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A Study on the Relationships of Instructional Skills to Job Satisfaction

Updated on August 28, 2014

Introduction

The most important people in colleges and universities are not the presidents or deans, the students or staff – they are the members of the faculty (Holmes, 1974). The faculty is the essential ingredient in the control of the academic programs, and such programs are the basic reason for having colleges and universities. In addition to their role in conducting the educational operations of institutions of higher learning, faculty members are the people in closest and most continuous contact with students. They are the key people who meet with the students in classes, laboratories, seminars, and other learning institutions. Faculty members are the core of the college and universities: they are expected to remain in campus and give continuity to the institution over the years.

The functions of a faculty are broad and varied, but the common bond is that all of its members are concerned with higher education and most of its members are involved in teaching. A faculty member of whatever rank in college or universities has the responsibility to stimulate, direct guide and evaluate students. These are collectively termed as instructional skills: mastery of subject matter, organization of the lesson, class management, methods and techniques, promotion of desirable values and habitats, personality and grooming, communication skills and utilization of instructional materials.

Among the other major functions of the faculty members are research, extension and publication. In addition to these major functions, faculty members are nearly always involved in the collegial efforts of institution governance, student advisement or counseling, and professional advance and improvement.

METHODOLOGY

The subjects of this study were the College of Science Faculty members of the Polytechnic University of the Philippines for the school year 2005-2006. The data were gathered using the evaluation criterion used by the university. The questionnaire on job satisfaction was taken from Wanous and Lawler questionnaire.

The descriptive method of research was utilized and data were subjected to statistical treatments which included t-test, ANOVA and Pearson’s coefficient of correlation.

RESULTS

 
Frequency
Percentage
Male
22
30.56 69.44
Female
50
69.44
Total
72
 
. Profile of College of Science Faculty members by Selected Variables 1. Profile of College of Science Faculty members by Selected Variables Table I Gender Distribution
Age Bracket
Frequency
Percentage
20-29
5
6.94
30-39
11
15.28
40-49
29
40.28
50-59
21
29.17
60-above
6
8.33
Total
72
X = 46.17
Table II Age Distribution
Categories
Frequency
Percentage
Single
20
27.78
Mariied
50
69.44
Widower
2
2.78
Total
72
 
Table III Civil Status Distribution
Categories
Frequency
Percentage
Bachelor’s Degree Holder
5
6.94
Bachelor’s Degree Holder with masteral units
20
27.78
Master’s Degree Holder
30
41.67
Master’s Degree Holder with doctoral units
13
18.06
Doctoral Degree Holder
4
5.56
Total
72
 
Table IV Educational Qualifications Distribution
Bracket
Frequency
Percentage
1-5
15
20.83
6-10
13
18.06
11-15
14
19.44
16-20
15
20.83
21-above
15
20.83
Total
72
 
Table V Length of Services Distribution

DISCUSSIONS

Twenty two or 30.56% of the respondents were male and 50 or 69.44 were female. The mean age was 46.17 or forty six. Twenty or 27.78% were single, 50 or 69.44% were married and 2 or 2.78% were widowed. Five or 6.94% were bachelor’s degree holders. Twenty or 27.78% were with masteral units and 30 or 41.67% were with master’s degree. Thirteen or 18.06% were with doctoral units. Four or 5.56% were doctoral degree holders. The mean score of length of service is 12.92 or thirteen.

2. Instructional Skills Ratings of CS Faculty Members

2.1 Mastery of Subject Matter

“Relates the subject matter to other fields” and “Elaborates or analyzes subject matter, not dependent on textbook teaching alone” obtained the highest mean score of 4.65 described as very great extent. “Answers student’s inquiry intelligently” garnered the lowest mean score of 4.58 described a very great extent. The over-all mean score is 4.63 described a very great extent.

2.2 Organization of the Lesson

“Ask relevant questions of various levels” and “Organizes and presents subject matter clearly and coherently” received the highest mean score. “Explains the objective of the lesson carefully” got the lowest mean score of 4.42 described as great extent. The over-all mean score is 4.46 described as great extent.

2.3 Classroom Management

Receiving the highest mean scores among the skills mentioned was “Maintain proper discipline” and Explains the objective of the lesson carefully” with a mean score of 4.49. “Enhances student’s participation in classroom discussion obtained the lowest mean score of 4.40. The over-all mean score of 4.46 is described as great extent.

2.4 Methods and Techniques

"Provides varied learning experiences” obtained the highest mean score of 4.67. The lowest mean score of 4.49 described as great extent was rated to “Demonstrated awareness of current trends, researches and issues related to the subject matter of the course.” The over-all mean score of 4.55 is described as very great extent.

2.5 Promotion of Desirable Values and Habits

The highest mean score of 4.60 described as very great extent was rated to “Integrates desirable values.” The lowest mean score of 4.44 described as great extent was rated to “Shows sincerity and dedication to his work.” The over-all mean score of 4.54 is described as very great extent.

2.6 Personality and Grooming

“Exhibits sense of humor and applies it appropriately” obtained the highest mean score of 4.63. The lowest mean score of 4.44 described as great extent was given to “Is friendly and courteous to students and colleagues.” The over-all mean score is 4.50.

2.7 Communication Skills

“Expresses his ideas clearly” obtained the highest mean score of 4.79. The lowest mean score of 4.56 was obtained by the item “Has correct pronunciation and diction.” The over-all mean score is 4.67.

2.8 Instructional Materials

The two items “Utilizes varied instructional materials” and “Develops and uses well-varied instructional materials to facilitate teaching” garnered the same mean and over-all mean of 4.51.

