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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (8 posts)

Why do some like pets and some do not?

  1. Ms Dee profile image88
    Ms Deeposted 6 years ago

    Why do some like pets and some do not?

    I've never desired to have a pet and likely never will. It is not worth the extra work. Why is that? Why do people want and like having a pet?

  2. Diana Lee profile image83
    Diana Leeposted 6 years ago

    I think the reason some people like pets more than others is because the pet lovers grew up around them and find pets to be an important part of the family.  Perhaps people who do not have pets or never will depends on their lifestyle. Some tenants are not allowed to have pets where they live. Another reason could be, they had a bad experience around pets. If you ever got bit by an animal as a child it could lead to a fear still there as an adult.

  3. Amy Becherer profile image74
    Amy Bechererposted 6 years ago

    I believe we grow up and are influenced watching our parents, neighbors, teachers, peers and their families. I love dogs and especially my Scottish Terrier.  Not surprisingly, my family had two dogs (one at a time), specifically Scotties. My dad, a quiet, generous, hero for the downtrodden, after working hard at rotating shifts for Anheuser-Busch, would come home from the night shift and watch the sunrise while sitting outside or walking with our Scottie. He spoke of that time as his favorite time of the day. When I look into the beautiful, black eyes of my Scottie, MacGregor, I am reminded of my dad, now gone 10-years, I know my dad would love MacGregor and that makes me feel very connected to my dad, in a real way, everyday.   

    Pragmatically speaking, dogs are a lot of work, expensive and require committed responsibility.  Just like humans, canines have breed-specific health and personality trait issues that cannot be ignored.  They require frequent trips outside to relieve themselves and clean-up yard maintenance. I now live in an apartment, where I pay an extra $25 in my rent to keep my dog in residence. If he should damage the rental property, I would be liable for any damage.  I had just finalized a divorce and was moving into my apartment (one of the few that still allows a dog), when I was laid off from my job of 13-years due to the failing economy. Initially in a panic, I became depressed at the reality of the nightmare situation that had I had feared and kept me in my marriage too long. The fact that MacGregor needed me, wagged his tail when he looked at me and looked forward to everyday with me, saved me,  My dogs love is unconditional, something I value and have found nowhere else.  My life would be far less without the companionship of the canines I have shared my space, time and love with here on earth.

  4. Ms Dee profile image88
    Ms Deeposted 6 years ago

    These responses helped me realize, that's right, I'd not grown up around pets! Amy's helps me understand better the love one can have for a pet by sharing these two examples. I think Amy's is a good start to a great hub that would help people like me.

  5. teaches12345 profile image95
    teaches12345posted 6 years ago

    I know of someone who does not like dogs or cats because he had a bad experience with them. I agree with Diana Lee in that when people are raised with animals/pets it becomes a natural affection and connection.

  6. rainnie526 profile image60
    rainnie526posted 6 years ago

    I don't know. I am the one who loves pets, and I can't understand why some people hates them. Maybe they think pets are dirty, or just have bad memories that they have been frightened by dogs or something. It's OK if people don't like them, but should not try to hurt them. I really look down on those who treat animals badly.
    Pets can help you relaxed. In daily life, when your feel upset, they will company you and try to cheer you up. They are always happy and indulgent to humans. They need being taken care of, which gives people a sense of responsibility.
    My mother used to be hate dogs, because she was bitten by a huge dog. However, after Fluffy, a small puppy came to my home and became one of my family, he totally changed my mother's mind. Not only my mom, but also my dad was glade to play with him. When my dog got lost last year, my parents felt very sad, running everywhere to find him.

  7. urgurl_bri profile image83
    urgurl_briposted 6 years ago

    Everyone has different tastes in stuff.  Some people like kids and others don't.  It's all a matter of opinion.    Maybe some people grew up around animals and always had them in their homes, so they want to have them when they're older as well.  Others may have even had an animal in their home but maybe their was an incident, such as a dog biting them or something along those lines, that makes them not like animals now.  Others just might not like having to take on the responsibility.  But again, everyone is different.  There's no wrong opinions.

  8. ULinder profile image60
    ULinderposted 6 years ago

    I find it is often a cultural norm in certain places of the world to see pets, especially dogs and cats, as being dirty street animals.  Also, many people who had a bad experience with an animal at a young age can end up having fears of those same animals later in life.

    Just like with anything else, the way someone saw their parents treat and react to pet animals while they were growing up can greatly affect that persons outlook on having/liking pets.

 
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