Where is the SEC on these large companies...?

Jump to Last Post 1-1 of 1 discussions (16 posts)
  1. jackclee lm profile image84
    jackclee lmposted 6 weeks ago

    We have these large companies like GE and Amazon and Google...where they seem to be too big to fail...
    Why does our anti-monopoly laws not apply here?
    We allow these companies to grow and buy and merge with competitors...and then when they get too powerful or too big to manage...we wonder why they fail?
    The time to control these companies is before they get this big.
    GE just got hammered at the stock market due to their announcement or reducing the dividends to 0.01.
    Amazon stock just dropped by 25% over the past week...even though they are making and surpassing their revenue targets.
    Google has been exposed again for hiding the fact they lost user data to hacking...
    Where is our government over sight?

    1. wilderness profile image97
      wildernessposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

      Hard to call Amazon a monopoly when WalMart (aren't they the biggest company in the world?) is gaining ground on them every day.  Amazon has about 40% of online sales - that doesn't sound like a monopoly to me.  A big outfit, yes, but certainly not a monopoly.

      1. jackclee lm profile image84
        jackclee lmposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

        What is a monopoly?
        Amazon is the only one that conducts sales via the web and sells across the globe and offer free delivery if you are a prime customer...
        That is a monopoly of “business” model...
        They have no physical stores like walmart.
        They have no overhead.
        They have no inventory...
        They have no competition to speak of.
        It sounds lime a monopoly to me.

        1. wilderness profile image97
          wildernessposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

          ?? I buy online from Walmart, and would bet they sell across the globe (not that that has anything to do with being a monopoly).  They offer free deliver on some items, third party sales like Amazon does, plus (I think) free delivery on anything delivered to the nearest store rather than your doorstep.

          Can't see that having no stores makes them a monopoly.  But they do have some storefronts now anyway.
          They certainly DO have overhead, and inventory as well; Their warehouses are monstrous, and likely larger than any other company anywhere.
          They have more and more direct competition all the time.

          1. jackclee lm profile image84
            jackclee lmposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

            What you are missing is the bigger picture.
            It is not a monopoly in the old traditional sense.
            It is a monopoly in the manner that they drove many other business out of business. Like Sears and kmart and Sports Authoriy and Toy R Us and many other big box stores.
            These stores use to provide competition to consumers.
            Now, there is very little competition.
            That to me is the definition of a monopoly.

            1. wilderness profile image97
              wildernessposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

              I don't know that it was Amazon so much as it was online sames without showrooms - a business model, then, rather than a company.

              Yes, Amazon is certainly the largest one, but there are thousands of small ones selling on eBay, too.  And others as well: Does overstock.com have a showroom?  Wayfair?  Not sure, but don't think either one does.  I see plenty of competition with that basic business model and of course WalMart is only one of many big box stores that are going online as well - looking to occupy both worlds out of one warehouse I suppose.

    2. promisem profile image96
      promisemposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

      This is hardly a conservative view. It's actually quite socialist.

      Free markets allow companies to grow as large as they want without government interference.

      1. jackclee lm profile image84
        jackclee lmposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

        Sorry but you are wrong. Conservative believe in free enterprise to prosperity but with constraints. Anti monopoly being one of them.
        We also believe in a level playing field. Crony capitalism gives us a bad name. We cannot have large corporations with highly paid lobbyist and lawyers getting special priviledges while the small business suffer from overly burdening taxes.

        1. promisem profile image96
          promisemposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

          Free enterprise has no restraints. That's why it's free. Government interference is socialism.

          That makes you a socialist.  wink

          1. jackclee lm profile image84
            jackclee lmposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

            You are distorting the free enterprise system. There is a whole range and spectrum from all free, libertarian believes to the government controlled and runned business of socialism and communism.
            “Free does not mean all rules out the window”.  Just like there are limits to free speech. Don’t you agree?

            1. promisem profile image96
              promisemposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

              Not at all. My position is perfectly conservative.

              You distort the free enterprise system by arbitrarily deciding you want goverment to prevent companies from growing beyond a certain size.

              1. jackclee lm profile image84
                jackclee lmposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

                What do you mean arbitrary?
                It is a matter of government regulations that have been in place since the great depression.
                You tend to distort conservative positions and then attack it.
                You have no good understanding of conservatives and what we stand for.
                You just assume you know what it is.
                And we all know what happened when you assume...
                You make and ASS of U and ME.

                1. promisem profile image96
                  promisemposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

                  Are they the same government regulations that Trump has been killing by the thousands for the sake of free enterprise?

                  I only attack fake conservative beliefs, not true ones.

                  1. jackclee lm profile image84
                    jackclee lmposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

                    The regulations Trump elliminated had nothing to do with reducing monopoly or keeping business honest and level playing field. In fact, they were over burdening to the point business were cutting back and inhibiting new business creation.
                    The same goes with the insane regulation on CO2 emmissions...which the EPA imposed to kill the coal industry.
                    The problems is you and other socialist democrats has never rejected any tax hikes and any regulations that inhibit growth.
                    That was why our economy was in such a poor state under Obama.
                    Trump is doing it right and the economy is booming, with GDP above 4% which Obama said it could never happened. We were to live with a 2% growth rate indefinitely. He was proven wrong.

                    The tax and spend policy of Obama is what was wrong with out economy, not the free enterprise system.

                    In fact, those same bureaucrats still in office are trying to undermine the Trump reforms...
                    They still think we should tax more and spend more...and increase size of government...
                    to what end?
                    You can fill in the blank.

                  2. jackclee lm profile image84
                    jackclee lmposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

                    You would learn more by reading book by Milton Friedman “Free to Choose”...

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)