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Why don't churches teach verified out of body experiences as proof of an afterli

  1. Jay C OBrien profile image65
    Jay C OBrienposted 3 years ago

    Why don't churches teach verified out of body experiences as proof of an afterlife?

    Since out of body experiences (OOBEs) have been verified by M.D.s why don't churches teach OOBEs as proof of an afterlife?

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  2. Lady Guinevere profile image61
    Lady Guinevereposted 3 years ago

    I touched on all that with my hub about the Silver Cord, The Holy Trinity and the Ghostly somethingor other.  It is only mentioned in the bible once and it has something to do with a golden bowl amonsgt other things.  I do believe that becasue the clergy do not understand it they don't teach about it.  Imagine all the things that they had taught and most of it would be wrong.  When Jesus died on that cross and they put him in the tomb, he did come back and talked to them in spirit form...that would be a type of OOBE, but church want to keep everyone in the dark about that and make it some mystery.

  3. profile image0
    Stargrrlposted 3 years ago

    Good question.  I have heard of people having OOBE, but never in the church---mostly I've heard of Satanists or witches doing it.  BTW, when Jesus rose from the dead, he rose in the flesh, and appeared to the disciples in the flesh.  That does not count as an OOBE.

    1. Jay C OBrien profile image65
      Jay C OBrienposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      When Jesus was dead, where was his spirit?

  4. wrenchBiscuit profile image83
    wrenchBiscuitposted 3 years ago

    Since Constantine the Great, the purpose of the Christian church has been to control the populace, always in conjunction with a ruling elite. The last thing the church wants to do is empower the people with an understanding of spirituality that would give them a greater sense of independence. The teachings of Jesus are quite useful, but the great irony is that the church does not represent Jesus, but in name only. Religion and the church has helped to socially retard mankind, while perpetuating  an  evil world in the name of righteousness.

    1. Jay C OBrien profile image65
      Jay C OBrienposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      So, can't we start our own church based on Jesus and spirituality and proved by OOBEs?

    2. wrenchBiscuit profile image83
      wrenchBiscuitposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Of course!  People have been starting their own churches for centuries. I'll be waiting anxiously to see what you have to offer.

    3. Jay C OBrien profile image65
      Jay C OBrienposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      All we have to do is declare it.  Also see Association for Research and Enlightenment (ARE).  They have study groups which study such things.

  5. Mel Carriere profile image93
    Mel Carriereposted 3 years ago

    Most churches don't believe in the supernatural, strange but true.  In particular most mainstream, non-charismatic evangelical churches reject the possibility of miracles, demonic possession, speaking in tongues or any phenomenon that could come from a supernatural source.  It doesn't surprise me at all that they reject out of body experiences as well.

    1. Jay C OBrien profile image65
      Jay C OBrienposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      The question asks about medically verified OOBEs not the supernatural.  Why don't churches teach the proof of their theory of an afterlife?

  6. M. T. Dremer profile image95
    M. T. Dremerposted 3 years ago

    Technically, an out of body experience can't be verified. All a doctor can do is say that a patient reported it happening to them, they cannot say if it actually happened. And the multitude of people who are brought back from the brink of death, that don't have an oobe, suggest that it's not proof of anything. Which is probably why churches don't use it. Because it's the equivalent of someone saying 'god spoke to me personally'. That story doesn't necessarily match up with the church's mission.

    1. Jay C OBrien profile image65
      Jay C OBrienposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      "Verified" means the person received information which was corroborated while the person could not have physically made the observation.  See Hub, "Near Death Experiences and What they Mean."  See IANDS.  Read books by Raymond A. Moody, Jr. M.D.

    2. M. T. Dremer profile image95
      M. T. Dremerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      It's still relying on personal accounts, not something that can be repeated. And the ongoing senses of a freshly deceased, or nearly deceased, human aren't necessarily supernatural.

    3. Jay C OBrien profile image65
      Jay C OBrienposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Many OOBEs have been reported and confirmed.   Yes, OOBEs are not controllable, but that does not mean OOBEs do not exist.  They are just not controllable.  Q:  why don't churches study and teach the verified OOBEs as proof of an afterlife?

    4. M. T. Dremer profile image95
      M. T. Dremerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      My point is that the validity of reported OBBEs is about on par with reports of alien abduction or bigfoot sightings. Which is why churches probably don't use them; they're too far off the road from the mainstream.

    5. Jay C OBrien profile image65
      Jay C OBrienposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, the question is whether OOBEs are truly verified.  See books by Raymond A. Moody, Jr. M.D. and IANDS website.  Decide only after investigation.

 
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