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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (10 posts)

How do I help my 15 year old son to decided what he wants to do with his life?

  1. dobo700 profile image60
    dobo700posted 5 years ago

    How do I help my 15 year old son to decided what he wants to do with his life?

    He wants to go to college but has no idea what to do. Who should he be talking to?

  2. Sapper profile image70
    Sapperposted 5 years ago

    Nobody can really decide that for him. There are some people who always knew what they wanted to do, and some that don't. I'm almost 30, starting school again in a month, and I still don't know with 100% certainty what I want to do. I know somethings that I don't want to do, but that's about it.

    About the only advise I can give you, and in return him, is that there is nothing wrong with waiting a couple years before starting school, especially with how expensive it is. If I hadn't dropped out of school to go on a deployment, I can honestly say I wouldn't have enjoyed the field I was getting a degree in.

    1. loveofnight profile image82
      loveofnightposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      too often kids think that we have the proper answer, it's a good thing to know that it is a learning process.

  3. duffsmom profile image61
    duffsmomposted 5 years ago

    He's only 15, so much will change for him in the next few years.  Encourage him to get his basics in first in college (all those required courses) and as he gains more experience in life, his interests will narrow and his path will be much clearer.

    Support and encourage him towards excellence in whatever he does now and for the rest of his high school career.  Help him to learn to take pleasure in doing well. He will more than likely know in a few years.

    1. loveofnight profile image82
      loveofnightposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Good answer, I needed to hear this as well,Thanks.

  4. Express10 profile image88
    Express10posted 5 years ago

    He should be talking to both parents and guidance counselors at school. He should be finding shadowing or even intern opportunities for careers that he might have any interest in. If he likes a job and wants to shadow, contact someone you know or even someone in that field that you might not, to ask if he can shadow them for a day. Mentors may also be able to help if one is available.

    It is critical that he gets out there and gets some form of experience with careers, not just taking a blind shot. This is why I recommend shadowing because he'll have a true idea of the day to day tasks and whether or not he's into it. Even if he has no major, he can go to college and get the general courses done while he continues to shadow to get an idea of what he wants to do.

    Stay involved, don't let others steer him into careers that might somehow benefit him. Just one example would be armed forces recruiters. This may be a desired option for some but it is not for a large number of people. Keep the lines of communication open and set clear expectations of him to make the effort to get out there and find something that he's good at and enjoys doing. Best of luck to you.

    1. Express10 profile image88
      Express10posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Sorry, I meant stay involved, don't let others steer him into careers that might benefit THEM.

  5. taburkett profile image60
    taburkettposted 5 years ago

    1.  Assist in his research.
    2.  After researching - seek assistance from professionals in that domain.
    3.  Do not question but discuss his focus.
    4.  Study the bible together - there you will find the answer.

  6. adjkp25 profile image91
    adjkp25posted 5 years ago

    If he has a career counselor at school he could talk to them or he could just talk to you or other family members.

    We have a 15 year old son as well and he doesn't really know what he wants to do either and we aren't worried.  He gets very good grades, has many friends and his teachers enjoy having him in their class.  For us those are pretty good building blocks for whatever path he decides to take in his life.

    Kids at this age have so much going on that a career path or picking a major just hasn't really been deemed a critical thing yet.

    If he was a senior and not sure about what he wanted to do I would be concerned.

  7. Civil War Bob profile image60
    Civil War Bobposted 5 years ago

    Well, the first step is he wants to go to college.
    Next step: Think about where to go and what your pocketbook will afford.
    Then: Find out admission requirements.
    Then: Study to get high grades while retaining teenage fun.
    Then: Take hundreds of hours of grueling personality and aptitude tests to see who he is and what he can do.
    Then: Pay for the medical bills for the last step.
    Then: Graduate
    Then: Well, stumble onto whatever he's going to be as the rest of us pretty much have!! wink
    Oh, prayer might be a good idea, too, if you believe in it!

 
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