jump to last post 1-1 of 1 discussions (10 posts)

Gravity and Cells

  1. TruthDebater profile image51
    TruthDebaterposted 7 years ago

    Does gravity put planets and other matter together to create life like cells put us together?

    1. wilderness profile image99
      wildernessposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      ???  Cells do not "put us together"; they reproduce, attaching chemically to each other as they do so.  Gravity is a force of attraction between any two particles of matter, but the gravity between any two cells would be so weak as to be useless.

      1. TruthDebater profile image51
        TruthDebaterposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Yes, they also communicate with each other in forming communities within themselves. Gravity is small particles coming together to form communities, cells are small lives coming together to form communities, it takes gravity to put the cells together. What do you mean the gravity of the cells would be useless, I am misunderstanding this part? I'm not talking about cells putting the universe together although physics leans that it does claiming that all is created from the subjective. thanks

        1. wilderness profile image99
          wildernessposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          Philosophically, gravity may build cells into bodies.  Physically, when cells reproduce and divide they are already in contact.  Chemical interaction, not gravity holds them there.  The attraction of gravity between any two such minute "particles" such as cells is extremely weak.  The smallest interaction with other particles such as air would immediately break any contact between two cells held together only by gravity. 

          On the other hand perhaps I misunderstand you entirely.  You indicate physics claims all is created from the subject, but the study of physics does all it possibly can to eliminate the subjective from any considerations.

          1. TruthDebater profile image51
            TruthDebaterposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            Without gravity to regulate the chemicals movement, how would there be correct transportation of chemicals? How can physics eliminate the subjective when subjective can impact a particles location and reality? It takes the subjective to measure or view the objective. This is what physics says. thanks

            1. wilderness profile image99
              wildernessposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              Were gravity the only regulator of chemicals movements we could only grow down, not up.  Sap would not climb a tree trunk, and the hair on your head would not grow at all as it needs to go up, not down.

              Of the known physical forces, gravity is by far the weakest - the only reason the effect is large (you cannot jump up a mile and drift back down) is because of size.  The earth has a large gravity field because of the uncountable number of atoms in it.  Solitary cells have relatively few atoms and exert very little gravitational force on neighboring atoms or cells.

              1. TruthDebater profile image51
                TruthDebaterposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                But gravity does regulate our growth, if it pushed down on us too hard, we couldn't grow tall, or could we? Gravity also plays a part in plants and trees, they gravitate towards the sunlight.

                I don't understand how gravity is considered weak when it regulates and puts order into the entire universe. Without gravity, how would we be alive to define weak? Weak compared to what? Not about how much gravitational force the cells put out, but the gravity that allows them movement. I am enjoying your comments, thanks.

                1. wilderness profile image99
                  wildernessposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                  Gravity is extremely weak when compared to electromagnetic force, and the strong and weak nuclear forces.  Gravity does not "allow" movement of anything; the ONLY thing it can do is attract one particle to another.  Nothing else.  Everything in the universe is attracted to some degree to everything else.  You are pulled towards the planet Mars, for instance, but the pull of Mars on your body is so slight as to virtually immeasurable, in spite of the fact that Mars is of planetary mass (the amount of gravity between two bodies is dependent on the product of their masses).

                  Consider that a small magnet will pick up a good sized steel plate even AGAINST the pull of gravity from the earth.  Gravity is weak.

                  You're right - plants gravitate towards sunlight.  Opposite gravity, and gravity plays no part (plants will grow nearly sideways if that is where the light is).

                  Size - I really think that if gravity was greater plants and animals could still grow large - nature finds a way.  At the same time increased gravity would affect other things - air pressure would go up, storms might increase in severity and the time between falling and hitting the ground goes down meaning that tall animals might have a real disadvantage as they are generally slow.

                  1. ceciliabeltran profile image75
                    ceciliabeltranposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                    lol

    2. ceciliabeltran profile image75
      ceciliabeltranposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I don't think people will understand this the way you do TD.

 
working