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How to Make a Large Amount of Holiday Cards at the Same Time!

Updated on November 6, 2013

Making your own holiday cards.

Greeting cards have been around for centuries. In antiquity, messages of good will were printed on scrolls. As early as 1400s, paper cards were passed around in Europe.

In early 1800s, wealthy individuals started hiring artists to design holiday cards to pass around to friends.

In 1840, the first adhesive postage stamp became available in Britain.

In 1849, Esther Howland, a young woman from Massachusetts, started regularly publishing valentines in the United States.

By 1856, Louis Prang, a German immigrant, started a lithographic business near Boston, Massachusetts, and is credited with the start of the greeting card industry in America.

Hallmark was founded in 1910 in America, driven by the postcard craze of that time.

Today, the greeting card industry grosses multi-billions of dollars in revenue. A quick search on eBay and there are almost 70,000 listings for the words "greeting card".

With the founding of ETSY came an alternative venue for artists to sell their handmade cards at a fixed price and grow an inventory of their own designs.

And then came Facebook. People who normally did not involve their time on other selling sites, and strictly participated on social media, now had an additional outlet for selling their handmade greeting cards constructed at their kitchen tables.

A friend of mine who sold her cards exclusively at her place of employment took advantage of the opportunities of Facebook for selling her cards.

Despite the creation of e-cards, there never seems a shortage of buyers for greeting cards of any occasion.

Coming from a large family, I mastered an annual tradition of making just under 100 greeting cards every year for Christmas.

Here is the recipe for making your own greeting cards in large volume.

This shaped card was challenging as I had to cut the train and the window openings by hand.

This was one of the last Christmas cards I mailed in bulk, due to postage increases.
This was one of the last Christmas cards I mailed in bulk, due to postage increases. | Source

My great-grandmother was originally from England. She lived in Connecticut after she married and painted greeting cards for a company in Boston, Massachusetts, around the early 1920s-1930s.

The definition of handmade.

Commonly the definition of handmade means made by hand, not machine.

I attended a craft fair with friends one year in town and a customer browsed our greeting cards. She purchased a set of rubber-stamped cards that my friend had made by embossing an image on to the cards. The customer told us that she felt the cards were not handmade because the paper was store bought. In other words, that particular customer was under the impression that handmade meant the cardstock had to be made from scratch as well.

When I think of a handmade baby blanket, I don't think of someone gathering the wool from a lamb's coat before knitting the blanket. I think of a person buying a skein of Red Heart yarn or other brand of yarn and then knitting a blanket. To me, that still means handmade.

This is worth mentioning because if someone is to go start an account on eBay or ETSY to sell their greeting cards, it's important to list specific information such as the brand of cardstock used for the base of the card, instead of leaving the customer to assume the cards themselves were made from handmade paper.

Instructions for creating a large amount of greeting cards all at once.

Whether you want to sell greeting cards or make them for friends, but need to do so in a large quantity, here is a checklist of items to help you along the way.

