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jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (11 posts)

Do you think protectionism is good for an economy ?

  1. icv profile image56
    icvposted 3 years ago

    Do you think protectionism is good for an economy ?

  2. lawrence01 profile image80
    lawrence01posted 3 years ago

    No. Protectionism may give some short term solution but it creates longer term problems as the countries you stop the goods coming from retaliate and it becomes a vicious circle.

    1. icv profile image56
      icvposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      yes. It may work in short term. Every economy must aims at stability in the long term

  3. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 3 years ago

    No, but "fair trade" is good for the economy.

    1. icv profile image56
      icvposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      yes. It has two sides. The economy must try to acquire good and fair effects

    2. lawrence01 profile image80
      lawrence01posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      A fair days work is worth a fair days pay. I agree with fair trade

  4. alancaster149 profile image85
    alancaster149posted 3 years ago

    Various countries or communities have tried protectionism. Trouble is, it's like a boomerang. Throw it and it comes back, either TO or AT you. America's tried it, as have older countries. China tried it around the time of the Boxer rebellion, Japan went for it, and Russia in its time. Their economies stagnated. It's the opposite corner of the boxing ring from 'embargo' when your economy is cut off, and the results can be the same:
    'Shut me/us out and see what happens!'
    You can over-tax, you can ban certain goods, but you can't shut out the outside world for long without it reciprocating. We've tried it in the UK long ago, and when we joined the EU that was a kind of club that gave favourable trading terms to fellow members but older partners - in the Commonwealth - went their own way. If we leave the EU we won't necessarily get them back. We'd have to make concessions that could bite for a while. When we were in EFTA (European Free Trade Association) we could pick and choose.
    Edward Heath shut the door on that in 1971 and our EFTA partners either joined the EU or stayed aloof. Austria joined the EU and the Euro-Zone, as did Finland, Ireland, Portugal and Sweden. Denmark joined the EU and stayed out of the Euro, as did we. Norway and Switzerland stayed out of both. Their economies have soared. Greece and Spain are struggling in the Euro-Zone, unable to set their own taxes. Ireland's got down to austerity measures without grumbling (after all, they can just up sticks and come across the sea from Dublin or Dunlaoghaire* as they always have).

    * pronounced: Dunlairey

    1. icv profile image56
      icvposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for sharing your long answer. I found many facts from your replay...

    2. alancaster149 profile image85
      alancaster149posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Now the Hershey chocolate people - who make an American version of Cadbury's Chocolate that nobody likes - has succeeded in banning British manufactured chocolate imports into the US including REAL Cadbury's and Nestles. Let's see where that leads...

    3. lawrence01 profile image80
      lawrence01posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      It's interesting that when Britain joined the EU it was the commonwealth countries that lost out (Australia and NZ) Now our main trading partners are China, Australia and the US with free trade agreements with two and a 'back door' to the third

  5. profile image56
    Ian Mooneposted 3 years ago

    Dude the economy is a complete load of made up "controlled" BS, just the same as our paper money is a complete illusion..Just the same as the stock market & all banks, are completely & utterly controlled corrupt & obscene..America's completely bankrupt just like Britain is completely bankrupt so how are they still running?, because it's all an illusion & there is nothing that can be done to save our "economies"....All designed just so the politicians masters can come in, & buy your country from under your feet...Happening all over the world in every country, & the people are so weak it now looks inevitable.

 
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