2.9 Summary of Mean Scores in Instructional Skills

The faculty members attained the highest over-all mean score of 4.67 in terms of communication skills, followed by mastery of subject matter with 4.63, then by methods and techniques with an over-all mean score of 4.55, all of which were described as very great extent. Also, interpreted as very great extent were promotion of desirable values and habits, with a mean score of 4.54, instructional materials with a mean score of 4.51, and personality and grooming which obtained a mean score of 4.50. Organization of the lesson and classroom management had the same mean score of 4.46 described as great extent. The over-all mean score of CS Faculty members was 4.54 described as very great extent.

3. Job Satisfaction of CS Faculty Members

These were 22 dimensions asked in the questionnaire administered for faculty members. First in the rank was “Self-esteem or respect” with the mean score of 4.83 interpreted as fully satisfied while “Opportunity for growth and development obtained the lowest mean score of 4.42 described as substantially satisfied. The over-all mean score of job satisfaction among faculty members was 4.62 interpreted as fully satisfied.

4. Difference in Instructional Skills of Respondents When Compared Between and Among Each Other

Mean score in instructional skills were tested for significant difference. The computed F-value (1.50) of the summary of means of instructional skills of the respondents is less than the tabular values (2.01) which indicates that there is no significant difference in the instructional skill of the respondents when compared between and among each other.

5. Difference in the Instructional Skills of the Respondents when Grouped According to:

5.1 Age

The computed F value of 4.63 greater than the tabular value of 2.65; therefore, the null hypothesis was rejected. This indicates that there was a significant difference in instructional skills of respondents when grouped according to age.

5.2 Gender

The computed t value of 1.74 was greater than the tabular value of 1.682 at 0.05 level of significant. This means that there was a significant difference between the instructional skills of male and female respondents.

5.3 Civil Status

The computed F value of 0.56 was less than the tabular F value of 3.47. This result indicates that there was no significant difference between the instructional skills of single, married and widowed.

5.4 Educational Attainment

The computed F value of 3.25 is greater than the tabular F value of 2.65. This means that there was a significant difference between the instructional skills of the respondents as to educational attainment.

5.5 Length of Service

The computed F value of 0.63 was less than the tabular F value 2.65. This indicates that there was no significant difference among the instructional skills of the respondents as to length of service.

6. Relationship Between Instructional Skills and Job Satisfaction of Respondent

There was a high positive correlation of 0.63 between the variables correlated. The computed t-value of 6.84 was greater than the tabular value of 1.66. This indicates that the obtained r value of 0.63 was significant at 0.05 level of significance. This indicates that the instructional skills and job satisfaction of the respondents are significantly related to each other.

CONCLUSIONS

Within the limitation of the study, the following conclusions are drawn:

  1. The College of Science Faculty Members are typically old and matured in age; the average mean of their age being 46. As to gender, the female dominated over the male by 38.88%. Sixty-nine percent of the respondents were married. Majority of the respondents are master’s degree holders. The mean score of 13 years in service indicates that most of the respondents have stayed long enough in the service.
  2. The respondents rated mastery of subject matter as very great extent. They believe that the first essential of effective teaching is that the faculty member must have a thorough grasp of the subject he teaches. Organization of the Lesson was ranked the lowest probably because the faculty members believe that the syllabus is enough to remind the students on the topics to be covered for the whole semester.
  3. The faculty members perceived their job as a fulfillment of important job values which were compatible with their needs so that the over-all mean score obtained is described as fully satisfied.
  4. There was no significant difference in instructional skills of faculty members when compared between and among each other.

Results have shown that the instructional skills of the faculty members are related to their job satisfaction

  1. There was no significant difference in instructional skills of faculty members when grouped according to age, civil status and length of service.
  2. There was a significant difference in instructional skills of faculty members when grouped according to gender. This demonstrates that the instructional skills of male and female respondents differ significantly from each other.
  3. There was a significant difference in instructional skills of the respondents when grouped according to educational attainment. This means that the instructional skills of respondents are different from each other based on educational attainment.
  4. There was a high positive correlation and significant relationship between instructional skills and job satisfaction of the respondents.
  5. Based in the foregoing results, it can be inferred that the College of Science faculty members of the Polytechnic University of the Philippines believe that the instructional skills characterizes a college instructor.

RECOMMENDATIONS

On the basis of the findings, the following are recommended:

  1. To improve the instructional skills of the faculty members the university and or the respective college/s should conduct periodic.
  2. Faculty development seminars and trainings on recent innovations and techniques.
  3. Faculty members should aim to pursue post-graduate studies.
  4. Scholarship and promotion opportunities should be given to deserving faculty members which could very well serve as incentive for them to perform their best. Opportunities should be extended abroad.
  5. School administrators, policy-makers and faculty members should re-examine programs, policies and guidelines and strive for excellence, equity and relevance to eradicate problems that hamper higher institutions.

Bibliography

Bell, L. (ed.) Appraising Teachers in Schools: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge. 1998.

Best, John W. Research in Education. 4th Ed. Prentice-Hall Inc. Englewood Cliffe, New Jersey, 1988.

Deauna, Melecio C. Elementary Statistics for Basic Education. Quezon City: Phoenix Publishing House, Inc., 1998

Gregorio, Herman C. Principles and Practices of College Teaching. Quezon City: R.P. Garcia Publishing Inc.1983.

Holmes, D. Evaluating Teachers Effectiveness. Assessment of Colleges and Universities. Iowa City.1974.

Mitchell, J.V., Wise, S.L. and Plake, B.S. Assessment of Teaching . Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey. 1990.

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