky outcrop from here. As a kid I always enjoyed exploring caves and the bush and pretending to be Tarzan or Jungle Jim (if anyone else is old enough to remember that show). I guess I am still a kid at heart and I look forward to my grandchildren visiting so I have an excuse to play there with them.

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The Caves
The Caves
The Caves | Source
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Coco loves exploring
Coco loves exploring | Source

There are half a dozen caves here of varying sizes. They are probably originally natural formations caused by erosion which the dingos have continued to dig out deeper to act as shelter from the weather and in which to have their pups.

You'll notice that most are big enough for a child to stand up in but an adult human would need to stoop. It isn't too difficult to climb up the rocks onto the roof of the caves. Coco knows the easiest way up so just follow her. Although it doesn't seem all that high, the view from up here is wonderful. Just watch your step, I don't want anyone falling or spraining an ankle.

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Now that you've experienced the beauty of the dingo caves we should think about heading back up the track towards the house. If you have a camera and wish to take some photos, now's the time to do it, then we'll be off.

As I said earlier and as you know from the walk down, the return trip is mostly uphill. It is for the most part a gradual climb but there is one section of around a hundred yards that can be testing. OK, let's do it!

Back tracking
Back tracking | Source

Well, we are finally out of the woods (excuse the pun) and although there is still a way to go, at least half of the return journey is complete. Take a look to the right and you can see one of the property's three dams. It provides a constant source of drinking water for the livestock and many wild animals and birds. The water level has got very low during the drought seasons but never been completely empty yet which is a blessing.

As droughts are such a common occurrence in this part of the world it is esential for all larger properties to have at least one dam unless you are blessed to have a permanent stream or bore.

One of the three dams on the property
One of the three dams on the property | Source
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Spike, the ex racehorse
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Spike, the ex racehorse
Spike, the ex racehorse | Source
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Look over there and you can see Spike the horse and the donkeys again. Let's call them over to say "hello." They belong to friends of ours who saved them from the knackery. As I mentioned earlier Spike is an ex racehorse and a gelding, the fate of which when racing days are over, is not rosy. The donkeys were just no longer wanted by their previous owners.

A lot of people out here are into animal and wildlife rescue. Kangaroos, echidnas, koalas, and even turtles are often hit by cars on the highway and most killed, but now and then one will be found still alive and can be taken to one of the wildlife carers in the area who will arrange veterinarian attention. If you come acros a recently killed kangaroo for instance you should always check to see if it is a female and it's pouch to ensure there isn't a live baby still in there. In many cases the Joey can be saved if discovered early enough.

Definition of "Knackery"

"A knacker is a person in the trade of rendering animals that have died on farms or are unfit for human consumption, such as horses that can no longer work. This leads to the slang expression "knackered" meaning very tired, or "ready for the knacker's yard", where old horses are slaughtered and the by-products are sent for rendering. A knacker's yard or knackery is different from a slaughterhouse, where animals are slaughtered for human consumption. In most countries, knackery premises are regulated by law." (source:Wikipedia)

Spike and the Donkeys

Someone's looking tired
Someone's looking tired | Source

That was a welcome break, I think you'd agree. Now, back to the house. We are on the home stretch and I think I can even smell those yummy pikelets cooking. I know it's uphill now for a stretch, and even the dog has slowed down, but let's pick up the pace and finish off with a flourish. We don't want anyone to think we have been dawdling do we? I mean, I always tell Kathy I do this for the exercise. Can't have her thinking otherwise.

I know I'm close to home when the house comes into view..and there it is! Not long now.

The home stretch
The home stretch | Source
The chicken pen and storage shed
The chicken pen and storage shed | Source
The house yard
The house yard | Source

We are now outside the house yard and over to the right you can see the chicken pen and storage shed. However you probably aren't interested in this right now and are looking forward to sitting down and enjoying those pikelets that I keep promoting (I really can smell them now) and a cuppa. Kathy may be upset that the parcel she was expecting didn't arrive, but I'm sure she'll still feed us all. No need to hurry home either, we are quite hospitable in this part of the world and don't get visitors often.

