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Fast and Easy Science Fair Projects: Water Shooter

Updated on December 30, 2019
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WaterSqueeze bottleRuler
Water
Water
Squeeze bottle
Squeeze bottle
Ruler
Ruler

Compressing a fluid

Purpose: Let's learn about "hydraulics."

Overview: Hydraulics, from the Greek word meaning "about water." is the study of liquid in motion. A part of hydraulics deals with compressing a liquid, used in machines where great pushing of lifting strength is needed. A force pushing on any part of an enclosed liquid creates and equal pressure per unit of area on everything the liquid touches. By using a system of pistons (cylindrical containers filled with a liquid), great force can be achieved.

Hypothesis: When water is compressed and forced to flow out if an opening, the velocity of the water will be much greater if the opening is small than if it is large.

You need:

  • Squeeze bottle with spout top
  • A piece of heavy board
  • Water
  • Ruler

Procedure: Outside, remove the spout and fill the squeeze bottle with water. Set the board on its side and tilt the container against it. Let water leak out until it stops; the angle will keep most of the water inside. Then with your hand, strike the side of the bottle, forcing water out through the opening. Watch how far the stream of water shoots.

     Again, fill the squeeze bottle with water, set it against the board and let the water leak out. This time, screw on the spout. Keeping the volume of water Constant (by tilting) as well as the striking force used on the bottle, our Variable will be the diameter of the opening through which the water escapes. The spout makes the opening much smaller. Strike the side of the container again, using the same amount of force as before. Does the stream of water travel farther with the spout on? Does that mean the velocity of the water coming out was greater?

Results and Conclusion: Write down the results of your experiment. Come to a conclusion as to whether or not your hypothesis was correct.

Something more: Compare the amount of water coming out of the bottle with the spout off and with it on. Use a measuring cup to quantify  the volume of water in the bottle before and after each strike. Perhaps, with the spout on, less water is coming out? Did you strike the bottle with the same force each time? Can you find a way to be sure?

     Thanks for reading this one! Hope you liked it!    This is my 39th hub on Fast and Fair Science Fair Projects. This one is extremely easy, useful and fun! I'm sure most of you all out there, enjoyed reading and trying out this one, especially kids!    If you want more on Fast and Easy Science Fair Projects, you can try my other Hubs on the same topic.    Here are five of my Latest Hubs on Fast and Easy Science Fair Projects for you:

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    • profile image

      chakira emmanuel 

      7 years ago

      thankssss

    • profile image

      Izzie 

      9 years ago

      Wow love it

    • ChilliWilly profile image

      ChilliWilly 

      10 years ago from Kaunas, Lithuania

      This is very interesting and informative hub. Thanks for sharing!

    • Ultimate Hubber profile image

      Ultimate Hubber 

      10 years ago

      I can make my own water gun now. :)

    • cloudy_cool profile image

      TheCraftyPens 

      10 years ago from London, UK

      Wow...this one is easy! I have to try this project at home for my 3yo. She may not be old enough to understand it from a scientific view, but may atleast find it fun.

      Just one question; is it necessary to have the board here or just tilting the bottle against the wall might do? Has this project anything to do with the opposite pressure from the board when it shakes maybe? Coz a board would move a bit when you hit the bottle, wouldn't it?

    • Don Ship profile imageAUTHOR

      Don Ship 

      10 years ago

      Thanks a bunch, Docmo! I sincerely hope they do!

    • Docmo profile image

      Mohan Kumar 

      10 years ago from UK

      Nicely done- science should be fun. Your tips to teach principles will be loved by kids and they'll learn a lot by practical experiments.

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