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Random Ramblings: Evolution, and Remembering What We Are

Updated on January 4, 2016
We are becoming aware of what we are, and it's not physical.  Every living cell is filled with energy.
We are becoming aware of what we are, and it's not physical. Every living cell is filled with energy. | Source

Can a Cell in Our Toe See Us as a Person?

We need to remember what we are. We are energy.

This energy has managed to manipulate dust, rock, and other physical objects, pulling and pushing with the forces of energy alone. Over eons, this pulling and pushing transformed the universe into what it is today. This energy built the universe without tools and without having a physical form of it's own. The universe is what it is, just through the manipulation of the forces of energy.

Then, the energy finally managed to find a way to become physical. By inhabiting an organic body, the energy is capable of manipulating the physical world in ways that energy alone cannot. That energy inhabits our bodies and the bodies of all life. We are that energy.

We also need to remember that, before we became physical, the energy was doing a pretty good job of creating on it's own, even if it did take it eons to reach this point. It was, and still is, capable of effecting the matter around it; just in a much slower manner. That would mean this energy has a purpose. This energy is sentient.

Energy can do a fine job of creating and ordering things all on it's own.  But the fine tuning needs fingers - and tools.
Energy can do a fine job of creating and ordering things all on it's own. But the fine tuning needs fingers - and tools. | Source

From drawing pictures on cave walls to drawing graffiti on the surface of Mars, life has advanced in what must seem to be a blink of an eye, compared to the time it took to create the universe (and everything in it).

But we are in such a hurry. Perhaps we are trying to advance too fast, if we judge by what we choose to draw when we reach the surface of another planet. We need to take the time to ponder the things we plan to do - to think about the consequences and keep careful track of the results, and keep a history of it. A single person can be born into this world and learn lots of valuable information; whether they live out their lives as a drug addict, a school teacher, or a scientist. Whether they live in tribal hut or a high rise sky scraper. Whether they are born whole or disabled. All of the information we gather teaches us more about how to manipulate the physical and resolve the issues we face.

Issues like genetic illness, drug addiction, and balancing technology with the nature. Our world is truly a miracle of careful design that we should not discard with impunity. Truly, we are intelligent beings that can do amazing things, but we are still made of the same energy that has practiced creating for eons. Becoming physical gives us ego, and we forget what it is we are. We need to remember, and then we need to remind ourselves every time we open our eyes as a new life.

It's as easy to believe as the rain.

What is so hard to believe?  The energy returns to the source, then returns to inhabit a new form - as simple and natural a process as rain.
What is so hard to believe? The energy returns to the source, then returns to inhabit a new form - as simple and natural a process as rain. | Source

Is being reborn really so hard a thing to believe in? I guess it would be, because of ego. You would have to lose your identity and start over, every single time. You would lose all the precious memories of every lifetime. What value did that life have if you only lose all the memories of it in the end? Why did you struggle and suffer through all that, and realize so many life changing things, only to lose it all in the end?

I think the blunt answer is; because it isn't all about you. It's about everyone, and everything.

It's so much nicer to believe that when we die, we remain the same person for eternity. We retain our identity and our memories, and the things we did in life are weighed on a scale that will decide whether we deserve Heaven or Hell. It gives us motivation to struggle to be "good". Good people will be repaid, and bad people will pay for their mistakes for eternity.

Is even 120 years enough time to determine your fate for all of eternity? Eternity is a long, long time.
Is even 120 years enough time to determine your fate for all of eternity? Eternity is a long, long time. | Source

But living so short a time span doesn't seem to be enough (to me) to determine our fate for the rest of eternity. Doesn't it make more sense that we are an energy that animates the physical for a time, then returns to the main body of energy for a time, and then animates the physical again, for a time? That we work to manipulate matter to benefit this energy; to improve the physical world so that our next physical manifestation will be improved?

That the things we experienced and the identities we had have not truly been lost, but molded into our evolution? How could this information possibly be transferred?

If we are energy, then energy never dies; it changes. So, when we die, the energy we are leaves the body behind. Death is something we are horrified by, and we fight tooth and nail not to do it. Some would rather be sustained on life support rather than be allowed to be freed from a body that no longer works. Yet, death is inevitable. Everybody does it. How can something we all have to do be so very bad? Perhaps it has a purpose; of letting the energy continue to do it's work in a fresh new physical form.

