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Chicken and Pork Pie in a Hot Water Dough Crust.

Updated on June 4, 2017
tonymead60 profile image

Tony has many passions when it comes to food, pie making is one of his favourites.

What about this for dinner?
What about this for dinner? | Source

Chickcen and Ham


You know, that there are some foods that just go together as if they were designed that way, bread and butter, fish and chips, sausage and mash; a combination I like is ham and chicken made into sausage or pies. So, I thought this last week when my friend Fabio said he was coming over for a cooking evening I thought we could make some pies.

As you might know if you have read some of my other hubs, Fabio comes from Tuscany where they are famous for their pies and sausage so we decided to combine a little bit of Tuscany with a little bit of Yorkshire and see what we could come up with.

I’ve been a pie fan all my life, in fact I’ve a hub about one of my early memories of pies. There is something wonderful about cutting through a deep crust, releasing wonderful aromas and then the satisfying flavours and mouth watering tastes that can come from something as humble as a pie.

Hot Water Pastry


Fabio says that when he was younger they used to help in the vineyards picking the grapes to make Chianti and that always the meals they made were some kind of pie, maybe with a little salad. The pies kept them going all day, and made them happy and satisfied with their work.

We made a hot water pastry, I think they are best for pies; I don’t have much time for puff pastry and so on. This is a very traditional Yorkshire method of making meat pies. It’s origins go way back, it was popular in Tudor times and was probably eaten long before that by the aristocracy.

We made a large quantity of meat mix so that we would be able to make extra pies for the freezer.

The meat ready to begin

some of the the raw ingredients.
some of the the raw ingredients. | Source

For the Jelly.

Fry a chopped onion, 3 cloves of garlic, and a teaspoon of ginger powder in a little oil or butter.

Put the trotter, some carrots, a stick of celery, and the fried onion mix into a large pan, cover with water; add 2 bay leaves, 1 tbls of cider or white wine vinegar, 2 teaspoons of salt, 2 tsp of coriander powder, three large leaves of sage and then boil for two hours or until the trotter is falling apart.

Because we have off-cuts of fat and skin from the chicken I also included them to make a really rich stock and jelly mix.

a good sized bird, plump and tender
a good sized bird, plump and tender | Source
Legs removed and ready to freeze
Legs removed and ready to freeze | Source

Prepare the Chicken

One whole chicken, remove the legs by cutting the bird in half just behind the ribs. Put the legs aside, they can be frozen and eaten later. [[word of warning…if you chicken was frozen and thawed out you cannot re-freeze the legs unless you cook them.]]

Remove as much skin and fat as you can, and then remove the breast by cutting with a very sharp knife as close to the bone as you can. The carcass and wings can be boiled with the trotter, or used to make a separate stock.

The chicken needs to be either chopped very finely or put through a mincing machine.


Chef’s Tip.


To store your stock, strain it well and then three-quarter fill ice cube trays with it and freeze it. You can then use it as you wish just adding a few of the stock ice-cubes to your meal.

Mince Meat

mince the meat
mince the meat | Source

Prepare Your Pork


For the pork

You need about 1 ½ LB of pork shoulder. I use shoulder because it has a balance of fat and meat, and just like when making sausage you need a certain amount of fat to give it the depth of flavour necessary for this pie.

Mince your pork on a medium cut, you can of course buy minced pork if you don’t have a mincer.

Delicious Pork and Chicken


Mix together your pork and chicken mince, add a cupful of bread crumbs and an egg.

Mix in a selection of seasonings; sage, I think is a must for pork and chicken, coriander, salt, white pepper, mace. Add a cup of cider, mix together.

Leave your mix to stand for at least three hours, but overnight is best, just to allow all those wonderful flavours to blend together.

Chef's tip


For extra flavour in your pastry add some chopped sage and coriander leaves into the mix.

Hot Water Pastry


Make the pastry.