  1. Think about the design. Do you want to rubber stamp a design, draw a design, print a design out from the computer, or use die cut shapes for the design?
  2. Decide how many greeting cards you will need. Always make a few extra. Keep one for your own portfolio. Start with the number of card you will need and get the card base ready. For the train cards shown above, I had to cut out 75 trains by hand, including the window openings. This is before I had die cut machines. I printed out a template from a train shape and traced it.
  3. What supplies do you have on hand? See Table A below for some suggestions about what to have on hand depending on the design you would like to create.
  4. Plan ahead and watch for sales at craft stores. If you aren't already signed up, go to Joann Fabrics and sign up for their mailing list. You will get coupons and free shipping on in-store and on-line purchases. Watch the weekly paper for the Michael's craft store ads. Sometimes AC Moore has sale flyers with coupons in the Sunday paper. Check your local craft stores for sales on cardstock and other supplies. Hobby Lobby, eBay, ETSY, Overstock, Amazon, and Target all carry a wide variety of craft supplies. All discounts help. It's costly to make large quantities of greeting cards.
  5. Check your stash of glitters and glue to make sure you'll have enough for a large project. Order ahead if you think you'll run out during your project. You don't want to be caught without enough of the same red glitter glue for all cards. If you are ordering online, you'll need at least two weeks to make sure you get them in time to start your project.
  6. Decide if you want to use cardstock sheets that you trim yourself or pre-cut and folded card sets. Local craft stores such as Michael's and AC Moore sell cards and envelope sets. Sometimes they go on sale half price. Those are great to start a project with because they are efficient. However, if you have a paper trimmer, you can buy a whole ream of cardstock at Walmart for a few dollars and trim your own down to size. You can get two cards out of one piece of cardstock. You can also find a variety of colored cardstock at office supply stores such as Staples in large quantities.
  7. If you choose to cut your own cards from whole sheets of cardstock, don't forget the envelopes. Walmart and Staples sell greeting card envelopes, as well as stores online.
  8. I'm mentioning specific stores because you will need to know how to pick up supplies on a last minute's notice if you run out while working on your project. I order a lot of my supplies ahead of time online. It's convenient and I can usually get a better deal than going to the store at the last minute.
  9. Create a work space to start your project. Whether it be at the kitchen table or in your home craft room, clear off a table or desk to use exclusively for your project until its completion. The location of your project should be away from children and pets so you can work on your cards at your leisure.
  10. Anticipate that the cards will take you anywhere from a few days to a week or so to complete. Make a goal to create so many cards a day.

Table A ~ Supplies
Paper trimmer.
Adhesives such as double-sided tape, glue dots, and glue sticks.
Cardstock sheets or card and envelope sets.
Envelopes, if using cardstock sheets.
Decorative papers.
Ribbon.
Glitter or glitter glue.
Cotton balls or small pom poms.
Markers.
Rubber stamps and ink.
Die cut shapes or paper punches.

Step 1. Organize your work space.

Once you have supplies on hand, create your work space.

  • Keep the desk or table cleared of clutter.
  • Place glitters, adhesives, or other decorative elements aside in an organized container nearby.
  • Keep the cards in a stack away from the work space nearby in an accessible container such as a magazine holder or plastic file pocket. (This step is after you have trimmed up all of the cards if you chose to buy cardstock instead of pre-cut card sets.)
  • Place wax paper over your work surface to save the desk top.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Basket filled with adhesives.  Work space covered in wax paper.   Zippered plastic envelope stores pre-cut and folded cardstock cards and envelopes.I purchased a set of these wicker baskets at the Dollar Tree.  They came with liners.  Very handy, decorative and inexpensive.I keep pre-cut and folded cardstock card sets with envelopes in zippered plastic sleeves.  These card sets were purchased at Michael's Craft Store for around $10 for a set of 25 depending on size.I keep all of my work in progress on a baker's rack.  The baker's rack was used when I got it so it didn't come with trays.  They were too expensive to replace.  I purchased some half size aluminum trays at a discount store in town.  The set of silicone cupcake liners comes in handy when I'm working with multiple die cuts and embellishments.  I put all of my cut outs or gems in the cupcake liners while I work on my desk space.
Basket filled with adhesives.  Work space covered in wax paper.   Zippered plastic envelope stores pre-cut and folded cardstock cards and envelopes.
Basket filled with adhesives. Work space covered in wax paper. Zippered plastic envelope stores pre-cut and folded cardstock cards and envelopes. | Source
I purchased a set of these wicker baskets at the Dollar Tree.  They came with liners.  Very handy, decorative and inexpensive.
I purchased a set of these wicker baskets at the Dollar Tree. They came with liners. Very handy, decorative and inexpensive. | Source
I keep pre-cut and folded cardstock card sets with envelopes in zippered plastic sleeves.  These card sets were purchased at Michael's Craft Store for around $10 for a set of 25 depending on size.
I keep pre-cut and folded cardstock card sets with envelopes in zippered plastic sleeves. These card sets were purchased at Michael's Craft Store for around $10 for a set of 25 depending on size. | Source
I keep all of my work in progress on a baker's rack.  The baker's rack was used when I got it so it didn't come with trays.  They were too expensive to replace.  I purchased some half size aluminum trays at a discount store in town.
I keep all of my work in progress on a baker's rack. The baker's rack was used when I got it so it didn't come with trays. They were too expensive to replace. I purchased some half size aluminum trays at a discount store in town. | Source
The set of silicone cupcake liners comes in handy when I'm working with multiple die cuts and embellishments.  I put all of my cut outs or gems in the cupcake liners while I work on my desk space.
The set of silicone cupcake liners comes in handy when I'm working with multiple die cuts and embellishments. I put all of my cut outs or gems in the cupcake liners while I work on my desk space. | Source
I first sketch a draft of my work on a piece of paper to visualize what supplies I'll need and how to proceed efficiently with my design.
I first sketch a draft of my work on a piece of paper to visualize what supplies I'll need and how to proceed efficiently with my design. | Source