Thank you for joining Coco and I on our trip to the mailbox. We all made it back safe and sound and I enjoyed the company. I hope you also had fun and found it a rewarding experience. It was great being able to share a little bit of my world with you, with a touch of exercise thrown in.

We will see you again soon, and feel free to drop in next time you are passing by.

Home again
Home again | Source

Thanks for Reading

Thank you for reading this extremely long hub. I have never attempted to write one of this magnitude before. In fact this is only the second time ever I have used all my own photographs, and first time taking my own video. I hope it wasn't boring.

© 2015 John Hansen

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Comments 89 comments

Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 17 months ago from The Beautiful South

Thanks you John; I loved the walk to your mailbox, the video and all your photos! Great of you to invite us along and I can only imagine the peace of being so isolated! Beautiful country.

(I once had a dingo!)

Up and shared.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Jackie, thank you for joining me on the walk to my mailbox :) and being the first to read and comment on this hub. The best part of living here is being surrounded by nature and the peace and quiet. Really, you had a dingo? Please tell me all about how that came to be. They are beautiful dogs. Thank for the vote up and share.


drbj profile image

drbj 17 months ago from south Florida

This journey was so realistic, Jodah, I almost felt like I was taking that hike to the mailbox with you all. What a peaceful serene-looking place to live. Thanks for sharing all your photos and impressions.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you drbj, glad you enjoyed the walk. Seriously, it is a lovely place to live and I'm happy I could share the photos.


CrisSp profile image

CrisSp 17 months ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

Well, thank you for the wonderful walk. I truly enjoyed it. This is my favourite hub for the day.

What a delightful read! Love the descriptive easy to read style of writing and the video and photos are amazing.

Voted +++ .


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for taking the time to walk with me Cris. So glad you enjoyed the writing, photos and video. Wow! your favourite hub of the day.. what a great compliment. Thanks so much.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 17 months ago from southern USA

Oh, John, thank you so much for allowing us to tag along on your "walk about" or is that phrase only used in that movie? Anyway, this is a most phenomenal hub here and not too long for my taste! If you had made it any shorter, we would have missed out on all of the sights going to and fro. Yes, that is one way to get in the exercise : ) I truly enjoyed the walk, as I felt as though I was right there with you in those amazing photos you have shared. What does knackery mean? I have not heard that word before. I love your garden right outside your door too. It may be commonplace to you to see kangaroos hopping about, but we would be so fascinated to see them out in the wild like that, especially my grands would have a fit. Australia is such a cool place to live. I keep forgetting you are south of the equator and about to experience winter. We are heading into summer when June hits.

Up ++++ tweeting, pinning, G+ and sharing

Continue peace and blessings to you and your family


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Faith, thanks for joining me on my "walkabout". That's one of my favourite movies of all time by the way Actually it is a term that relates to aboriginal Australians. At one time most businesses/employers didn't like to hire Aboriginal workers because they were likely to disappear with no notice and "go walkabout." Because they were a nomadic people, members of the tribe would sometime go off into the bush for days at a time alone..maybe in search of game or to visit other tribes, or to communicate with the spirit world. If you'd like a more educated answer it may be good to look up "walkabout" on Wikipedia or a Google search.

As for a knackery. I'll quote Wikipedia "A knacker is a person in the trade of rendering animals that have died on farms or are unfit for human consumption, such as horses that can no longer work. The place where they work is called a knackery." I included the full description after the video as other reader may question it as well. Glad you enjoyed this hub and appreciate the vote up, tweet, pin and share. Blessings.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 17 months ago from southern USA

Thanks, John, for the additional information. That is all so very interesting, and you should maybe do a hub about "walkabout". Oh, your answer is quite enlightening!

I appreciate the explanation as to what a knacker is, as we don't use that word or term here in the U.S., as far as I know. I love all of the different words and phrasings from other countries. Well, off to bed for me ... then back up again early.

Blessings


sallybea profile image

sallybea 17 months ago from Norfolk

Jodah

I very much enjoyed reading this hub. There is something magical about walking out and about in nature and with the things which live in it - except for the snakes of course. I imagine that a very warm day in Australia provides some interesting specimens. It reminds me a little of South Africa where I sometimes encountered a Puff Adder ... shudder! I can admire them from a distance but close up encounters are not something I enjoy.

