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Racism is Alive and Well

Updated on November 5, 2012

I don't like racists - not white ones, black ones, green ones (money), or any other color. Racism fought with racism begets yet more racism. I'll not cast my vote for any person in any election who chooses to use the simplified definition of 'helping a people' - it's racism at its core and should be called such. No black candidate-elect would succeed in an election on a campaign aimed at helping 'black' people. No white candidate-elect would succeed in an election on a campaign aimed at helping 'white' people. Until the powers that be come to their senses and realize that we are ALL Americans, no matter our race or station in life, and that what is good for one must also be good for all, the election process in this country will remain in turmoil. Racism, called by many names, is the culprit, and it must be ignored, shunned, dissuaded, abolished on every level of governing, on every level of 'living'.

The next time you see a black woman using food stamps at Walmart, or a drunk Native American, or a Mexican walking along a highway, before you judge - as we have all been so conditioned to do - take a moment to realize that that person is your EQUAL, your counterpart, your reflection.

Christ said that how we treat the least among us is how we can expect to be treated as our heavenly reward. He also said to love one another as we love ourselves. He didn't say there were exceptions or categories in which to love, he said simply to love. DO your part to abolish racism. The next time one of your friends or family members uses the N word, or refers to a person of another race as being less than he or she is, kindly remind them that they are merely a reflection. Help and love others, lest you be left with only your racist thoughts in a cloud of dust. People can change, and if racist, by all means they should. This is 2012. There is no place in our world for bigotry and hate.

People worry about what evil will be the downfall of our nation, but that's an easy question to answer. It won't be an attack by Iran, it won't be the collapse of the economy, it won't matter who sits in the White House. Ultimately what will do us in as a nation is the notion that we can live hate-filled, spiteful, lives secluded from compromise and compassion. We are either part of the solution or part of the problem. We cannot be both.

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  • jcressler profile image

    James E Cressler 4 years ago from Orlando, Florida

    Thats a great way to look at the racial problem in America. One of my favorite Army Commanders, an African American names Harry Brooks, that I served with while in Korea back in the 1970's used to say, "I don't see black or white, I see green, Army green." It was and still is a great statement.

  • Twyla Dorzweiler profile image
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    Twyla Dorzweiler 4 years ago

    I agree Jim. It is difficult, and I imagine that anyone who has those feelings will not find elevating someone who has caused them pain through bigotry to their equal, an easy task emotionally. I've had similar experiences, as you might imagine. Growing up as the one and only person of color for 100 square miles was not void of contempt, hatred, or name calling. I have, however, found that when I approach a person - bigot or not - as a PERSON and not a ______ person, I'm greeted with a completely different attitude than when I present myself as better or as less. So many lessons we all need to learn, aren't there? Thank you for your thoughtful comments! I treasure you!

  • jcressler profile image

    James E Cressler 4 years ago from Orlando, Florida

    You are so talented and drive a hard point on bigotry. It's a two edged sword that cuts both ways. I have felt the sting of reverse or black on white racism before. Back in the 1970's, Army basic training was a literal powder keg with race fights going on everyother night. There's no good reason to hate your brother for the shade of their skin, but after suffering harm done because of your race, it's hard not to.

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