Step 2. Prepare the design.

Once you have a design in mind, you'll be able to create your cards using the techniques you chose. See Table B for ideas where to find inspiration for designs.

  • If you are rubber-stamping your design, have all of the pertinent inks or embossing tools available.
  • If you are using die-cut shapes and paper piecing, make sure to have all of your shapes cut before hand and set aside.
  • If you are printing your design from the computer, make sure to print and cut out all of the designs ahead of time.
  1. If you are rubber stamping, create your design for each card and set aside until you have all of your cards done. Color your designs after they are all complete. You may wish to use a heat emboss tool to dry the rubber stamp ink on each card before coloring, or the ink may run in to the color.
  2. If you are paper piecing, now is the time to start adhering all of the pieces together. Do this for each one and then attach to the cardstock base. Glitter or color your designs once all of the die cuts are adhered.
  3. If you are printing your designs, decide how you will attach the design to the card. If you are using ribbon, have all of your ribbon pre-cut.


Table B ~ Finding Inspiration.
Printed wrapping paper.
The Christmas section of any department store.
Magazines.
Craft stores.
Malls.
Memories of Christmas pasts.
Printed scrapbook papers.
There is no shortage of ideas. If you are having trouble finding inspiration, take a trip through a mall decorated for Christmas. Have a cup of hot cocoa while touring a neighborhood decorated with Christmas lights. Look through magazines.

Cards that contain pompoms or other decorative elements that are bulky, will cost more in postage.

Step 3. Completing your design.

Once you have all of the designs completed, and if you haven't done so, now is the time to adhere everything together with the card base. Any decorative glitter, cotton (for Santa's beard or snowmen), pompoms, ribbon, etc., will complete the card design.

Also note that if you are rubber stamping an inside sentiment, you can choose whether to do that before you decorate your cards or after.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
This is an example of a card printed from an image on the computer.  I rubber stamped the sides and embossed them with glittery embossing powder.  Do all of the initial work first such as cutting out shapes, die cuts, or rubber stamping.  It saves time during the assembling process.This design took several steps.  The base of the card was white cardstock.  The topper was silver cardstock embossed with a snowflake pattern.  I then layered a die cut phrase with a plastic snowflake to each card.
This is an example of a card printed from an image on the computer.  I rubber stamped the sides and embossed them with glittery embossing powder.
This is an example of a card printed from an image on the computer. I rubber stamped the sides and embossed them with glittery embossing powder. | Source
Do all of the initial work first such as cutting out shapes, die cuts, or rubber stamping.  It saves time during the assembling process.
Do all of the initial work first such as cutting out shapes, die cuts, or rubber stamping. It saves time during the assembling process. | Source
This design took several steps.  The base of the card was white cardstock.  The topper was silver cardstock embossed with a snowflake pattern.  I then layered a die cut phrase with a plastic snowflake to each card.
This design took several steps. The base of the card was white cardstock. The topper was silver cardstock embossed with a snowflake pattern. I then layered a die cut phrase with a plastic snowflake to each card. | Source

Do you make your own holiday cards?

See results

Step 4. Mailing your cards.

After all of your cards are assembled, decorated, and signed, now comes the fun part of addressing them all.

