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jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (5 posts)

How to parenting hyperactive toddler with natural way?

  1. Luti Febrian W profile image41
    Luti Febrian Wposted 6 years ago

    How to parenting hyperactive toddler with natural way?

    my toddler son, Exxa is such a hyperactive. He like to yelling and talk loudly each time. When he want something its must be realized. And he sometimes hit his 6 month cousin when his cousin is crying and noisy.

  2. thebookmom profile image75
    thebookmomposted 6 years ago

    I think all kids need clear expectations explained in a direct way, maybe tell him what you want him to do with words he can understand and then show him by doing it yourself.  Then stick with it.  Do not give in to his behavior and make sure you follow through with a consequence like time out every time until he begins to see that because you love him you want to help him learn to control his behavior.  It's hard, but you can do it and it will be worth it.

  3. medicinefuture profile image60
    medicinefutureposted 6 years ago

    The seeds of violence and aggression are there in the  behavior of your toddler .It is something to be serious .please do not take it as simple habit.If you write to me by e.mail the full behavior story of your toddler than I may suggest some energy medicine .

  4. duffsmom profile image62
    duffsmomposted 6 years ago

    First and foremost check his diet.  Red 40, sodium benzoate etc. can really affect the way toddlers's behave.  My granddaughter was so hyperactive and aggressive, we were a little concerned about her.  Her mom did some research and changed her diet and she became a different child.

    My G'daughter is now 7 but if someone slips up and she gets Red 40 in something, she immediately becomes aggressive and almost angry about everything.

    It is hidden an a lot of food like Cream Cheese Frosting of all things, spaghetti sauce, Pizza Hut pizza sauce.  So read labels and change his diet - you have nothing to lose by trying it.

    Get rid of as many preservatives as possible, sugar and no soda.  Just try it for a few weeks and see if there is a difference.

  5. smzclark profile image61
    smzclarkposted 6 years ago

    Diet! Feed him foods from natural sources only. No colourings or additives, not too much sugar, no sweeteners...nothing artificial! Chocolate and Coke (and other fizzy pops containing caffiene particularly) are a 'no no'.

    Colours! What colour is your living room? His bedroom? The clothes that you put on him? He needs to be surrounded by calming colours; pale blues and greens...never red!

    Toys! One toy at a time; kids can get overwhelmed with too many things, too many options etc. Books and Art are always good. Too much T.V. or computer games etc. can send anyone round the bend, so that's also a 'no no'.

    Speak calmly to him and act calm around him. Children copy.

    Massage can work wonders. Before he goes to bed, play some soft calming music and gently rub his back for a few minutes...

    Routine is also important. If you give in to his screams, then he knows that he can get his way by acting up. If he gets nothing; no attention (neither positive or negative), eventually he'll give up.

    I know it can be hard. My daughter used to act up dreadfully. It got to the point where to get my attention she would throw herself on the ground and bang her head against things; because I couldn't ignore that (one time I didn't get to her in time and she split her head open so bad that we ended up in hospital!);She's 7 now and we don't have as many outbursts. She still can only have small amounts of chocolate etc. and I still have to work with her, but we're getting there.

    When she becomes uncontrollable; which does still happen on rare occassions; I will force a hug on her. I hold her tight and tell her that I love her, 'calm down sweetie, I love you, I only want what's best for you because I love you, so let's calm down, so we can sort this out'...I can get kicks, bites and allsorts, but she does calm down eventually. And once calm we will talk about how silly and unnecessary the outburst was. She will apologise, we'll hug it out and we will decide on a punishment together.

    The most important thing is to stay calm (behave how you want them to behave).

 
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