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What is the best way to train a dog to "heel" when going for a walk?

  1. GiblinGirl profile image82
    GiblinGirlposted 5 years ago

    What is the best way to train a dog to "heel" when going for a walk?

  2. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 5 years ago

    While you are walking just jerk on the chain and stop and say sit. When it does? Give it a treat. One important thing is never use the dog's name. It will confuse it. Just say sit. It may take a few days? But, It will work.  smile

    1. GiblinGirl profile image82
      GiblinGirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for the advice.  I had been using my dog's name when trying to get her to heel, but I'll give it a try with just "sit."

    2. profile image0
      JThomp42posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Your'e very welcome!!

    3. agilitymach profile image98
      agilitymachposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Here's a video about the dog whisper you say works so well.  Sure.  Kick me and I'll behave.  But it destroys trust.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buUHYM9ymc8
      I've trained over a thousand dogs with positive methods.  Very high reactive agility dogs.

    4. profile image0
      JThomp42posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm sure Ceaser has trained 100 times that. Everyone knows he's the best. He doesn't mistreat dogs. He loves them!!

    5. agilitymach profile image98
      agilitymachposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      CM is selling a product - himself.  Good TV shows aggressive dogs, so kicking them to react is what he does.  I am not selling anything. smile University studies have shown positive methods to be more effective.  We'll have to agree to disagree.

  3. ptosis profile image76
    ptosisposted 5 years ago

    If the dog is a puller, stop, walk backwards or change direction. Dog pulling can be broken. Also have tiny treats. Drop a treat behind your foot. Pretty soon will quit  pulling.

    Go on youtube on dog training . they have great videos how-tos

    1. GiblinGirl profile image82
      GiblinGirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks - I had tried using treats before but I wasn't really sure how to give her the treat while we were walking.  I'll try dropping it between my feet.

  4. agilitymach profile image98
    agilitymachposted 5 years ago

    Whoa!!  I totally disagree with the need to pull or "pop" the dog with a training collar on.  I mean - that's something we did back in the dark ages!!!  Way old school.

    I do agree with going in opposite directions to get your dog to focus on you.  A video will best explain this process, so as I haven't made a "loose leash walking" hub yet, I'll go look for one.

    Here's one.  I train my students a bit differently.  For example, I don't use the name when calling the dog, but it doesn't matter if you do or not unless you are aiming for competition.  (All of my students are aiming for competition.) I also never bend over as that can actually send the dog away from you (something agility competitors know all too well).  Also, notice that she gives tons of rewards in the form of praise.  I think she hands out a few treats too when the dog comes back to her.  Treats should never be a bribe though, so only pull them out of your pocket after the dog returns to your side. If you dog isn't motivated by praise or treats, then toys or whatever works great. Notice the high pitched voice.  That makes it all a game, and fun for the dog!!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJ-qvYh7TVU

    I'd Google "loose leash walking positive dog" to find more modern, positive methods for teaching this behavior.

    BTW, never put a training collar on a dog who's growth plates are not closed.  Necropsies on dogs who have had metal training collars used show neck damage - something you ant to avoid.  I used to train with punishment, btw, but switched over a decade ago to positive methods.  My dogs are MUCH happier and the bond between us is MUCH better!!

    Also, are you looking for a strict obedience competition 'Heel" with the dog on the left, shoulder lined up to your pants leg?  If so, then that would require a bit of a different training.  All of my dogs can both loose leash walk and do a performance "heel" depending on what I ask for.  I don't want my dogs to do a performance "heel" during walks though.  That's their time to enjoy, sniff and have fun.  Here's a video of what "heel" actually looks like:  It's right at the beginning of the vid.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TL6kxsTVo9U

    I also recommend that you join a positive reinforcement obedience class where this easy behavior and more can be taught to you correctly.  There are a million mistakes you can make training at home.  BTW, if you read my profile, you'll see my experience. smile  I've trained over a thousand dogs. smile

    1. Ari Lamstein profile image81
      Ari Lamsteinposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Great answer!  I loved the videos too.

    2. profile image0
      Larry Wallposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      With all due respect, different breeds need different methods. I had a Lab Mix that was hard to control. The pinch collar worked in about a week.  My beagles only required praise and a treat. I have a special yoke where I can walk two using 1 leash.

    3. GiblinGirl profile image82
      GiblinGirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks so much for all the info (especially about not bending over) and the helpful videos.  I'm really looking for more loose leash walking than a strict command.

    4. profile image0
      JThomp42posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Have you ever watched the Dog Whisperer? Works for him. smile

    5. agilitymach profile image98
      agilitymachposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Larry, I'd have to write a hub or a book, but in only one in 1,000 cases have I had to resort to a metal training collar to teach loose leash walking.  People turn to those methods because the people fail - not because the method or dog does.

    6. profile image0
      Larry Wallposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      This was an unusual dog. We got him from a rescue group, after he had been kicked around a school yard by a bunch of kids. He thought the world of me. He took longer to train. Years later, he bit me, after biting one other person. Had to put him down

    7. agilitymach profile image98
      agilitymachposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm so sorry Larry about having to put your dog down.  How difficult.  Kudos to you for giving him a good home while you could.

    8. GiblinGirl profile image82
      GiblinGirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Larry - so sorry about your dog.

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