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More Triangles in Quilts: On-Point Sets

Updated on January 21, 2017
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Quilter, author, tutor, columnist, Jan T Urquhart Baillie has been enthusing others with her passion for quilting for more than 30 years.

On-Point Quilt Sets Made Simple

Setting a quilt on point is not as hard as is thought. To set blocks together on point, requires several setting triangles — the triangles which are needed at the edge to get the quilt to have straight sides.

The triangles along the borders in this detail are quarter-square triangles.

Enjoy the tutorial!

Psst! It's Really a Straight Set!

Setting blocks into an on point set is simple once you understand that it really starts out as a straight set.

The ends of each row have triangles attached, but you need to establish whether they are quarter- or half-square triangles

Singing the Blues - The centre uses this layout
Singing the Blues - The centre uses this layout

Setting Blocks into an on point set quilt

Psst! It's really a straight set!

Setting blocks into an on point set is simple once you understand that it really starts out as a straight set.

The ends of each row have triangles attached, but you need to establish whether they are quarter- or half-square triangles

Imaginary Squares

At the corners: invisible, but important!

Imaginary Squares

There or Not?

The ends of each row in an on point set have triangles attached, but you need to establish whether they are quarter- or half-square triangles.

To do this, you can use what I call an imaginary square at the sides of the quilt.

The pink lines in the diagrams are the sides of the imaginary squares and they allow you to calculate the size of the squares to cut for the setting triangles.

Half- or Quarter-?

What Kind Are They?

In the corner triangle above there are two straight grains at the edge of the quilt, so the triangles must be:

Half-Square Triangles

Refresh yourself about the rules for half-square triangles by reading this hub:

Quarter-Square Triangles

Two Needed For This Set

At the sides of this layout there are triangles which have only one straight grain at the side of the quilt so they must be: quarter-square triangles.

If you have not already looked at The rules for cutting these triangles hub (link above), refresh yourself by reading about these important rules.

In Our Set

What kind are these triangles?

Calculate the Size of the Triangles

That's a Snap!

The calculations are now the same as when you want to set a block on point. (Blocks on point)

  1. You need the diagonal measurement of the imaginary square at the corner for the four corner triangles.
  2. Cut two squares in the required size, according to the rule for half-square triangles, and then cut these in half diagonally to give four corner triangles.
  3. You need the diagonal measurement of the imaginary square at the side for the side triangles.
  4. Cut one square in the required size, according to the rule for quarter-square triangles, and cut the square with an X to give four side triangles. For this quilt, you will have two left over, but not always.

Like This:

Sew the Rows Together

To sew an on point set quilt together is sew simple.

Once you understand that it really starts out as a straight set, setting blocks into an on point set is simple .

First, you sew your rows together as always.

In our set, we need:

  • Row 1: One ¼ square Δ, two blocks
  • Row 2: Three blocks
  • Row 3: Two blocks, one ¼ square Δ

Sew the three rows together.

Now the top is ready to have the half-square corner triangles attached.




Turn the assembled quilt top (yellow area) one-quarter turn to the left, attach the corners, and...

Voila!

Tips To Make It Easy

Tips for attaching the corner triangles

To Attach the Triangles Exactly

In order to sew the triangles exactly where they should go:

  1. Fold the triangle in half, so that the points are together.
  2. Finger press a crease at the half-way point on the long (diagonal) side of the triangle.
  3. Fold the corner block in half and finger press a crease at the centre.
  4. Match these marks and pin, continue to pin together along the edge of the block.

Now your triangle is centred on the block.

This Set Uses? - It's Your Turn!

Answer by voting below - See what you know!

Which is the answer?

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And This Set? Guess

Your vote is? - You might get this one right too!

You say?

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The Detail at the Top is From This Quilt


Perhaps you can work out which type of triangles are used to set this one together?

Read more about this quilt...

Jan T will be happy to answer any queries you may have

© 2009 Jan T Urquhart Baillie

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      Jan T Urquhart Baillie 10 months ago from Australia

      If the blocks will be 12" finished size with sashing added individual blocks, then yes. However, if the sashing is added like a border, then you need to some calculating.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      please tell me do I count the sashing which I add to the measurement of the block? my blocks are 11"( not sew yet) and sashing is 2" for finishing size