ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Pets and Animals»
  • Farm Animals & Livestock

Honeybees And The Fight Against Terrorism

Updated on March 31, 2010
GarnetBird profile image

Gloria taught for many years, and also worked as a mental health group facilitator.

The Sweetest Solution?

Two wild bees on a thistle; crab spider in center.
Two wild bees on a thistle; crab spider in center.
A wild bee on a plant known as "Ranger's Button" in So. California.
A wild bee on a plant known as "Ranger's Button" in So. California.
The study is called The Stealthy Insect Sensor Project.
The study is called The Stealthy Insect Sensor Project.

Bees sniff almost as accurately as Canines..

In the fight against terrorism, bees can detect the vapors from TNT, C-4 Plastic Explosives, and propellants. Their sense of smell rivals that of dogs, Researchers have discovered. Experiments conducted at Los Alamos National Lab indicate that the humble Honeybee may make a significant contribution in the area of National Security.

This would mean more help from Nature in uncovering such dire devices as roadside bombs and suicide bomber belts. Once trained, bees use their proboscis to demonstrate the presence of chemicals associated with these oft undetected weapons. The proboscis is used by bees to also denote the presence of nectar.

Although far from battle-ready, Honeybees may unlock new doors in the struggle to locate IEDS {improvised explosive devices}. Already pollinators account for one third of the world's food supply..could they also be used to protect it?

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • GarnetBird profile image
      Author

      Gloria Siess 5 years ago from Wrightwood, California

      Beats me!! haha.Thanks for reading!

    • Theophanes profile image

      Theophanes 5 years ago from New England

      Very neat but how do a train a bee?? Is someone running around following one all day to see what it does? Odd.

    • thevoice profile image

      thevoice 7 years ago from carthage ill

      great photos hub thanks

    • Michael Shane profile image

      Michael Shane 7 years ago from Gadsden, Alabama

      Nicely done GarnetBird! Hey, you tried to send me some pics but they did not show up! I wuold like to see them....Thanks

    • GarnetBird profile image
      Author

      Gloria Siess 7 years ago from Wrightwood, California

      Thank you; the photos are from the So. California Mts.-I named my ebay store after wild bees (The BookHIVE) God Bless-Garnet

    • profile image

      "Quill" 7 years ago

      Awesome Hub and one worth looking further into...well done Sister...

      Blessings

    • GarnetBird profile image
      Author

      Gloria Siess 7 years ago from Wrightwood, California

      Oh, THANK you. I love bees (from a distance anyway).

    • valeriebelew profile image

      valeriebelew 7 years ago from Metro Atlanta, GA, USA

      I am impresssed. This is informative, and for me it is news. I had never heard anything like this before. It is also well written, and flows smoothly.