I can see where the expression 'docile donkey' comes from Interesting color donkeys, the ones I have seen have always been grey.

Thanks for sharing this part of your life with us.

Sall


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Sally, thank you for joining me on my walk. Fortunately there weather is cooling down with Winter almost upon us so it is becoming too uncomfortable for reptiles like snakes to be out. Most are hibernating or whatever they do when it's cold. Carpet pythons and red bellied black snakes are probably most common around here. Thanks for your great comment.


annart profile image

annart 17 months ago from SW England

Boring, John?! You're kidding! What a wonderful place you have, in such a beautiful part of the world. That must be the best trip to the mailbox ever. I don't even have to go out of the house for mine!

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this and you took me on a magical trip where I could see all the wonders along the way. Your photos are brilliant.

Thanks for entertaining me this morning, John. My best to you and Kathy.

Ann


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Ann, what a wonderful comment Ann. I'm glad you enjoyed the trip to the mailbox and the wonders on the way. Thank you for reading, the compliments, and well wishes too.


bravewarrior profile image

bravewarrior 17 months ago from Central Florida

What a wonderful excursion, John! I really enjoyed the trip. The scenery is amazing; something I've only seen in movies. You really do have a piece of paradise on Earth. I hope you take us with you again the next time you go to check the mail.

Awesome, awesome hub!


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Shauna, I am so glad you enjoyed the little excursion to the mailbox, and yes you are most welcome again anytime :) It is easy to take the scenery and local nature for granted, so I thought I should share with you all. Thanks for the kind comment.


whonunuwho profile image

whonunuwho 17 months ago from United States

Great work my friend. Beautiful photos and interesting article. You are to be envied by all in such a wonderland. whonu


mary615 profile image

mary615 17 months ago from Florida

Oh, no....this Hub was not boring! I enjoyed the walk with you very much. Your dirt road reminded me of the dirt roads I enjoyed when I was growing up in the country; no paved roads then.

I enjoyed your photos very much, love your garden.

Thanks for sharing. I'd love to visit Australia and see all this for myself.

Voted UP, etc. and shared.


Frida Rose profile image

Frida Rose 17 months ago from Maryland

Wow, as a city girl, I found your walk very fascinating. I don't see dirt roads or gardens as beautiful as yours often. Thanks for allowing us to tag along!


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 17 months ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

Wow! John I'm breathless, and that's just from taking in the beautiful country side. If I had to walk six miles to the mail box, I'd never get any post, but the dog would be estatic. :) A brilliant write, you're blessed, thank you for sharing. My best always.


billybuc profile image

billybuc 17 months ago from Olympia, WA

What a great adventure, John. Boy, you really do live out in the toolies as we say here. Not a soul in sight. I would be in heaven, quite frankly. I love the open spaces and no humans in view. Looks to me like you have your own slice of paradise there. Thanks for letting me walk with you. Now I'm green with jealousy.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for visiting whonu, your comments are always appreciated. I am glad you enjoyed the photos.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for joining me on my walk Mary.I am glad you found it enjoyable and that the dirt road brought back memories. I hope you get to visit Australia for real some day.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks Frida, glad you enjoyed the walk. Dirt roads have their downside during the rainy weather but the landscape and natural surrounding more than make up for that.


Harishprasad profile image

Harishprasad 17 months ago from India

John, this is a beautiful piece of writing. Not for a moment I felt leaving the page. In fact, I relished it much ; you made it so endearing with vivid details. You have a wonderful home amid such beauty of nature. I also liked knowing about the kindness showered on the affectionate beings called as tired. You described them with a loving heart. I loved and enjoyed reading this hub. Of course, this hub is a great place to visit again. Voted up and shared.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Jo, sit down and catch your breath :) It is only two kilometres (not six miles). I'll have to go back and check what I wrote in the hub. I'm sure your dog would love the walk though..mine does. Thanks for your kind words. Cheers.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Glad you enjoyed the adventure Bill. I thought for a minute there you called me "John Boy" :) I guess where I iive is a little bit like the Waltons haha. It is quite a special place that we sometimes take for granted. I hope you get your farm in the country soon and you don't need to be jealous you have done very well with what you have in town.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Glad to have you along on the walk Harish, and so glad you enjoyed it and weren't bored. Thank you for the kind comments about this hub and my writing and I hope you visit this page again.


