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Apples To Apples Variety Guide - Unusual Fruit And Recipes

Updated on November 28, 2015
Source

A Barrel Of Cider Apples

How many varieties of apples do we have in North America? -- Many more than we enjoyed at the turn of the century! Farmers and food researchers are busy developing new variety and tastes of apples so that we may have longer lasting, easier to store, more nutritious and more flavorful fruits.

Johnny Appleseed, who is commemorated by an Ohio museum, spread apple seeds across the Midwestern states and Kentucky during the 1800s, but the fact is little known that the resulting apples from his single-handedly planted orchards were hard cider apples, good for making the alcoholic cider, but not for eating, cooking, or baking. However, the cider was good for selling and brought new business into the communities that possessed the orchards.

From there, orchard-men and later, agricultural scientists, began creating new varieties of fruit from Johnny Appleseed's stock.

"Revenoors" Chopped Down The Cider Apple.

When Prohibition disallowed alcoholic beverages across America in 1920, our cider apple orchards were abandoned by owners, destroyed and replaced by Red Delicious apple trees and a few other eating apples, or harshly chopped down by FBI agents.

Johnny Appleseed's work was nearly ruined in the US, but England remained a bastion of cider making..

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Apple Cider is still placed into barells today."Revenoors" -- The ATF was originally founded in 1886 as the "Revenue Laboratory."
Apple Cider is still placed into barells today.
Apple Cider is still placed into barells today. | Source
"Revenoors" -- The ATF was originally founded in 1886 as the "Revenue Laboratory."
"Revenoors" -- The ATF was originally founded in 1886 as the "Revenue Laboratory." | Source

Some Apples Are Not Apples

In the 1800s, many in the United States and its territories believed the story that the tomato is poisonous. These folks also called the fruit "love apples." Whether or not love is poisonous, Ohio's City of Reynoldsburg was one of the first in America to throw away the story and begin annual tomato festivals with many good dishes to sample.

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In modern interesting foods, we have custard apples and hedge apples, one of which is delicious, but one of which is not even food.

Custard Apple Scenes

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This variety of custard apple is also called Sweetsop or Sugar Apple.A custard apple flower becoming a fruit.The  Black-naped Oriole.likes to eat custard apples.For sale in the market in Taiwan
This variety of custard apple is also called Sweetsop or Sugar Apple.
This variety of custard apple is also called Sweetsop or Sugar Apple. | Source
A custard apple flower becoming a fruit.
A custard apple flower becoming a fruit. | Source
The  Black-naped Oriole.likes to eat custard apples.
The Black-naped Oriole.likes to eat custard apples. | Source
For sale in the market in Taiwan
For sale in the market in Taiwan | Source
Source
Source
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Positive Effects On Cancer

Several clinical trials are ongoing with "Annonaceous" species like the "Asimina triloba" pawpaw at the Nevada Cancer Clinic. Early outcomes are positive! For some pawpaw recipes, see http://hub.me/a3eyM

Asian Indian inspired rabdi dessert.
Asian Indian inspired rabdi dessert. | Source

Cook Time

  • Prep time: 20 min
  • Cook time: 15 min
  • Ready in: 35 min
  • Yields: Four Dessert-Size Servings

Ingredients for Sugar Apple or Custard Apple Dessert

  • 2 Cups Sugar Apple Pulp
  • 3 cans Sweetened Condensed Milk
  • 1.5 Cups White Sugar, adjust sweetness as desired.
  • 3 Tablespoons Chopped or Slivered Almonds
  • 1 tsp Cardamon

Rate Our Recipe

5 stars from 1 rating of Rabdi Dessert

Instructions

  1. In a large pot on the stove top over medium high heat, boil the sweetened condense milk for 10 minutes, stirring constantly.
  2. Add sugar and stir well, until dissolved.
  3. Turn off the burner FIRST and then add the fruit pulp, so as not to scorch it. Remove from burner, stir contents of pot, and allow to cool to room temperature on the counter.
  4. Refrigerate two hours, or until well chilled.
  5. Spoon into servings bowls and enjoy with your own favorite toppings of dark or golden raisins, dried cranberries, dried blueberries, or more nuts - hazelnuts are good.

Nutritious, Delicious, Healthy

The custard apple is on-fat, low salt, and a very good source of protein, but it also supplies 93% of the daily requirement of Vitamin C for adults.

Sugar Apple or Custard Apple

Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 1 Medium Sized Fruit
Calories 150
Calories from Fat0
% Daily Value *
Fat 0 g
Saturated fat 0 g
Unsaturated fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 37 g12%
Sugar 0 g
Fiber 7 g28%
Protein 32 g64%
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 14 mg1%
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.