I recommend using labels for the return address as well as the recipient's address. They are a few dollars for a package of 50, or you can buy them in bulk online. This will save a lot of time at the end and is more efficient then addressing all of the cards by hand.

Avery labels size 1" x 25/8" work great in a regular printer.

Keep a Portfolio of your Work!
I created a portfolio of my work using a scrabpook album loaded with sheet protectors. Any drafts and one completed copy of my work stays in the portfolio to show potential customers.

These are older samples, before I started using die cut machines.

This greeting card was made from red cardstock.  I layered it with white cardstock.  The images were rubber stamped and embossed with heat.
This greeting card was made from red cardstock. I layered it with white cardstock. The images were rubber stamped and embossed with heat. | Source
This is the inside sentiment, also rubber stamped and embossed with heat.
This is the inside sentiment, also rubber stamped and embossed with heat. | Source

Conclusion.

I hope you've enjoyed this tutorial about creating your own handmade greeting cards in bulk.

And, if you have been hesitating on selling your handmade cards because you didn't know how to make enough, hopefully this article has helped with some organizing and other useful tips on how to maximize your efficiency.

I look forward to hearing about your adventures in card making. Please leave a comment below and share your tips and strategies for designing and creating your own cards!

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    • profile image

      mariewj 3 years ago

      Wonderful Christmas train card. I'm not surprised that was a bit fiddly to cut. I have a large amount of cardboard templates that I use for shaped cards so I can easily make them in bulk.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Marie! Thanks so much for sharing your input here. That is a great idea. I have a few die cut shapes the size of cards. But I don't have many. I often make my own. One time I went to a scrapbook store in town that was closing. The owner had a complete set of die cuts that were all card size. There were about 20 shapes. I wasn't familiar with the brand of machine, but I offered to purchase them all from her. She closed up and I never heard from her. I was so disappointed. But I just love making shaped cards. They are so much fun.

    • tobusiness profile image

      Jo Alexis-Hagues 3 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      I have thought about making and marketing greetings cards but I'm not what you'd call crafty. :) However this could be a cool way to market some of my poems. Thank you for this, definitely one to keep for reference. A very useful and informative hub. Voting up and sharing.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Tobusiness! Thank you so much for your kind and thoughtful comments. I surely hope it helps, and best wishes for your poetry success.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      How to Make a Large Amount of Holiday Cards at the Same Time! Awesome my friend and so well thought of. You always have such wonderful suggestions and for this of year sounds a way to go. Voted up, awesome, interesting, useful and beautiful.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      What a great time-saving craft. Excellent information, Brandi! I have to admit that we don't do holiday cards. That is something I stopped doing when I became a single parent decades ago and simply didn't have the money or energy to do this sort of thing. This, however, is a great idea. Well done my friend.

      bill

    • VirginiaLynne profile image

      Virginia Kearney 3 years ago from United States

      Home made cards are wonderful and I used to do 80 or more every year. Now I tend to do fewer because I focus on making a holiday letter and photos to send. Love the way you give detailed ideas on how to get going on this craft!

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      What a great recipe, not to mention card making heritage. Nothing compares to hand made greeting cards. Thanks for sharing your guide with others!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      You are definitely the Queen of Crafts. What a beautiful train card and helpful instructions for those who aspire to send out something original, homemade and beautiful. Great tips for mass production. You inspire the crafter in us all.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      Crafty, I have a friend who does greeting cards. She uses heavy bond paper that looks like old parchment paper, but heavier. She's an artist and hand draws each design. She's expanded her business to include gift bags and wrapping paper. I had lunch with her today. She said she never knows what design (she draws quirky animals) she's going to do until she starts drawing, then her fun animal materializes right before her eyes!

      I don't have the patience for crafts. I buy mine. Since I can't afford gifts for friends and family, I always make sure I send cards for birthdays and Christmas.

      You did a great job on this hub. Love the history and the step-by-step instructions you shared.

    • kidscrafts profile image

      kidscrafts 3 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

      What an inspirational hub, Crafty! I love that you talked about the history of greeting cards throughout time.

