I have completely forgoten how to do this and it's giving me a headache I have a

  1. profile image48
    cive footposted 7 years ago

    I have completely forgoten how to do this and it's giving me a headache I have a figure let's...

    say it is 100 and I want to know what 7% and 8% of this figure is basically a % worked backwards if you know what I mean

  2. Beege215e profile image65
    Beege215eposted 7 years ago

    lets say the number is 120 and you want 7%. Well, in your head you know that  1% = two decimal points to the right so it would be 1.2 times 7% =  8.4    if your number were 100 7% would = 7
    if the percent number I want is less than 10 then I go to one and then multiple by the percent I want. If it is say 20% then I go to 10 and multiple you 2.  15% go to ten, then half and add.

  3. Lisa HW profile image73
    Lisa HWposted 7 years ago

    From the way you worded your question it doesn't look to me like you want to "work a percent backwards".  If the number is 100 you know that 100% of 100 is 100 (or 100 "individual percents"). 

    If you move the decimal point (that you can't see but know is there) over one place toward your left hand, you'll see what 10% is (but you don't want that).

    If you move the decimal point over two places toward your left hand, you'll see what 1% is (and that's what you want to start with).

    Here's what 100 would look like if the decimal point were written:  100. (and there may be a zero or two after it - or not).   Here's what moving it one place toward your left would turn it into 10.0.   Here's what happens if you move the decimal point twice toward your left to get 1%:  1.00

    So now you know that 1% is 1.  If you want 7, 8, or whatever other simple percent like that; all you have to do is multiply the 1 (1 percent) by the 7, 8, or whatever other number you want.

    With 7 times the 1 (1%) you easily know that 7 x 1 is 7 (and you've got your 7% of 100).

    Hope this helps, and hope I understood the question correctly.

    100% of any number always refers to how big 100 equal little parts of anything/any number would be if you divided it up into that 100 equal little parts.

    A single percent is always 1%, and figuring out 1% is easy to do by moving the decimal point over two places toward your left.  That's why it can come in handy to figure out the 1% first, and then just multiply that by whatever "number percent" you need to find.

 
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