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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (20 posts)

Commas

  1. donnatru profile image77
    donnatruposted 7 years ago

    After using a comma in a basic sentence is there a space after the comma? I'm not sure if to use comma, space or just comma,then continue writting?

    1. Pandoras Box profile image66
      Pandoras Boxposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Comma then a space, yes.

  2. profile image0
    Website Examinerposted 7 years ago

    Indeed, Pandoras Box is correct: There must be a space after commas and other punctuation marks. No space before, as surprisingly many people seem to believe.

  3. Dame Scribe profile image59
    Dame Scribeposted 7 years ago

    I try to keep a space after a comma since it looks funny if none was there tongue lol

  4. WoodsmensPost profile image71
    WoodsmensPostposted 7 years ago

    Funny I was just thinking of the same question today. Thanks I usually put the space after a comma but wasn't really sure if this was the correct way to do it. My latest hub I had a mixture. But I think I'll go back to putting the space. It does look better and sometimes that is what counts the most.

    What about after the period?  I use a space is this correct too?
    Oh I think Website Examiner said yes after punctuations.

  5. Dame Scribe profile image59
    Dame Scribeposted 7 years ago

    I heard it use to be recommended that 2 spaces be in place after a period but now its ok to have one. hmm I prefer the 2 spaces tho since the computer auto-capitalizes the next letter lol

    1. profile image0
      Website Examinerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I have seen two spaces after period, too, and I'm quite sure that is still acceptable since many transcription firms use that method.

      One possible exception to the requirement for spaces after punctuation marks would be dashes: I have seen many professionals omit them ("-like this-"). I always insert them ("- like this -"), since I find it makes the text easier to read.

  6. Dame Scribe profile image59
    Dame Scribeposted 7 years ago

    I agree with you on that WE smile make the text easy on the eyes. Presentation is part of the writing process too not just cooking tongue wink

  7. lrohner profile image82
    lrohnerposted 7 years ago

    Two spaces after a period went the way of the typewriter for the most part. As for hyphens, they shouldn't be used unless you have a compound word or adjective, such as "fresh-baked cookies." Of course, you don't use the hyphen if the initial adjective ends in "ly," as in "freshly baked cookies." But I digress...

    What you're talking about, WE, is an em dash. If whatever program you're using doesn't support an em dash -- and many of them don't -- you should use two hyphens together preceded and followed by a space.

    1. profile image0
      Website Examinerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Such a powerhouse of knowledge! Very interesting.

      Dame Scribe, maybe you could educate us on the use of spaces before and after smileys.

      1. lrohner profile image82
        lrohnerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        One of my closest friends was a magazine editor for years and a twice-published author. It's amazing the grammar trivia you learn when you have a friend like that... smile

      2. Dame Scribe profile image59
        Dame Scribeposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        I include a space after smileys just to ensure the smiley works tongue lol

    2. Pandoras Box profile image66
      Pandoras Boxposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      That one has always been a mystery to me, and I've gone back and forth on it. Two dashes and a space, huh? That does look nice. Never considered using two dashes. It was always -for me, that is- a question of whether to space after the initial dash. I generally don't -as these examples show.

      So what I should be doing -- you're saying -- is using double dashes followed by a space. Huh.

      It certainly does bring more attention to it.

      1. lrohner profile image82
        lrohnerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Absolutely. An em dash is simply a dash the same width as two hyphens. If your program doesn't have an em dash, you just use two hyphens. A lot of programs, like MS Word, will automatically convert two hyphens to an em dash.

    3. Shadesbreath profile image85
      Shadesbreathposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      A parenthetical using an em dash (where the word processor doesn't convert them for you) is two hyphens with no space (My dog--I detest this beast--has fleas).  You can use an en dash in the same parenthetical role WITH spaces (My dog - I detest this beast - has fleas), but you'll find lots of people who will argue with you on that point anyway.

      1. lrohner profile image82
        lrohnerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        I wonder if there's something specific to online writing, Shades. I know in the online community, we are always directed to use two hyphens with spaces.

        1. Shadesbreath profile image85
          Shadesbreathposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          Two hyphens was originally intended for typesetters/editors to know where to place the em-dash. The em-dash was really just a dash that was as wide as the sans serif letter M. I have never heard of putting spaces in front of them anywhere credible, but the en-dash does get spaces in every instance, both standard usages and when filling in as an em-dash.

          In the end, it probably doesn't matter, since only the most ridiculous of editors would harp on that sort of thing if a text were good. So, I doubt anyone need worry too much, space or no space.

          1. lrohner profile image82
            lrohnerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            I think I was talking more about search engine-wise, Shades. You know, the old difference between "one two," "one-two" and "one_two," and how the search engines see the words. I would bet (although not positive) that's why most online publishers want the spaces.

            1. Shadesbreath profile image85
              Shadesbreathposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              Interesting. I'd love to read the conversations around that. Be interesting to see who is becoming or trying to become the Online challenger to old-school MLA and Chicago Manual etc.  I remember when Microsoft announced it was no longer going to capitalize the I in Internet, how people were like, "Oh, oh, MLA gonna get 'em!" (As if). Same with the two spaces thing you mentioned after periods, the style guides were slow.  You got any good style guide or online publishing juggernaut pages you can recommend?

  8. Pandoras Box profile image66
    Pandoras Boxposted 7 years ago

    I personally am dreadfully ashamed of myself for being so intrigued.

 
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