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Roman soldiers re-enact the past

Updated on April 20, 2015

In their magnificent armor trappings, Roman army legionnaires reenacted some of the past as they went off to war held in one of the 10 Decapolis cities of the eastern part of the Roman Empire.

This was a special performance made at the South Theater in Jarash, Jordan, as part of an educational activity for school children designed to make them more aware of the historical importance of ancient theaters, the need for their preservation and their optimal use while the need to protect them.

Many school children came from Jarash and its surrounding areas as well as from Amman, Zerqa and Al Salt. It was a fun activity with pupils exhilarated and exalted as they watched different performances mostly acted by school youths.

Both the stage and the auditorium were beaming with delight and a heightened sense of action, as pupils cheered and interacted with the different acts on stage. Events stretched from blustering music to plays, break-dance and carol singing, bringing the whole house down in excitement.

The event was organized by the Ministry of Antiquities in Jordan, an activity that is part of one of its offshoot ATHENA Project for the enhancement of ancient theaters backed by the European Union under its Euromed Heritage Program.

More than 1500 children, families who saw it as a day outing watched the activity with a sense of thrill. The children were captivated by the Roman shown, as 45 legionnaires performed in the orchestra of the theater, doing moves and maneuvers made thousands of years ago, proving very educational for the children.

Many said it was a wonderful show, well conceived by local organizer Rahaf which provided the acts, and made sure the events went without a hitch. Madrasati, a local educational initiative contacted the public schools and made sure of a high turn out. Local teachers and pupils said the activity was highly entertaining combining what can be called as edutainment.

Experts argue if we are to preserve our ancient theaters right across the Euromed we have to target the youngest groups of society and make sure that they become more aware of the importance of ancient theaters.

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      Mahmoud 5 years ago

      I really enjoyed

    • profile image

      younis asmar 5 years ago

      Actually it was an entertainment , social and Educational event .

      And we had so much fun with the other volunteers and the kids inspite of the hot sun and the few negative comments the we heard from some childrens and adults .

      Personally i think that Archaeological sites wich i always go there is more fun and protect our culture .

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      Marwan Asmar 5 years ago from Amman, Jordan

      Thanks for comment Younis, yes it was, glad you enjoyed it.

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      younis asmar 5 years ago

      yes ! it was a great event and a great day !

    • marwan asmar profile image
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      Marwan Asmar 5 years ago from Amman, Jordan

      Thanks Helen and Hubert. Its really nice to get comments like this because it means that the right thing is being done.

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      Hubert Williams 5 years ago

      A great history lesson for children and adults

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      Helen Murphy Howell 5 years ago from Fife, Scotland

      What a wonderful way to bring history alive for children! Not only is it exciting for them to watch, but the important points of history would not be forgotten so readily!

      A very enjoyable hub!

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      Author

      Marwan Asmar 5 years ago from Amman, Jordan

      Yes it was a great effort to coordinate with schools to send their pupils to the auditorium on that day, but many did come and actually enjoyed themselves by interacting with the MC on the stage, who asked questions and provided bits and pieces of information about ancient times and the structure of the theater.

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      Jim Higgins 5 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      This sounds like a great educational effort, nice to hear about it. Up!