The Clash

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  1. Jonathan Janco profile image65
    Jonathan Jancoposted 7 years ago

    35 yrs ago The Clash were called the only band that mattered. In 2011, I think this still rings true. Music today is as Joe Strummer put it in 1980, 'so cheap and real phony' . . . what are your thoughts???

    1. shazwellyn profile image65
      shazwellynposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Yep... Mr Mellor was a great man who really knew his stuff.  I did a hub about the legacy he left behind and, as in death, he is still helping talent to get out there despite the x factor style of manufacturing, known as strummerville.

      However, I am pleased to see that Joe's associates are helping to fund a new generation of talent by giving them opportunity.

      For example, my son has just been accepted and signed into BA1 studios for young people.  This has been funded by people in the music business to help young talent come through.  They have created studios and are helping young people to achieve their creative potential.  BA1 has been set up as an independent, non profit making, record company based at Bath College in the UK. 

      On speaking with Billy Bragg about free downloading and the death of the music industry in 2006, he came up with an answer which is proven true.  He said that, just as the young people of punk found a way, that our young people of today with find a way too.  You might agree that there is some great music 'out there', if you search - however, this is very much underground.  That has been and always will be the dichotomy.

    2. Uninvited Writer profile image82
      Uninvited Writerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I love the Clash

      1. Jonathan Janco profile image65
        Jonathan Jancoposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        I do too obviously. But unlike you said in my Joe Jax thread, I don't consider the Clash 80's, more of a high water mark of the 70's

        1. Uninvited Writer profile image82
          Uninvited Writerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          Yes definitely 70s, but they did carry over. Joe Strummer did some great stuff in the 80s.

          1. Jonathan Janco profile image65
            Jonathan Jancoposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            Yeah like Earthquake Weather and the Sid & Nancy soundtrack. Both are high on my list for the era.

  2. Jonathan Janco profile image65
    Jonathan Jancoposted 7 years ago

    Wow that's beautiful stuff! Wish ur son the best of luck!

    1. shazwellyn profile image65
      shazwellynposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you.

      An example:  A band called the Arctic Monkeys became a headline band purely because the people loved them - people power always wins through and it is up to us - as interested writers - to promote them with our word of mouth.  It is vital that we keep good music alive by being positive about talent and appreciating that, like everything, it evolves and changes.

      1. Jonathan Janco profile image65
        Jonathan Jancoposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        People power!!! The reason I still breathe. I will check them out and if I like them I will talk abt them!

  3. Jonathan Janco profile image65
    Jonathan Jancoposted 7 years ago

    Looks like you write abt some serious subjects. I will make a pt to read them when I have a bit more patience. Just begining my day you see

    1. shazwellyn profile image65
      shazwellynposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Mick Jones is doing such a lot too.  He has managed bands like the Libertines and has handy connections with up and comers like The Macabees - amongst many others.  Not only that, but he is one of the secret players (along with Paul Simmonon) in Gorillaz (a music project with Alburn of Blur).  There are lots of experimentation going on behind the scenes smile

  4. Jonathan Janco profile image65
    Jonathan Jancoposted 7 years ago

    I like that  ... the ol' vets teaching the new guys how to do it. That's good stuff, for real.

    1. shazwellyn profile image65
      shazwellynposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      The best way to deal with the 'so cheap and real phony' is to walk away from sterilised and manufactured music - dont even give it the ear time.  Go to festivals and find what rocks your boat.  Shy away from free downloading - it is killing creativity - that is not to say that there is no room for this, just use it as a chance to sample, then buy the music to reward the muscian who created it.

      If you liked The Clash, I am sure you would like Hard Fi (stars of CCTV), The Libertines, the dead 60's, tv on the radio...

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6tydlub808
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBS8npnEGIM

      1. Jonathan Janco profile image65
        Jonathan Jancoposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Oh I do . . . same reason I dont watch tv anymore. I try to be openminded to new music but I only seem to hear some accidently . . . like in the situ you describe. But The Clash was technically a major label signee, and there's no mainstream act these days that even approaches them. While I love a lot of bands that have succeeded through word of mouth . . . are the majors that shallow these days? I ask bcos I'm a bit out of touch.

        1. shazwellyn profile image65
          shazwellynposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          The majors are struggling.  Free downloads have killed music.  They are less likely to make a punt on new talent unless they are guaranteed a return.  The likes of x factor and the ilke are sure to have a good return because the shows appeal to the masses. 

          People get high on watching their singer develop on TV and share journey (via interaction - the viewer almost feels the singer is becoming a friend) that they are happy to part with their cash (paid downloading, voting, CDs, merchantice etc).  It is like they want their 'friend' (singer) to succeed.  The viewer, therefore, gets caught in the process and lives the experience through the media of tv.

          In answer to your question... the majors are a business and like any business, the core aim is to make money.  It is good business (they have to answer, remember, to share holders etc) to grab as much money as they can in as little time as possible.  'Investing' their money on talent that may not make it, makes for a gamble that might not be justifiable.

          1. Jonathan Janco profile image65
            Jonathan Jancoposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            Shaz, thanks for taking the time to answer that. Certainly rings true in my opinion.

 
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