Barbara Kay profile image

Barbara Kay 17 months ago from USA

This was interesting to see what life is like across the world. I thought dingoes are dangerous. Are they? The ones at the zoo seem wild and at one of the zoos one killed a little girl. Life can be so different from one continent to the next. Thanks for the trip.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for coming on the trip with me Barbara. Yes dingoes can be dangerous, they are wild animals and on a couple of occasions children have been killed by them. However they usually avoid people in their natural habitat and I haven' seen any at these caves for some time. Some people have domesticated dingoes and the kelpie breed of dog is actually part dingo.


Mr Archer profile image

Mr Archer 17 months ago from Missouri

How awesome! I enjoyed this walk immensely! Reminds me of my walking days, both those in the woods of my youth and those of my present in the town. Great enjoyment and a hearty well done!! Mike


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for joining me on this walk too Mike. So glad you enjoyed it and that it brought back pleasant memories of your walking days. Cheers.


Larry Rankin profile image

Larry Rankin 17 months ago from Oklahoma

Nothing I love more than a good walk. Very entertaining.


lambservant 17 months ago

This was as wonderful a walk as I've ever taken! Always wanted to see Australia! I forgot your season's are opposite ours! Thanks for sharing!


MizBejabbers profile image

MizBejabbers 17 months ago from Arkansas

John, I think your tour was just grand, and you should become a tour guide. Your home is a very interesting place, and the donkeys are just precious. Made me want to pet them. I'm curious about the dingoes. Can you have domestic cats or small dogs at your little outpost? We have coyotes that run along our river trail, and if anyone's cat wanders too far, it usually doesn't come back after a few trips. A few small dogs in our neighborhood disappeared, and we don't know if they were stolen or became coyote dinner. So you're just going into winter, and we are heading into warm weather. I guess that could make for a cold trip to the mailbox. Love your photos and your little metal wallaby. Voted up+++ and shared.


Emese Fromm profile image

Emese Fromm 17 months ago from The Desert

What a beautiful place you live in! I'd love to live in a place like that, it must be so nice! Thank you for bringing us along on your walk. I really enjoyed it. I love that you named your dog Coco, I have a cat with the same name, even same spelling :).


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 17 months ago from USA

Great walk, John. I'll be counting this as my exercise for the day! I enjoyed the donkey and horse video, all the photos, and the information about the knackery. Voted up and more!


Dana Tate profile image

Dana Tate 17 months ago from LOS ANGELES

I enjoyed taking a walk with you. Thank u for sharing. The photos were breathtaking


MsDora profile image

MsDora 17 months ago from The Caribbean

What a scenic, invigorating, pleasurable walk to the mailbox. Thanks for the invitation. Great activity, great read!


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for coming along Larry, glad you enjoyed the walk. Cheers.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

It was good to have you along on the walk Lori. So glad you enjoyed it. Yes while you are warming up, we down under and cooling off. Thanks for reading.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

I'm glad you came along on the walk MizB, it was my first time as a tour guide and I enjoyed the experience. Come pet the donkeys anytime. I imagine dingos and coyotes have similar tendencies, both being wild dogs, though you don't see pics of dingos howling at the moon. They don't bark either. We have domestic cats and two small toy poodles, but The people who were living here prior to us apparently had two small dogs go missing. We have been told to always keep them in an enclosed yard unless we are with them. We have been here almost 10 years and only had one dog go missing early on..plenty of chickens though. Dingos do tend to be shy and you rarely see them except on places like Fraser Island where the tourists feed them and they have become a pest, raiding camp sites at night and even killing one boy. I prefer to journey to the mailbox in the cooler weather, I don't return lathered in sweat :) thanks for taking the tour and for the vote up.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hello Emese, Somglad you came along and enjoyed the scenery. It is a lovely place. Really, Coco the cat? Good choice of name :) thanks for the kind comment.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Sure thing Flourish, feel free to count this as your daily exercise. I do. Glad you liked the video, photos and information, thank you for coming along, and the vote up etc.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for coming along with me on my walk Dana. So glad you had fun and loved the scenery. Blessings.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

What nice words to describe the walk MsDora, "scenic, invigorating, pleasurable". Glad you came along and enjoyed it. Really, thank you for reading and the kind comment.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 17 months ago from California

You live in beautiful country John! Thank you for sharing this bit of it with us!


