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Should intellectual skepticism be a part of regular school curriculum?

  1. sriparna profile image82
    sriparnaposted 2 years ago

    Should intellectual skepticism be a part of regular school curriculum?

    'Respectfully doubting and questioning authority, textbooks, teachers and internet sources' is an essential thinking disposition/mindset which should be integrated into the school curriculum. Nothing should go unchallenged or unquestioned. Do you agree?

  2. m abdullah javed profile image79
    m abdullah javedposted 2 years ago

    I agree with its spirit but Intellectual Skepticism appears quite negative term as the sum total of the efforts made would be in the form of doubts and confusions. Rather, I should prefer, based on certain objectives, analytical and critical studies to be part of every subject. Intellectuals can't be created with an external infusing system rather the education system should have all the ingredients of positive and healthy thinking which will ultimately produce the desired intellectuals.

    1. sriparna profile image82
      sriparnaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks, when you say 'critical studies' in every subject would be important, I guess that would incorporate some questioning. Questions come naturally when we are curious or in doubt or confused, we tend to learn more from such perplexing situations.

    2. m abdullah javed profile image79
      m abdullah javedposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      You are right sriparna.

  3. Blond Logic profile image98
    Blond Logicposted 2 years ago

    I would say it would depend on the age. Senior year at high school or at university. I was told to question everything and I do.
    When I read a headline, I take it with a grain of salt. There are always two sides to a story.
    We all know the internet is full of misinformation, as are the newspapers.

    If it is included too early, a teacher could never 'teach' a class, she/he would be having to defend a simple point before they moved on to the next part of a lesson.

    I remember questioning a mathematical theory, and my professor just said, "Let's just assume it is true and move on."

    1. sriparna profile image82
      sriparnaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks. Questioning headlines and internet information is a life long skill, which as you said comes naturally as you grow mature. But there are people who grow by age and still cannot think or have views of their own, they follow blindly.

 
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