How To Grow Sugar Apple (Sweetsop) Via a Container or Terrace Garden

An Apple From Texas

The hedge apple came from East Texas sometime before 1400 AD, but spread around the area as Native North Americans began to use its wood, and then the trees spread to the Midwest. In the Plains States especially, the tree is planted as a wind break in a long, tall hedge.

Hedge apples before fruit is mature.
Hedge apples before fruit is mature. | Source
Hedge apple Christmas tree made by arranging fruits in a florist's bowl with greenery added.
Hedge apple Christmas tree made by arranging fruits in a florist's bowl with greenery added. | Source

Hedge Apple Christmas Trees

The hedge apple is a bumpy, knobby fruit that grows on the Osage Orange or Osage Apple tree.The tree was well known to the Osage North American Native Nation, who along with the Comanche Nation, carved excellently strong and accurate bows from the wood for weapons.

The wood of the tree is excellent for making strong fences, specifically on farms and ranches. Many archers claim that the wood makes the finest, strongest bows as well.

Some livestock species will eat the hedge apple, also called the "horse apple", but the fruit can be very bad tasting to humans.Some people have reported that the juice from the fruit burns their hands. However, some work is being done in processing the oils of the fruit for beauty products and at least one clinical trial has used hedge apples in investigations of preventing and curing cancer - the results are not yet published.

For the most part, Midwestern residents use the hedge apple ("spider apple") to scare off spiders with its aroma and oils. In fact, one of our new large bridges in the Downtown Columbus development in Ohio is packed with spiders suddenly and we might use hedge apples to move them out and lessen their concentration at the one site.

Other innovative people have used hedge apples for building decorative Christmas Trees for centerpieces (see attached photo).

Apples to Apples

What Apple Would You Prefer?

See results

Build Yourself A Strong Osage Apple Wood Bow

Osage Nation Native North American

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Osage man painted by the famous George Caitlin in the 1830s.Osage men with American President Calvin Coolidge after signing the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924. In use since 1957.
Osage man painted by the famous George Caitlin in the 1830s.
Osage man painted by the famous George Caitlin in the 1830s. | Source
Osage men with American President Calvin Coolidge after signing the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924.
Osage men with American President Calvin Coolidge after signing the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924. | Source
In use since 1957.
In use since 1957. | Source
Source

© 2015 Patty Inglish

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    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 12 months ago from North America

      Hi there rmr! - It is good to see you here.

      There was an article in yesterday's newspaper about the HoneyCrisp and a new one to be marketed called EverCrisp. I like the Granny Smith apples myself!

    • rmr profile image

      rmr 12 months ago from Livonia, MI

      Hi Patty! It's been a while. Where does the time go? As a rule, I prefer the tart apples, like Granny Smith or Mac. I do, however, really like the ridiculously sweet honeycrisp, which I think has only been around since the early 90's. As a diabetic, I have to be careful of that one, though. It tends to skyrocket the blood sugar!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 22 months ago from North America

      Thanks for all the comments!

      @Kristen Howe - I think we have many new varieties of apples in Ohio every year, since Ohio State University develops new ones. The grocery store and farmers markets are more interesting every year.

      @Helga Silva -I hope you can use these recipes in the near future.

      @Rachel L. Alba - I think that the custard could be done with regular apples, too - maybe make chunky apple sauce first or just dice up the fruit. Let us know how it goes!

    • Rachel L Alba profile image

      Rachel L Alba 22 months ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

      This sounds really interesting. I just got a bunch of apples that my daughter gave me, so I'm going to make this custard. Thanks for sharing the information and recipe.

      Have a Blessed Christmas.

    • Helga Silva profile image

      Helga Silva 22 months ago from USA

      Great hub and amazing pictures.

    • Kristen Howe profile image

      Kristen Howe 23 months ago from Northeast Ohio

      Patty. what a great hub about those apples and what to use with them. There's so many kinds of apples out there. Interesting hub!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 23 months ago from North America

      @peachpurple - That means we can probably substitute the Royal Gala when our stores don't have sugar apples!

      @MsDora - I'd like to see all the different fruits you have there!

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 23 months ago from The Caribbean

      Interesting! We have sugar apple trees in our yard; glad to know it has that much protein. Here in the Caribbean, the custard apple is an entirely different fruit. Thanks for showing these different varieties and uses. woing

    • peachpurple profile image

      peachy 23 months ago from Home Sweet Home

      i love sugar apple compare to royal gala apples but very rare here