Here is another way of looking at it. The electricity to a computer is turned off, and the computer is dead. The computer is replaced with a new one; you plug it in. It comes alive, fed on exactly the same energy the previous computer was. But does it have the same memories the previous one had? No. It's a new machine.
So, when we die, we leave our body behind, which includes our hard drive, filled with all the memories we've accumulated over this life span.

But now, here's the kicker part, the really fascinating part, the sentient portion of this theory, to me. When you bring the new computer home and plug it in, does it just sit there and do nothing? It shouldn't do anything at all, should it? It's brand new; there is nothing on it, right?

But no; the computer starts up, and loads it's operating system, it's ROM. It's Read Only Memory.

This is the program it was manufactured with. That program allows you to put new programs on it. It allows the computer to "learn" and become as individual as it's user.

So when we are born, do we just sit there and do nothing? No. Our hearts beat, we breathe, all of our systems are working. We start up, and load our ROM. And we learn from there.

Are we just organic computers?

Can it really be that when we die, we leave all we learned behind?  Like turning off a computer hard drive?  Or do we retain information to pass on?
Can it really be that when we die, we leave all we learned behind? Like turning off a computer hard drive? Or do we retain information to pass on? | Source
Where, and how, do we evolve from here?
Where, and how, do we evolve from here?

Fascinating, isn't it? Two cells; egg and sperm. They obviously have all the necessary files; they have ROM. These files are put into play by the energy that animates the cells, and the cells develop into the organism the blue print indicates. The organic systems within the baby know how to function, the brain that develops already has a basic operating system in place before that new entity is ever born; and the energy stores what it learns from there.

(Some folks think there is a separate entity even from that. There is the computer, the energy source, and then the user of the computer. That would indicate a separate sentient energy is involved, a "soul". I personally feel we are all a part of one energy, but I don't know. Nobody knows.)

Our Standard Operating System, our ROM, is instinct. And as with everything else around us, we take it completely for granted and do not see how miraculous this aspect of ourselves is. How was this program written? How can you, as energy, remember anything? How can you pass on any valuable information, when the 'hard drive" you left behind is gone?

We can transfer files to the new computer from the old one. A new computer isn't made from the old computer you had, but a human is made from organic pieces; egg and sperm, which are pieces of the previous entity. Could some of the life experiences of the parents be passed on to daughter and son? Obviously, a great deal of information is passed on; hair and eye color, and the blue print of how to grow into a new complex organism is passed on in this manner. Why not other information as well?

Perhaps information is passed into the physical matter by the energy itself. Perhaps it retains a resonance of what it once was, and shapes a new life in somewhat the same pattern as a previous life. So, if Cleopatra's energy were to return to a new body, the new body may have vague memories of this past identity. Or, perhaps, the energy, once leaving the body, returns to the main for a time, and blends back into it, whereby a new, blended portion of the energy creates a new life. So the new life has vague memories of Cleopatra, of a tailor, of a black bear, of a tree, perhaps. When the new life opens it's eyes, it finds, as it grows, it is more interested in forests than most people, has a passion for sewing, and yearns to see the pyramids of Egypt.

Our energy is different. We don't plug in.

Perhaps this picture portrays us better; the computer is our physical body, the person running the computer is the soul.  When the person gets up and walks away, some of the information that is in the computer walks away as well.
Perhaps this picture portrays us better; the computer is our physical body, the person running the computer is the soul. When the person gets up and walks away, some of the information that is in the computer walks away as well. | Source

We've all seen and experienced things that makes us think at least once in our lifetime - have I lived before?

Of course not. That's ridiculous. Impossible! And yet, why do we feel that way? Look down at your own hands, now. Wiggle your fingers, now. You are here now, alive now. Reading with your own eyes. You exist; isn't that just as amazing and impossible as being alive again? When when you look at it from this perspective, it doesn't seem ridiculous or impossible at all, but a very simple, natural cycle.

This also makes sense when you think about evolution. When we evolve, we change to suit the environment around us. Fish evolved gills and fins, birds developed wings and feathers, and even more very specific adaptations formed over time. For instance, for every type of flower that is pollinated by moths, and these flowers vary greatly in shape and length, there is a moth that has evolved a tongue long enough to reach it's nectar. This is a very specific variation. It doesn't make sense that it just randomly happens.