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you Audrey, it was a pleasure to share. Glad you enjoyed it.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 17 months ago from High desert of Nevada.

Thank you, Jodah, for a wonderful outing and journey of discovery. You have a lovely home and surrounding property. It is the kind of place some people in American would love to vacation at to explore Nature. Awesome pikelets, Kathy! Perfect ending to our walk.

I so enjoyed reading your hub and admired the photos and video, Jodah. This must have have been quite a job to put together in such a great format. Well done.

Up ++++ and H+


cam8510 profile image

cam8510 17 months ago from Columbus, Georgia until the end of November 2016.

John, what a delightful hub. Thanks for leading us on a walk to your mailbox. Very creative and effective. I can only say that I hope this is not the only walk I take in Australia. My goal is to get there sometime in the next decade. I should still be able to go on a Walkabout, even at that advanced age.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

I'm glad you came on the walk with me Phyllis. Thanks for the generous comment, and yes those pikelets were just delightful weren't they? I had been thinking of doing a hub like this for awhile but was reluctant to take on so much work. I kept forgetting to take my camera/iPad when I went to check the mail, and didn't have enough photos either. I finally remembered..then I had no excuse. Once I started it took me about three days to complete. I am so happy it worked out successfully. Thanks for the vote up and share too.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for coming on this short walk Chris. It would have been child's play for an experienced trekker like you. I do hope you get to realise your dream to visit and explore Australia..there are some amazing places scattered around this country. Never too old for a walkabout.


lollyj lm profile image

lollyj lm 17 months ago from Washington KS

I enjoyed so much accompanying you on your trek to the mailbox. Loved the pictures and video. What a lovely place you have!! This is an excellent hub, very well written. Well done!!


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 17 months ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

Hello John. Sure, I guess if you like the outdoors, fresh air, pastoral settings and serenity this is a great walk. If you are into sunrises and sunsets and being serenaded by birds, that walking path, known as the road to the mailbox offers all that. If you are inspired by the sun and friendly companionship of dogs, and a landscape painter’s vista then you are in your element.

.

Thanks for sharing.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Yes Mike, well if you don't like any of those things then this walk would be quite a trial and downright difficult. We actually have to drive along that "walking path" :) Thanks for reading and your comment.


manatita44 profile image

manatita44 17 months ago from london

Beautifully written and very descriptive article. Sounds like a walk that I would love, but is it quiet? Nice and original idea and well-written too. Long way to travel for a letter. I saw some of those post boxes in New Zealand too. Still, the walk must be enjoyable especially with the animals.

Seems that you definitely need the vehicle of which you speak. Peace, Bro.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for taking the walk with me Manatita. Yes it is very quite apart from the occasional bird song, at least until you get close to the main road, but traffic is rather sparse in this area. I always prefer to walk unless it is raining or too hot. Peace.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for taking the walk with me Manatita. Yes it is very quite apart from the occasional bird song, at least until you get close to the main road, but traffic is rather sparse in this area. I always prefer to walk unless it is raining or too hot. Peace.


Michael-Milec profile image

Michael-Milec 17 months ago

Hi Jodah.

So traces of the 'lost' Garden of Eden seemingly still can be find in...Australia. Beautiful landscape my friend, no wonder that your inspiration for great writing are coming to you zoo bountifully. Thank you for revealing your secret. .. It was a pleasant walk, by your permission I would like to do at least one more round since my daily rout is four miles plus, then when we come back, we will have enough time for finishing those yummy pikelets.

Voted up and beautiful.