1 lb all purpose flour [lately I’ve started using bread flour]

4 oz lard

3 oz butter

½ teaspoonful salt

To make the pastry; place the water and fat into a pan and slowly bring to the boil, once boiling pour in the seasoned flour and mix into dough. Turn out the dough and be careful it might still be very hot. On a floured board roll out the dough until it is about 1/4” thick and carefully place it over your pie tin. Fit the dough to the tin making sure that there are no tears that will leak when the meat is in.

Fill Your Pie


Take some meat and make it into a ball big enough to fill your pie. Don’t pack it in hard, as you need space for the jelly later on.

Roll out a lid for your pie and seal round the joining with the pie using a little water. Cut holes to let out the steam and to pour in the jelly later.

Now cook in the middle of the oven for 1hour 30 minutes at gas mark 7 around 200C it will be a golden brown when done. Melt your trotter jelly once the pie has cooled and using a funnel with the pie and then leave to cool.

5 stars for Chicken and Pork pie
Source

Mouth Watering Flavour


It is quite hard work, but when you taste this miracle of cooking you will so gratified that you’ll want to make more.

Serve it cold with salad or fried chips [French fries]

I love mine with pickled onions, beetroot and homemade bread.

pies ready for the freezer
pies ready for the freezer | Source

Comments

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    • tonymead60 profile image
      Author

      Tony Mead 5 years ago from Yorkshire

      Derdriu,

      I know it's a bit gory, but that's what the hub is about; butchering meat and making pies.

      Thanks for the votes, the visit, and the really nice comments.

      Regards

      Tony

    • profile image

      Derdriu 5 years ago

      Tony, What an enticing, inviting, tasty recipe for chicken and pork pie! Me too, I agree that ham and chicken can be quite a scrumptious combination.

      You do your usual great job of impeccable recipe-sharing through clear, illustrative "pretty pictures" for critical steps within your evolving set of step-by-step instructions.

      In particular, I appreciate the tips on using shoulder meat and cooking previously frozen and thawed chicken legs.

      Additionally, I welcome the serving suggestions. Beetroots, homemade bread, and pickled onions sound the perfect accessories.

      Thank you for sharing, voted up + all.

      Respectfully, Derdriu

    • tonymead60 profile image
      Author

      Tony Mead 5 years ago from Yorkshire

      Kashmir56

      if you have not worked with hot pastry before you will be surprised how easy it is to work. You can replace the lard with butter for fruit pies.

      cheers, thanks for the comments.

      tony

    • kashmir56 profile image

      Thomas Silvia 5 years ago from Massachusetts

      Hi my friend, now this recipe sound awesome and delicious.I'll have to try this one !

    • tonymead60 profile image
      Author

      Tony Mead 5 years ago from Yorkshire

      ethel,

      yes it does look like the day after the massacre, but the pie is great.

      thanks for calling by and commenting, good luck.

      Tony

    • ethel smith profile image

      Eileen Kersey 5 years ago from Kingston-Upon-Hull

      Well the raw meat looks a bit of putting but the cooked food looks delicious. Love pork pie and pork and chicken sounds gorgeous

    • tonymead60 profile image
      Author

      Tony Mead 5 years ago from Yorkshire

      Stessily, did I mention that the original ones were most likely made with fish heads.

      Canary, how predictable, Rin tin tin is spinning in his grave, he was the dog named for it too.

      By the way that was the first American TV programme I ever saw, black and white of course.

      My grandson amuses me because he calls it the black and white years and I'm sure he thinks we were all black and white, opps I suppose we were.

      One TV comentator said, don't forget this is in b&w, about a game of snooker, a bit like pool if you don't it, he said ' for those watching in b&w the blue ball is the one behind the red. Tricky huh!

      see you soon. take care.

    • profile image

      stessily 5 years ago

      Tony, You're comments about Cornish pasties above were interesting and reminded me of traditions which I left behind --- and miss --- in the Midwest. I hope that you locate your Cornish pie recipe; I'm sure that it's good. That whole mining mystique is intriguing. Dogs with matches and maps of mines! Shouldn't you have a canary?