      I am quite impressed with the fact that you create about 100 cards for Christmas. When my husband and I moved to Canada, we were sending about that amount of cards to friends and family (not handmade) but it took us around two months (December and January) to write all those cards. We were answering questions about life in Canada, we talked about our kids, etc. After a few years, we decided it would be more productive to write one letter that we would send to everybody with a place to write a personal message. And in fact we write this letter in three languages (that takes time too). What we didn't realize is that in that way we have a kind of a book of our life in Canada; it's a nice souvenir for our children as well. Through those letters we can also see the evolution of technology.

      You must be quite organized to create those 100 cards for the holidays! I love the way your organized the information to make it easy for anybody who wants to create their own cards! I love your card of last year in the shape of a locomotive with your children in the little windows! Adorable! It will be a great souvenir for them too when they will be grown up :-)

      Thank you for sharing this great hub! Voted up, useful, beautiful, interesting and awesome!

    • epbooks profile image

      Elizabeth Parker 3 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

      This is awesome! I wish I had the talent that you do to create these. Wonderful hub!

    • wetnosedogs profile image

      wetnosedogs 3 years ago from Alabama

      You surely are talented and I appreciate the work you put into this. I love the Snowmen one.

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Watch out Hallmark, Crafty is on the scene! You are so creative and handmade Christmas cards are indeed special treasures to those who receive them, especially knowing all the love that one has put into making them extra special.

      Thank you for sharing all of your creative ideas!

      Up and more and sharing

      Hugs, Faith Reaper

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you for all the useful instructions and hints, Crafty. Making Christmas cards as you describe sounds likes a fun project!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi DDE! Thank you so much for your kind and thoughtful comments. It's so nice to see you.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Billy! I know exactly what you mean. At one time, I sent around 100 cards. But with the postage, that was adding up to almost $50. Then one year I added a pompom to a Santa design, and that came out to extra postage because of the thickness. So I stopped mailing so many after that. Thank you for stopping by and commenting.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Virginia! I used to love taking on the big projects. For me personally, that meant once a year at Christmas. Then people started asking me to do other things for them like invitations and thank you cards. It is a lot of fun, but certainly a lot of work. I like the idea of a holiday letter and photo! Thank you so much for commenting!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi RTalloni! Thanks so much for stopping by and commenting. It's so nice to see you!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Flourish! That train was a challenging card. My children were much younger then. LOL, I remember having to cut out all of the cards by hand because I didn't have a die cut machine yet. But I think it helped learning how to cut them out by hand at first, now my experience isn't limited to just die cut machines and it's easy to create shaped cards by hand. Thank you so much for your kind and thoughtful comments.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Brave! Thank you for stopping by and sharing that wonderful story about your friend. My great-grandmother, I hear, also hand-drew all of her work. She designed cards for a company in Boston and painted them. I found that so fascinating! She passed away when I was around 3 or 4, so I didn't have a chance to share in her life, but I have a picture of her holding dolls that she created and sewed by hand. I love to hear stories about other artists. Your friend sounds like a gem!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Kidscrafts! Thank you so much for your lovely input.

      I love your idea about the letters and how you created a memory book from them. That's an incredible idea!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi EP! Thank you so much for commenting.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Wetnose, thanks so much for stopping by. That snowman one got so many laughs that year. I still remember someone writing back to me saying they couldn't wait to see what I came up with the next year! LOL

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Thank you so much Faith for your wonderful and kind comments. I hope you have a lovely day.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Alicia! Thanks so much for stopping by and commenting. I usually start making them after I've decorated the house and put on some Christmas music. It helps get in the mood to find holiday inspiration.

    • Kathryn Stratford profile image

      Kathryn 3 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

      What a fantastic article! I just buy cards right now, but the idea of making them appeals to me. I like how you have so many tips and suggestions for the preparation and project steps, and that you even mention where certain products can be bought. It's important, because nobody wants to search all over the place for different items!

      Thanks for sharing this with us, and have a great day.

      Voted up, sharing, and pinned.

      ~ Kathryn

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

      Hi I think this gem was created just for me ha ha !!Seriously though what a wonderful hub for me to vote up save and share. Take care and enjoy your day.