Peace.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Michael, so glad you enjoyed the short walk through my Garden of Eden. You are most welcome to do another round to make up your daily walking quota. There will still be a few pikelets left hopefully :) Thank you for the vote up too.


Gwenneth Leane profile image

Gwenneth Leane 17 months ago from Glen Osmond, Adelaide, South Australia Australia

That was a lovely tale. I loved all your pictures


ChitrangadaSharan profile image

ChitrangadaSharan 17 months ago from New Delhi, India

This is a very interesting hub and not at all boring.

I enjoyed the walk and the lovely nature alongside. Such scenery is rare for people living in metro cities.

Your pictures are wonderful and your home looks so inviting.

What an intelligent way to put an all inclusive hub!

Thanks for sharing and voted up!


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for reading this hub Gwenneth and for your kind comment. Glad you liked the pictures.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for joining me on this walk Chitrangada. So glad you enjoyed the scenery along the way.I appreciate your kind comment, share and vote up. Have a great day.


Frank Atanacio profile image

Frank Atanacio 17 months ago from Shelton

Jodah, what a wonderful exhausting walk LOL love the photos my friend


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Frank. it was good to have you along. You must admit it was a good way to exercise. :)


jhamann profile image

jhamann 17 months ago from Reno NV

A great walk I was just able to enjoy with you and your dogs, and I love long walks and dogs. Awesome hub. Jamie


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks Jamie, it was great to have you join the walk. Who doesn't love walking with dogs :) glad you enjoyed this hub.


Rana Pecarski profile image

Rana Pecarski 17 months ago from Texas

I really enjoyed this. I love the photos. They remind me of my home in rural East Texas.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hello Rana, always good to see a new face and glad you enjoyed this walk to my mailbox. I'd love to see photos of your home in rural East Texas too. It must be a beautiful area.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

This is a very enjoyable and interesting hub, Jodah. I loved seeing the environment around your home and learning about the area.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for reading Alicia, glad you found the walk enjoyable and the scenery interesting.


Ericdierker profile image

Ericdierker 17 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

What a great walk. I try to walk a few miles everyday and wish I had the wonderful countryside on each one of them. Thank you for sharing this with us.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for coming along on the walk Eric. I should do it everyday, but it usually works out only about twice a week for one reason or another. It is good countryside. I appreciate the comment


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 17 months ago from The Beautiful South

Been meaning to get back; sorry to take so long! Yes, I got the female dingo through someone who knew a couple in service who couldn't keep it. I lived on 14 acres in the boonies and wanted protection and it took me several days to realize my dog didn't bark and then that I had to teach it to. Long story short she was sweet but I didn't keep her and lucky her maybe since the little dog I got ended up dead from a copperhead bite. Copperheads killed so many things not all mine I finally moved because of them. Even had ones mouth right against my foot when I looked down once and I did some olympics that day from one spot. My husband killed it though and we assume the belly being full of eggs is all that kept it from getting me. Then he gave the poisonous moving head to my son to take to school (in a jar) with me screaming every minute we would be called to come and get it but I was wrong, the teacher and all the kids loved it and it was all I could do to finally get the thing buried!!

Just sharing one of my walks; lol.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for sharing that Jackie. I wondered how someone living in the States came to have a dingo. It must have been scary having to live with all those copperheads. I'm sure the kids at school loved the head in a jar. Have a great day.


Genna East profile image

Genna East 17 months ago from Massachusetts, USA

Thank you, John, for sharing the cup of coffee with us, and this lovely walk with you and Coco. (She is so cute.) I feel as though I’ve had my cardio for the day. :-) I enjoyed the photos (beautiful, interesting country), and I can understand why carrying water is a good idea. It was fascinating to see the dingo caves, and heartwarming to learn about the wildlife rescue efforts of Kangaroos, echidnas, koalas. Great hub. Voted up +++ and shared.


Kristen Howe profile image

Kristen Howe 17 months ago from Northeast Ohio

John, that's some walk to the mailbox, three times a week. What a long wait. This wasn't boring but amusing with lovely photos to go with this insightful essay on the trip to the mailbox. Voted up!


