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jump to last post 1-13 of 13 discussions (18 posts)

What are some appropriate chores for preschoolers to do around the house?

  1. cardelean profile image89
    cardeleanposted 5 years ago

    What are some appropriate chores for preschoolers to do around the house?

  2. mommygonebonkers profile image69
    mommygonebonkersposted 5 years ago

    I usually have my 4 year old put his clothes away after I'm done folding them. He loves helping set the table. I also have him put his dirty dishes on the kitchen counter when he's done.
    There's probably more little things he could do, but I haven't put much thought into it smile

  3. profile image0
    Jade0215posted 5 years ago

    Helping put clothes in the washer or take them out of the dryer, then having the child put their own clothes away.
    Helping dry the dishes after you wash them. I'd probably stick with giving them the non-glass dishes just in case they drop it.
    Make sure they throw their own trash away...
    I'd say that's probably all that I'd let my preschooler do but my child isn't quite up to that age so I'm sure I'll find more ideas once she is!

  4. JillKostow profile image88
    JillKostowposted 5 years ago

    Household chores can teach children a few valuable lessons. It can teach them responsibility, the value of a dollar, and what it means to be a team player. By instilling these values in your child at a young age you are helping them to succeed later on in life. read more

  5. profile image72
    win-winresourcesposted 5 years ago

    Clean the garage, wash the car, mow the lawn, paint the basement...
    'cause you'll never get any work out of them when they are teenagers...
    then its wipe out refrigerator, demolish the pantry, and pillage your wallet...

    1. cardelean profile image89
      cardeleanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Isn't that the truth!  smile

  6. Ruby Dee profile image56
    Ruby Deeposted 5 years ago

    When my children were little they had a chore list that included putting away their clean clothes, putting their dirty clothes in hamper, feeding the animals, collecting the daily recycles and putting in appropriate bins and setting or clearing the table, minus sharp or breakable items.  These chores were rotated weekly among three kids and added to as they grew older. If chores weren't done, they didn't get their allowance which was my attempt to teach responsibility and proper work ethic as well as working and sharing as a family unit.

    1. cardelean profile image89
      cardeleanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      A chore list is a great idea.

  7. profile image0
    oceansiderposted 5 years ago

    They can pick up the toys in their room and put them in a toy chest or on shelves, and they can put their dirty clothes in the hamper....

  8. Desertarmor profile image74
    Desertarmorposted 5 years ago

    Make it all a fun game, But putting toys away after playing with them, dirty cloths in the laundry basket, I actually have my 5 year old help vacuum, he thinks it mowing the lawn inside.  There are tons of little things to get them started with learning responsibility.  Putting dishes away, I just cant stress enough to make it fun as a game to them and then they will want to help.

    1. cardelean profile image89
      cardeleanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Great idea to make it a game!

  9. Rebecca2904 profile image78
    Rebecca2904posted 5 years ago

    I worked as an au pair a couple of years ago and the little girl I looked after had a little area in the garden that was just for her. She had a couple of little flowers there and a tomato plant that she looked after. I thought this was a great thing for a child to do as she learned to be responsible, as well as enjoying seeing the flowers and getting to eat the tomatoes that grew.

    1. cardelean profile image89
      cardeleanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Tending to a garden is a great activity for kids to do.

  10. nkrohini profile image81
    nkrohiniposted 5 years ago

    I used to ask my toddler to join me or help me in keeping his toys back, keeping the dried clothes inside the cupboard, bring a fruit or vegetable to cut, bring  his clothes or hanky or socks for wash, take the wet clothes from the bucket for drying, hand me clips one by one for drying the clothes, he used to literally throw his glass or plate into the kitchen sink for washing with a thud and enjoyed our response to the sound. He used to take out a plate or a bowl or a spoon from the kitchen cabinet for me while cooking. we used to burn insence sticks in the evening during prayers. He just loved taking them to all rooms and bring it back to be put on the insence holder.

    My husband had this habit of sitting for a while as soon as he came back from work.He removes his shoes and socks and watch and ID card and stuff like that, and my son used to take them and keep in their respective places.

    There are lot of chores like this which you can think for your ward.

  11. Marc Rohde profile image71
    Marc Rohdeposted 5 years ago

    Mow the lawn and take out the garbage.  smile

    We have our 2 year old help clean up his toys  in his room as well as put small safe items in the garbage (like cereal boxes, wrappers, but not glass shards).

    When doing laundry he we have him help load it up and change from washer to dryer--it slows things down a little but saves the back from bending.

    With our 5 year old (technically preschooler since she just turned 5 and will start school next year) we have similar routine but she has learned how to do the full load with adult supervision.  She also loads the dishwasher with all but knives.  The 2 year old will help load plates in the lower rack.

    Our 8 year old can do his own laundry from start to end as well as do the full load of dishes.  He is also happy to make cereal and toast for the younger two when given the chance to make breakfast.

    Not surprisingly non of the kids really LIKE to clean their own rooms; they would rather do something else.  This doesn't stop us from including them in the family chores.

    Don't underestimate what your child can do, just make sure they are safe.  They will respond well to the freedom you are giving them and praise that will likely follow.

  12. zsobig profile image85
    zsobigposted 5 years ago

    If you have the time and the nerve try to introduce the kid to cooking - of course I don't mean to let them 'play' with the oven, but let them help you knead the dough, roll that cinnamon swirl or just put the eggs into the flour. I loved it when I was young and I still wish we had more time with my mom to do it more often.

    1. cardelean profile image89
      cardeleanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      My kids and I actually do a lot of cooking together.  It is a great family and learning activity for them!

  13. profile image48
    jaybirdTposted 5 years ago

    I think you should make them wait till they are older because when i was little i started washing dishes and i hated it when i got older but my cousin waited till he was like 7 and he loves it. And if u do make them do chores yry to make it fun so they wont hate it as much when they get older.

 
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