Some people think we just are; that there is no God, no energy, no life force, and that, if there is an energy, it is like electricity, and flows mindlessly - it certainly isn't sentient.

If our energy were simple electricity, I would think we would be more like a plugged in machine. But then, where did the machine come from? How did it get an operating system? What causes the electricity to move and function with a purpose?

If it is truly only electricity animating life, wouldn't cells just reproduce in a great gelatinous mass of tissue? No plan? A single celled organism is simple enough; it lives, it eats, it reproduces. But even eating and reproducing requires some kind of motivation.

If life were random, passive, a fluke, why did life feel the need to evolve into more than that? Why would it feel the need to evolve into more than that? Life could continue on this earth just as easily as nothing more than a single celled amoeba. If all of this happened just by chance, why did it feel the need to change and grow into more? How did it become more complex, and learn to organize itself into systems and nerves and organs?

Why evolve when life is good as it is?

Yeah, man!  This is the life.  Forever, and ever, and ever...
Yeah, man! This is the life. Forever, and ever, and ever... | Source

Inanimate matter doesn't feel the need to change and grow. The inanimate materials in the universe have existed in the same form for.... I haven't a clue, after all, rocks HAD to be created at some point. Right? They haven't been floating around in space forever - they came from somewhere. Were they created? Everyone is going on now, about the Bosun Higgs. Could it me, that the sentient energy, in it's need to create and become something more, pulled all these particles together into a great mass of matter? Would these particles have pulled into a mass of matter by simple random chance? Can matter be manipulated without an energy to move it?

And so you've got your Big Bang theory, which some people believe proves there is no God. Maybe the universe is nothing more than a big random mass of energy and matter. Maybe it's nothing but a great big amoeba. Maybe it's doing absolutely nothing but living, eating, dying, reproducing and re-birthing. The universe shrinks.... it expands. It shrinks.... it expands. Maybe that's all there is to it.Then again, maybe it's BREATHING. Maybe, the Universe is a lung; a complex organ that was shaped with intelligent design, filled with life energy, and so expands and contracts.

The truth is, nobody knows. We can theorize, but we don't really know WHY we are, and infuriatingly, the physical bodies we have come with the instinct for the organism to grow and survive, but not remember what it was before it ever existed. So we take what we learn in the span of our lives and apply it to eons we really know nothing about. Then we pass these things we've concluded down through the generations, from parent to child. And what we don't know, we just make up.

Because the truth is, no matter what your religion or beliefs are, in all honesty, you don't KNOW. That is what faith is for - you have to simply trust in the fact that you don't know. Only God knows.

And here we go again, because God doesn't really exist, we made "Him" up for comfort. Or, did we? WE DON'T KNOW. Even scientists have to admit; they don't know.

Is our awareness of the universe the same as a cell in our toe suddenly realizing it's attached to a whole body?
Is our awareness of the universe the same as a cell in our toe suddenly realizing it's attached to a whole body? | Source

This leads to more questions. To thinking about us. Why would some teeny tiny organisms, crawling on a teeny tiny ball of matter within this vast and huge expanse we call the universe - why would these infinitesimal little mites develop intelligence enough to figure out what the entire universe is made of? Couldn't this be compared to a tiny organism, inside a muscle cell in your big toe, figuring out what YOU are?

(Maybe this organism inside the cell of my big toe discovered this while I was laying the bathtub, thinking about the universe and everything in it.)

I think I have come full circle, although I'm not sure I've made my point. We need to remember what we are, and what our purpose is. We are the energy.

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      Tori 4 years ago

      Why not, though? Why not rebirth? Just curious. =)

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      Sarah 4 years ago

      After watching an episode of a well know doc series a short while ago I found myself thinking about this. Where does the energy go when we die?

      Of course reading this post I am now thinking of it again :) I haven't come up with an answer. The first law of thermodynamics tells us that it has to go somewhere and/or change form. As a scientist I believe this. Also I don't believe in rebirth. I do believe in the Big Bang Theory but not in any deity. So where does the energy go when we die? I'm still pondering this and part of me doesn't want to come up with a solution as I like to ponder this. I would like to know though. Minty xxx