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jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (7 posts)

Is teaching a job for the average person?

  1. Felix Nyawuni profile image71
    Felix Nyawuniposted 2 years ago

    Is teaching a job for the average person?

    I ask this question because of my profession. My friends tell me sometimes that only a poor person will like to go to college.

  2. Kalafina profile image73
    Kalafinaposted 2 years ago

    What are you asking? And what does your second sentence mean? are you saying '...is likely to go to college' or 'would like to go to college?' If you are wondering if anyone can be a teacher then yes, that is true (technically whenever you explain/show how to do something to someone you are 'teaching' them). If you are asking about being a teacher in your local school, college, or university then getting a higher education is necessary. Although I think you can teach preschool and kindergarten with a highschool degree (anybody know?).

    As for whatever you are saying about the poor person and college...well...I'm not precisely sure what you mean but I will tell you this. Although college is no graduate school degree it will still shine on your resume. Once you get the degree it opens up a lot of doors. You have the option of further education becoming a doctor, lawyer, engineer. You learn a great deal about yourself in college as well. Not to mention improving skills like writing, problem-solving, and reading. All traits which are a must to be taken seriously for a job in this world.

  3. Jean Bakula profile image97
    Jean Bakulaposted 2 years ago

    My son has a teaching degree, elementary school, as he has a great rapport with young children. There is a lot of sexism and politics in teaching. He's been out of college for 4 years now, and only worked up to being a Teacher's aide. The money is awful, and if you are a man, they expect  you to teach about 5th or 6th grade, and be a coach of a sport. I don't think teachers in Kindergarten and 1st grade need to look like Mary Poppins in the 21st century.

    You can't teach anywhere without a teaching degree, and most Kindergartens are all day now, playtime is over. And it's not an respected profession in the U.S., so the pay is awful. The idea of "tenure" after 3 years allows the school to use that and get rid of any teacher after they use them for 3 years. Especially when the teacher is good, and makes the lazy ones look bad.

    Mostly, you have to apply at a school in your own town, where you went to school, and everyone knows you. Or you need political help from a well known person in your area. My son is getting disgusted and thinking of going in a new direction. Although he is a good teacher, patient and makes interesting lessons, it's taking too long to find a tenured job.

    1. Kalafina profile image73
      Kalafinaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Odd. Where does he live? My friends who are teachers, and brother-in-law, had none of those issues. Is he with a public school system or private?

    2. Jean Bakula profile image97
      Jean Bakulaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Public. Graduated Summa cum laude, did loads of volunteerism. Interviewed for 3 jobs,came in 2nd to women in their 40's from town. Has 2 jobs and can't go far to make it to both. Believe it's sexism. 1st interview allowed him to sub.

  4. m abdullah javed profile image77
    m abdullah javedposted 2 years ago

    It depends on one's perception about the teaching profession, if it's meant for training of younger generation and preparing of youth for the betterment of society and the nation than this profession has to be adopted by the elite class and cream of the society. If a teacher happens to be well educated and a person of high caliber the impacts of his teaching will also be of same stature. Therefore teaching profession has to be meant for high profile and intelligent people.

    1. Jean Bakula profile image97
      Jean Bakulaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      This is true. In the US, you need a degree in a subject, and the teaching certification is a separate thing, like a double major, so the person has to be smart. But when everyone has a degree, it starts to mean less. We need people in the trades now.

 
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