    • tonymead60 profile image
      Author

      Tony Mead 5 years ago from Yorkshire

      Stessily,

      I think I have a really good Cornish pie recipe somewhere, I must look it up, perhaps I could finish that down a mine with little chance of escape, unless the dog makes it back with a box of matches, or a map of the mines.

    • profile image

      stessily 5 years ago

      Tony, The tradition of pasties with their tins and of throwing away the last bit because of lead on miners' fingers was observed during the 19th century mining heyday in southwestern Wisconsin. While those days are long gone, pasty recipes live on as crowd favorites.

      I think meat pies are highly satisfying. I'm not much of a meat eater, but a good meat pie has my stomach's attention.

      I'll look for your turkey recipe now.

      "See you."

      Stessily

    • tonymead60 profile image
      Author

      Tony Mead 5 years ago from Yorkshire

      Hi

      I've just hubbed a recipe for turkey that could easily be replaced with something like quorn. Take a look and let me know what you think.

      see you

    • tonymead60 profile image
      Author

      Tony Mead 5 years ago from Yorkshire

      Stessily, how nice to hear from you again, a doffing of caps is required at this moment.

      I love meat pies as you may have already gathered.

      The original Cornish pasties, were a complete meal, with savoury at one end and sweet at the other, so that the Cornish tin and lead miners had a meal in one. the odd shape to the crust is so that they could hold that bit with their fingers and then throw it away. They were mining lead and it is not a good substance to have on your fingers when you are eating.

    • profile image

      stessily 5 years ago

      Tony, Per your comment above, I'll be interested in your veggie dishes.

      A whole new world is opened up by learning that pies are not exclusive to fruits or desserts and that they are quite versatile. In the Midwest mining towns, Cornish pasties are popular; they're a form of meat pie, and they're delicious.

      As usual, your recipe is tantalizing. I love the ending photo with all those golden pies out of the oven. And your tip about coriander and sage is great; they're a great combination.

      Kind regards, Stessily

    • tonymead60 profile image
      Author

      Tony Mead 5 years ago from Yorkshire

      hi flickr

      many thanks for your comment, I am working on some veggie dishes. Check out my recent hub which was two Italian style meals.

      take care

    • profile image

      Flickr 5 years ago

      that looks awesome, as I've said before I'm a vegetarian? The other day we made vegetarian pot pies, they turned out great. Hmm great ideas thanks for sharing.

    • tonymead60 profile image
      Author

      Tony Mead 5 years ago from Yorkshire

      bruzzbuzz,

      hi, many thanks for taking a look, I hope you do have a go and enjoy this tasty dish. cheers

    • writer20 profile image

      Joyce Haragsim 5 years ago from Southern Nevada

      I'll right over for a pie (kidding). Thanks for the good recipe that I'll print. Voted up and awesome, Joyce.

    • bruzzbuzz profile image

      bruzzbuzz 5 years ago from Texas , USA

      This is a very good and detailed hub and one recipe that I definitely going to give a try. Thanks for putting so much time and effort into it.

    • tonymead60 profile image
      Author

      Tony Mead 5 years ago from Yorkshire

      Hi Gordon

      nice to hear from you again, hmm I've called c&pork because I'm using the shoulder rather than the leg or ham, it makes a difference to the final taste. I think it is a little more subtle a taste and the shoulder fat makes the meat really juicy.

      I make the jelly, and then what is left I use as a base for stock which I then freeze to use later.

      good luck, Tony

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Hi, Tony

      I love chicken and pork or chicken and ham pies. I have made them before but have never taken the time to make the proper jelly the way you do and it seems to be permanently stuck on my "to do" list. Your instructions are excellent and precise and the photos make the pies look delicious.

      Hopefully you've prompted me to finally give it a go.

      Cheers!