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Need Help With A Jack Russell Delinquent

  1. VintageTidbits profile image60
    VintageTidbitsposted 7 years ago

    I adopted a Jack Russell terrier from the Humane Society 2 1/2 years ago.  She is about 4 years old and spayed.  She was been a sweetheart until we moved 8 months ago.  She is still very friendly with all people but she now challenges every dog she sees. 

    We have moved to a high rise apartment building and there are many dogs here.  I never know what to expect when the elevator doors open.  Today she challenged a pit bull which wanted to fight back. I held my breath until the elevator doors closed. I thought that she would have calmed down by now --- it has been 8 months.  Any suggestions?

    1. profile image0
      Pani Midnyte Odinposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Well, normally I would suggest having the owner of the other dog rub a blanket all over their dog and giving it to your dog to get used to the scent of the other dog with. However, being around so many dogs could be a problem when it comes to a project like this.

      Of course, your dog is confused about just where exactly her territory now lies. Has she been around many other dogs before? Have you tried giving your apartment a thorough cleaning so that any trace of another dog has been removed completely? This will give your dog a fresh start and give her an opportunity to claim her territory in the building.

      Otherwise, arranging "play dates" with the other dogs may be a good suggestion, or if there is a community dog park nearby. This would give her a chance to get to know the other dogs in a controlled setting.

      Sorry I can't help more. It's been years since I've owned a dog of my own, but I know many friends who have used the suggestions above and it has worked wonders with their dogs. Good luck smile

  2. rocknrodeogirl profile image73
    rocknrodeogirlposted 7 years ago

    My brother and sister in law gave me my Jack Russell after they moved. They had two females that got along fine before the move, but afterwards they fought like crazy. I think they are extremely territorial (especially the females) and when they move it is all new territory to fight for.

    I also have a friend who's had two Jack Russell's since they were puppies. They've always had a tendency to fight with each other often, and now she's got a baby so she is getting rid of one of the dogs.

    They seem to be more territorial then other dogs, especially the females. I like the idea of playdates, find non-threatening dogs in a neutral situation. I also wonder if when she misbehaves if you are getting "nervous" about the situation and she's misreading it as you're scared and she's trying to be protective of you? It's something to think about.

    Good luck!

    1. profile image44
      ayishaposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Well, normally I would suggest having the owner of the other dog rub a blanket all over their dog and giving it to your dog to get used to the scent of the other dog with. However, being around so many dogs could be a problem when it comes to a project like this.

      Of course, your dog is confused about just where exactly her territory now lies. Has she been around many other dogs before? Have you tried giving your apartment a thorough cleaning so that any trace of another dog has been removed completely? This will give your dog a fresh start and give her an opportunity to claim her territory in the building.

      Otherwise, arranging "play dates" with the other dogs may be a good suggestion, or if there is a community dog park nearby. This would give her a chance to get to know the other dogs in a controlled setting.

      Sorry I can't help more. It's been years since I've owned a dog of my own, but I know many friends who have used the suggestions above and it has worked wonders with their dogs. Good luck

  3. VintageTidbits profile image60
    VintageTidbitsposted 7 years ago

    Thank you for both replies. 

    I had previously tried taking her to a nearby dog park but she would not stop growling with her hair standing up.  I kept pushing on her back to make her sit but she would not listen.  She heels and sits perfectly when there are no other dogs.  I am beginning to wonder if this is the reason she was taken to the Humane Society. 

    A friend just suggested buying a muzzle to see if that stops her behavior.  She said that a dog will not challenge if it knows that it cannot bite.

  4. profile image0
    Kathryn LJposted 7 years ago

    I have two Jack Russells; a dog and a bitch.  They are very territorial and can become very agitated when they feel their space is being invaded.  The dog scent marks and the bitch picks a fight with every thing going.  You have to identify something that pushes their hunting button because this over-rides everything else and will make them focus on you rather than other dogs.  In the case of my two, a 'jolly flyer' is the answer.  It is a soft rubber frisbi which is floppy and feels like a small dead animal when held in the mouth.  I only have to wave it in front of them and I have their undivided attention.  I can allow them off the lead in public places as long as we are playing with the flyers.  They even allow other dogs to play with them at catching the flyers.  You can buy them on the internet at prezies for pets.  It maybe that your bitch will identify another toy, its usually the only one she hasn't shredded.  Because they are bred for ratting, it can mean that they seem to behave badly.  Harness their instinct and they are brilliant.  Hope this is of some help.

    1. VintageTidbits profile image60
      VintageTidbitsposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, Kathryn. This info is really helpful.  I will carry a squeak toy with me on our walks.  She loves squeak toys.

      1. profile image44
        kpwriteposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        I used to have a Jack Russell Terrier but now I have a Retriever mix from a dog shelter. Like your dog, my dog started to challenge other dogs after we moved.  I also had trouble with his overly territorial behavior . Like you, we moved to a more built up area and because he wasn't used to seeing or hearing many other dogs, he became stressed. It took him a while to settle down, but eventually he did.

        I took him for daily walks on the same familiar route so he could mark his territory (which he still seems to overdo). I used the phrase "it's okay" and stroked his neck as we approached  a new dog and he became calmer. After a while, I only had to say the phrase for him to respond. Dogs, like humans can take a while to settle in to a new place and get used to all the strange new sounds and scents. Hope this helps. If you need any further  advice you can find me at <snipped link>

        1. VintageTidbits profile image60
          VintageTidbitsposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          I have been walking her to the same area every day.  Sometimes in nice weather we go for walks around the neighborhood.  She is just as aggressive when we are walking down the sidewalk two blocks from the apartment.  She barks at dogs that are in their own yard even when they do not bark at her.  I have to stop her challenging before someone complains to the landlord.

    2. LadySeren profile image67
      LadySerenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I have to agree with Kathryn.  I have a Jack Russell and a Staffie, the Jack Russell is very territorial.  Both dogs are 13 now, and while he has settled down with age he can be unpredictable around other dogs, usually squaring up to the largest dog he can find on "his" patch.

      The easiest way of preventing him going into "protect my patch" mode is to take his mini kong along and play.  Nothing distracts him then, no matter how many dogs are out walking!

      1. VintageTidbits profile image60
        VintageTidbitsposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        She does have a mini kong toy that I used to put liver treats inside of when I first adopted her and realized that she had been an outside dog and was startled by sounds that house pets ignore such as the dishwasher, the washing machine spin cycle, the blender and food processor, etc.    I had forgotten about the mini kong until I read you post.  Thanks.

        1. LadySeren profile image67
          LadySerenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          I have the mini kong in my bag when just walking.  His eyes don't leave me when he knows I have it, until we get to the field and play . 

          I think it's just down to finding a toy or signal/sign that keeps them focused on you and then the reward (playing or a fuss) at the end for good behaviour.

          Good luck!  Don't give up, there will be something that keeps her attention on you.

  5. profile image0
    china manposted 7 years ago

    Jack Russells are by nature one of the most stubborn dogs there are - goo dluck with yours.  I only dropped in because the scene from "As good as it gets" with Jack Nicholson keeps popping into my mind in relation to small difficult dogs!

 
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