      Eddy.

    • Millionaire Tips profile image

      Shasta Matova 3 years ago from USA

      Great tips and ideas here. Beautiful cards! I think making Christmas cards in bulk would make it easier to get them sent out even if you only use them for personal use. I've made a few cards, but not in the volumes you are thinking of here. Voted up.

    • LKMore01 profile image

      LKMore01 3 years ago

      Clever, fun, innovative and original. Great creative ideas, Crafty.

    • midget38 profile image

      Michelle Liew 3 years ago from Singapore

      Wonderful....great ideas for Christmas! Reminds me that time just goes so fast!!

    • younghopes profile image

      Shadaan Alam 3 years ago from India

      lovely and these are some really creative ideas, sharing it

    • Jasmeetk profile image

      Jasmeet Kaur 3 years ago from India

      very interesting and creative ideas. Thanks for sharing. voted up!!

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 3 years ago from America

      Nice idea I love handmade Christmas cards. Years ago I made some but not anymore. I wanted to get quilts made for Christmas and that's not going to happen. Enjoyed your hub.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      I agree with your definition of handmade. Thank you for sharing your creativity Very helpful.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Kathryn! Thanks so much for commenting here and your input. Half the battle I find every year is having enough supplies on hand. It's frustrating to get everything set up and then realize I ran out of red glitter glue. LOL

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Eiddwen! Thanks so much for your lovely comments.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Millionaire Tips! Thanks so much for commenting. It used to be way more challenging when I didn't have a baker's rack. Now I can make all of the embellishments in one huge batch and set them aside to dry while I'm working on the cards at the same time.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi LKMore! So nice to see you. Thanks so much for commenting.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Midget38, thanks so much for stopping by and commenting! I can't believe I've been hearing Christmas music on the radio and in stores already! LOL

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Younghopes! Thank you so much for commenting and sharing. I really appreciate your input here.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Jasmeetk, thanks so much for stopping by! It's nice to see you. Thank you for input and sharing.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Moonlake, I have never made a quilt before but envy those who do. I still had mine from when I was a baby that my grandmother made for me, but a couple of years ago it finally disintegrated. LOL Thanks so much for stopping by and commenting!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi MsDora! Thanks so much for stopping by and your lovely comments. :D

    • WiccanSage profile image

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 3 years ago

      Great tips-- it usually takes me forever, and I never end up doing as many as I had hoped to do; I start with the 'most important' people in my life, and end up sending everyone else box cards instead because I inevitably run out of time. This sounds like it might actually help me get organized, I think I'm going to print it and pin it up on the door inside my craft cabinet. Thanks!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Wiccan! I know the feeling, I always keep a back-up supply just in case. Last year I became ill right before Christmas. I finished my cards just in time, but many got to their destination late. It would have definitely been easier to buy a box, but I'm stubborn like that. I had started them before falling ill, so I didn't want all of my work to be in vain.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 3 years ago

      If I had the time, I would attempt to make a few special cards for my family. I think they really send a sincere message when they are handcrafted. Great idea and thanks for the step by step instruction.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Teaches! Thanks so much for commenting. I've really scaled down in the past few years. At one time, I was sending out 75 handmade cards. It became really expensive. Now I sent out about 20, if that. I also have had trouble finding time to make all of the same. I like to mix it up and make a variety. :D

    • Suzanne Day profile image

      Suzanne Day 3 years ago from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

      Good idea! I also like the idea of being able to rubber stamp the inside and not write 100 times on the inside "Dear so and so, blah blah blah, Love me". Another idea which I plan to do this year is to design a pretty card on the computer using digital scrapbooking images and print it out 100 times!!!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Suzanne! Thanks for sharing your experience here. There are some very lovely digital creations. My favorite are vintage-looking gift tags. I just love the way they look, and it's almost impossible to tell they were printed digitally! :D

    • peachpurple profile image

      peachy 2 years ago from Home Sweet Home

      i don't own a cutting tool for my craft, I use scissors and penknife to cut them out. How much is the shipping cost do you add to your cost? How do you pack your greeting cards for shipment?

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