Eric Flynn profile image

Eric Flynn 17 months ago from Providence, Rhode Island

Quite the life you have out there Jodah. I always think of how different all the human experiences are across the world. Every time I check my mail before running up my apartment stairs I'll think of your journey.

EWF


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for joining the walk with us Genna. Coco is a wonderful dog. Glad you enjoyed hub and it was good to share a little about where I live. I appreciate the vote up and share too.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for reading and commenting Kristen. Yes it is quite a walk for the mail. Glad you found this an insightful and amusing essay and enjoyed the photos.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Good to see you Eric, yes we lead quite diverse lifestyles across the globe don't we. It makes things more interesting. Be careful running up those stars to your apartment.


Marie Flint profile image

Marie Flint 16 months ago from Jacksonville, FL

I love to walk, and I loved this casual stroll to the mailbox with you, John.

Colloquialisms fascinate me. Knackers, pikelets, wallabies, and other Aussie words are not part of my every day vocabulary, and I enjoy reading them and hearing them with my inner ear.

Apparently readers like the personal touch in first-person voice, as I see the number and length of comments.

Thank you so much for this heart-warming share. Voted Up and Awesome.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 16 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for joining me on the walk a well Marie. Yes it is quite a pleasant stroll to collect the mail. I have thought about writing a whole hub on Australian colloquialisms and slang, as I think my international friends would enjoy it. This type of casual and personal writing does seem popular too and I was impressed by the response to this hub. I appreciate your generous comment and vote up. Have a great week.


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 15 months ago from Stillwater, OK

This was great, John. I enjoyed seeing a piece of Australia, and learning a little about the area. It honestly sounds wonderful, even walking so far to the mailbox. Good thing I brought my camera for wildlife, eh?


Jodah profile image

Jodah 15 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for joining me on the walk Deb, and for bringing you camera. Hope you captured some good wildlife pics :) Have a great weekend.


Mel Carriere profile image

Mel Carriere 15 months ago from San Diego California

I hope Kathy made enough pikelets for everybody, because I'm hungry after that little walk. You live in a paradise, and I envy your splendid isolation out there in the countryside. My walk to the mailbox consists of walking across about 20 feet of hot asphalt. Great hub!


Jodah profile image

Jodah 15 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for joining the walk Mel :) I'll get Kathy to put another batch of pikelets on to cook. Yes, we do have a nice outlook where we live. Thanks for the comment.


alancaster149 profile image

alancaster149 14 months ago from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire)

Hub-pages should add an 'Entertaining' box to the 'Useful' and 'Interesting' etc.

Nice, pleasant short walk, John. Probably still warmer than we'd get here at that time of year. I take it you're some way away from a river or lake - no crocs. What about the wriggly and crawly things such as diamond-back snakes and funnel-web spiders? Dingos usually avoid human contact and probably find enough to eat, don't they.

We just have to go to the front door for our mail, and that's brought by Royal Mail 'posties' - although there have been a few hiccups like wrong deliveries. Honesty's another issue. Some posties have been known to dump their work or stash it away at home, unable to bring themselves to part with it.

Our property is about 100 yards deep in total by about sixteen feet in breadth (terraced house, back garden and front 'patch' to the street wall. Not much of a challenge, about two or three minutes' walk).

I don't mind a hike, having crossed the North Yorkshire Moors from west to east, south to north, and half the length of Wensleydale, over into Swaledale and back a different way to W'dale the day after. Mind you, it was autumn when I did the walks and the worst that could happen was to be bitten by an adder - but you'd have to be pretty foolish for that to happen, like by lifting stones on the moortops.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 14 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Alan, we have three dams on the property but the nearest waterways are the Stuart and Boyne Rivers around 20 kilometres away north and south of here and Home Creek. We live too far south to have to be worried about crocodiles however. They mainly inhabit waterways in the far north of Australia and don't venture south of Rockhampton in Central Queensland. I am in South Eastern Queensland. We do get snakes but they too prefer to avoid humans where possible, as do the dingos. We also have bush funnel webs which can pose a problem during prolonged rainy periods when they sometimes enter the house to escape the water. It is interesting to read the diversity of where people live. Glad you found this entertaining.

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