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Why are barns painted red?

  1. melbel profile image94
    melbelposted 5 years ago

    Why are barns painted red?

  2. pandy2323 profile image67
    pandy2323posted 5 years ago

    Well, first of all, European farmers from a long time ago used a form of linseed-oil (from a flax plant) mixture as a wood sealant to protect the barn. Then, they would add ferrous oxide (aka rust) to the mixture because it is very common and acts as a poison to many types of fungi (like mold and moss) that grow easily on barns. Rich farmers would also add blood (from dead animals) to the mixure- darker red. After the Europeans brought this red barn/rust-linseed idea to America, it became a fad. And when pigmented paint was first created, red paint was cheapest to buy. So now we are left with century-old fad. Even though a lot of farms nowadays don't have red barns. smile

    1. katyzzz profile image60
      katyzzzposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's a great answer, so interesting, the old and the new, I would have left an answer but I just didn't know and now I do.  Good on you

    2. AlexK2009 profile image92
      AlexK2009posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Sounds plausible.  It still seems to be fairly common in Scotland.  Another possible reason is that red makes it  easy to see the barn from a distance and so  get your bearings.  I also note a lot of tractors are also painted red.

    3. profile image0
      whowasposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      How interesting. My barn is green but then I've never been much of a conformist. That seems to have been an excellent answer at the first hit and I have nothing to add except that I found the question interesting as a person with a barn.

    4. profile image0
      JThomp42posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      How stuff works Info.? LOL

    5. Vinsanity100 profile image60
      Vinsanity100posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yeah, this is correct. I was going to write an answer like this but you hit it on the head of the nail.

    6. pandy2323 profile image67
      pandy2323posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      @JThomp haha YES, but a summarized version. With my own input.

  3. AlexK2009 profile image92
    AlexK2009posted 5 years ago

    To keep the elephants away.

    An answer that fits the data

    1. profile image0
      whowasposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Alas Alex2009, 'tis not so. Elephants have only diachromatic vision and can't see red. For your edification:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15781694

    2. AlexK2009 profile image92
      AlexK2009posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Dammn, and it works do well smile

      But thanks for the link. The paper has entered my idea mill

    3. pandy2323 profile image67
      pandy2323posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Haha, well, nice try. Was hilarious. Both of you guys.

  4. tillsontitan profile image87
    tillsontitanposted 5 years ago

    Hard to answer a question that has already been answered with the right answer.  Pandy is correct.  It all started with the European use of linseed oil...she describes the rest correctly!

  5. August Xavier profile image60
    August Xavierposted 5 years ago

    I thought that it had to do something with the fact that the red paint was cheap way back in the day. Now it's almost a tradition to have the barn painted red.

  6. WD Curry 111 profile image61
    WD Curry 111posted 5 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/6806855_f260.jpg

    There were two colors of paint stocked by hardware stores or ordered from a catalog by a farmer . . . white or red. The pigment in the white paint was basic lead carbonate and in the red paint it was lead tetroxide. Houses and outbuildings white . . . the barn red.

  7. SportsBetter profile image78
    SportsBetterposted 5 years ago

    Farm animals enjoy the color red, so farmers accommodate them.

 
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